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What career I should choose?

What career I would love to choose?

+25 Karma if successful
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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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15 answers


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Ravi’s Answer

Its loaded question.
Choose what you want to do & where you enjoy. Find out way to how to make money out of it. (or) World will choose what to do with you.
There is japanese concept called IKIGAI (Diagram Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rolexpv/36310394281 ), Its Venn diagram let yourself know where cross section you will fit now.. where you want to fit it.

This wont show what door to open. But it will tell what direction you need to look for door you want.
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Robert’s Answer

Try to match your career choice with what you enjoy. What motivates you. That can be a difficult task. It isn't easy to understand what job or career will match what you like doing now or what you might like in the future. The important thing to remember here is that you don't necessarily have a job for life and you can change your career choice if you find you don't like the career or work that you are doing. There is an evolution of roles and careers that happens as you gain experience in any career.
List the things you like doing, list the things that you are good at - hopefully there is some commonality in the lists. Then take the lists and try to see if there are any key skills coming through as a theme. From there - see if there are any career's that match that skillset.
Of course there is an entirely different way to look at the question - find out what pays best and make that your career. If money is the only motivation, be prepared to live with the choice and potentially a frustrating career.
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Alsean’s Answer

It depends on your interests. What do you enjoy doing? What kind of things do you do, or think about, that bring you joy? What are you passionate about? You may not have the answers to these questions, and that's ok, too. But these are some of the self-assessment questions you may want to think about to help steer you in the right direction. I hope this was helpful.
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Katie’s Answer

Hi Hillary! I recommend you choose a career that balances both your interests and your skill sets. Also remember that throughout your career, these interests and skills will evolve, so there will always be an opportunity to try out different career path. A good first step is to write down things that you like and don't like. There are also a number of surveys online that can point out potential career paths based on your responses. Best of luck!
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Heather’s Answer

This question is very broad and should be asked based on what your interests are....Regardless I am going to try and answer it with the lens of what career can you enter with the least amount of debt, shortest amount of time, and highest paying. Right now in our current market the answer is Engineering or Product/Program manager.

Heather recommends the following next steps:

Look at LinkedIn jobs and sort by the highest paying jobs, then look at the qualification section
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Jimil’s Answer

choose software engineering, medical, or law. Most other jobs involve you being on the phone doing customer service or talking to people in meetings all day for 50k/year which is barely enough to survive in the united states. 99% of high paying jobs involve using a computer or certain programs to accomplish your job. Just find the field you want to work in and learn how to use the programs that all of the big companies are using. In my opinion, software engineering is one of the few occupations that doesn't require a degree, but it definitely helps. Also, depending on the geographical area you are located in, there may be more or less opportunities for a certain industry. Take advantage of these opportunities or lack thereof. Move somewhere new if you need to and pursue as many online avenues as possible. The beauty of running your own business is that you create your own opportunities through advertising. In doing so, you decide your own wages. It is very easy to run a business if you already have the funding and expertise at your disposal. If you don't that is okay also, but just understand that each type of business has different barrier to entry, and there are different steps to take along the way in order to achieve financial success. In the United State, it is very easy to file an LLC through the State you are located in. You can complete the forms online for less than 100 dollars depending on your state. If you choose to go a different route instead of white collar work that is fine also, but understand that blue-collar work is more labor intensive and generally pays less. Trade school provide great options for people that want to get more involved in blue collar work. Welding and similar professions pay relatively well for blue-collar workers, The advanced education is directly applied and may be faster to complete than a traditional degree.
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Annelise’s Answer

All the answers here are great! I would just add that you should find out what other people do. Asking people in the workforce what they like and don't like about their jobs can help you figure it out for yourself, too. I majored in Studio Art when I started college because I knew I liked art, but I didn't know how to make a job out of it. One year, I had a roommate majoring in fashion merchandising, which I didn't know was a job! It got me thinking that I'd like to use what I'd learned from my Art classes to switch to fashion design. After graduating with a Fashion Design degree, I searched Indeed.com for jobs that advertised for "design." That's how I discovered that I could specifically focus on Colors, Materials, and Finishes Design for product-based companies. I had never heard of that before I had the job!

I'd say that what's more important than knowing exactly the job you want is knowing what skills you have that transfer. For me, I knew that I liked doing research, I love being creative and drawing, and I like collaborating with people. My classes taught me about the design process, how to work in groups, how to forecast trends, and how to ask the right questions when researching something. Using that as a base, there are a lot of different types of jobs for which I could apply, and the same will be true for you.

When in doubt, ask Professors for guidance :)
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Christina’s Answer

Try to get to know who you are first before nailing down a career choice and know that this will change in your late teens and early 20's. I was given a test like this in my 30's and really wished I had done this sooner- https://www.16personalities.com/. Try that when you get a chance. It is pretty cool to learn more about you and don't forget to retake it as you learn and grow and learn more about you. Spend some time traveling if you can and taking classes in different things to see what you really like. The biggest thing to remember is that it's ok to change your mind even a few times!
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Jon’s Answer

Hi Hillary,

Great question here!

Honestly, there's several factors when choosing a career path that you love, but at its core, it comes down to what interests you. A lot of people may recommend what makes the most money on average, but I've known people that chase dollar signs and end up being miserable. There's an old saying that goes something like, "If you love what you do, you'll never work a day in your life." So definitely take some time to write down/think about/research what interests you.

Since you're still a student in college (I presume, based on your profile), you do have the advantage of time on your side in that, depending on what you want to pursue, you can take the steps necessary to achieve your dream job.

I cannot stress enough the importance of looking into careers that genuinely interest you, both in the short and long term. For instance, if you're really into animals and want to help them in any way, while the most obvious answer is becoming Veterinarian, there's other careers that you could look into, such as being a Wildlife Biologist, or a Zoo Curator. All have short term and long-term paths, but the possibilities are endless and the rewards for you as a person may very well outweigh any monetary gains that come with it.

Also, one other thing to note is that once you pick a career (or more than one, because that's ok too), there's never one clear cut answer/path to get there. Do not be afraid to make mistakes along the way, because while some look at failure as the end of the road, it's best to look at them as an opportunity to learn from them and keep going. Never stop moving forward.

Hope all this helps!

Jon recommends the following next steps:

Make a list of 5-10 potential careers really interest you. Do *NOT* chase dollar signs.
From those 5-10 careers, circle your top 3 that jump out at you that are of major interest.
Once you have those 3, take a look into the path(s) suggested/required to pursue those careers to help manage expectations.
If you haven't decided on a major or are looking to switch, consider if any of the 3 have education paths that can help you get to where you want to go.
Never EVER stop dreaming.
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Diane’s Answer

Hi Hillary, think about areas that truly interest you and that you are passionate about and then look to volunteer or maybe inquire about an internship in those areas. Remember this is something that you want to do the rest of your working life, hopefully, so don't just go into as a "job" but a career. Best of luck!
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Priscilla’s Answer

Hi! Don't worry about getting it right the first time. Choose something you think you would like, try to find a volunteering opportunity so you can see how it is. And if you need to change your choice afterwards, don't fret over it. It's totally normal.
Good luck!!
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Alexa’s Answer

This is a very open ended question, and depends on ALOT! What interest you? (math, science, history, healthcare etc.) Do you want to work with people, or on your own? Do you like to use your hands? These are all things you need to think about. Check out this link to take a career test, I think it will help a lot.


https://futurescape.asa.org/age-gate?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5_SPqZix_AIVw97ICh06-A9sEAAYAiAAEgL_WvD_BwE
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Victor’s Answer

As other people have mentioned, don't worry about it. People's passion changes from time to time. What matters is what do you want to do now. If you want something that is out of your field in the future, there are ways to navigate towards that job you want.
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Gina’s Answer

Choose what you love and what you feel passion for and enjoying to do it, because with time if you don't love your career you will feel bored and you will think to try something else.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. This is a very common question to many students. The most important is to choose you have interest / you like to do. Imagine you work in the career 8-10 hours every day 5 days a week, it is really a pain if you have no interest on the job at all.
Below is my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favorite subjects, etc. and the related careers
E.g. If you are interested in Maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc.
If you are interested in Music, would you like to be a musician, singer, composer, music producer, music teacher, etc.
2. Explore more on these careers and find out more what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue
5. Find out the entry criteria of the relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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