Skip to main content
6 answers
7
Asked 586 views

When should I start looking for internships in college?

Hi, I'm a high school junior at the moment. I've been wondering this question for a while- even if it may seem unreasonable for my age lol.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

6 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Andrew’s Answer

Just like you and your parents/guardians might take "college-tours", you might also want to take "internship tours". Most companies HR departments have an "internship season" where they are recruiting, developing programs and evaluating success of the participants. Ask a company you like in your area if you and your parents/guardians can talk to the "Internship Program Manager" and see if they will let you stop by on or off season and discuss their opportunities.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Jessica
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Milena’s Answer

Most companies that offer internships will begin advertising positions in the Fall semester for the next summer's internships but depending on when they want someone to start, they could be looking year round. Once you have identified your major and the different kinds of fields that you are interested in working in, visit your college or university's Career Services team. Many times they have created relationships and partnerships with different employers in specific fields and will be able to tell you what opportunities are available or when the next career fair will be held. Career fairs are a great way to meet potential employers for internships to learn more about the company and open positions they have available. Another option is going to your major's department and asking if they know of potential internships/companies that have openings, as they also have partnerships with employers. One thing to note is that many internships will be geared toward rising juniors and seniors but you can find internships for freshmen and rising sophomores as well, especially in the technology field.
Thank you comment icon Milena, thank you! Jessica
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Hera’s Answer

Internship programs are not all created equally.

Some are formal programs that plan and fill spots up to a year in advance. Most larger companies have information on their websites about their internship programs, timeline, and application process. Some are paid, some are not. The larger ones for certain roles will even provide a stipend for housing.

Others can be created if you know the right people. If your parents or teachers or other adults have friends at companies that interest you, ask them to gather information or introduce you to the right people to learn more about internship opportunities. My nephew wants to work in aerospace so he reached out to his parent's friends to see if Ball or Lockheed had programs and he ended up at another aerospace company, where they created a paid internship role for the summer.

There are significant benefits of knowing people and using that network - it's an important skill to learn if you want to be intentional and proactive about your career path.

There are varied benefits of joining each kind of program. In a class/cohort you get to spend the summer with other interns. But you might have a more individualized, unique experience if a role is created for you. There is no right way to do it, each opportunity is a learning experience and you should try different ones to figure out what works better for you. Often, if you have many different kinds of experiences, you learn faster and more, than if you go back to the same program over and over.

But I agree with everyone else here that you can look for an internship at any point during high school, at university, and beyond.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Hera Jessica
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Frances’s Answer

Hi Jessica,
It is never early enough!
If you can find a part time job or workshop in your area of expertise in HS in the industry you are interested in, Take It! Examples:
- AT&T offered an online summer learning academy. If you were in Comp Sci this would look good on a resume.
- San Francisco School of Design offers summer classes for Jr. HS and HS students. This would look good on a resume for an artist.

If you are comfortable with the instructors, ask them career questions, see what other opportunities there are at the institution you are taking classes with. It never hurts to ask.

Most college students wait until Jr. or Sr. summer to find an internship. But finding a job after college in your field may be competitive. It's always a good idea to start networking early to others in the industry which you are interested early.

Most colleges have a department for job and internships being offered. You can also ask your professors as early as Freshman year if they have any projects over winter or summer break that they need a student to help with. Or ask the office of dean in your degree department. Do not be shy, just schedule an appointment and ask if they are aware of any opportunities. If the department is funding an activity, the dean is sure to know.

Example: My nephew is a sophomore and majoring in Bio Chem, he is working in the lab assisting with a study being done with his university. It is unpaid, but the outcome of the study will be published. He found this through the Chemistry dept at his college being run by one of the professors. He would not have known about it unless he asked.

Good luck!

Frances recommends the following next steps:

Search the internet for a HS workshop or class in your area of interest and take it!
Ask questions of others presently in that field
Find opportunities within the college or university - paid or unpaid
Use deans or professors to find opportunities
Thank you comment icon Frances, thank you! Jessica
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shiloh’s Answer

Hello, I would say right away. Depends if you plan to transfer straight to a university. Once you begin working on a bachelors id advise networking to be a TA and work on getting an internship. If you plan to apply to graduate school, you will need these internships for your resume, as well as three letters of recommendation in order to apply. I made the mistake making myself way to busy, and not building the relationships and connections that I needed along the way. When it came to apply for grad school I had to stay back a bit because I wasn’t working on an internship or as a TA to get those letters of recommendation. I would say soon as you start your bachelors start applying for internships and To be a teachers assistant. That will help you!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice! Jessica
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jeff’s Answer

Your focus is impressive at your age Jessica. I believe your current interest in an internship is an excellent indicator of your future success.
To ensure you're internship delivers maximum value to you, I'd recommend exploring as many industries and job categories as possible. By identifying your passions you can then set your sights on an internship that aligns well with your future career goals.

With your motivation, the future looks bright for you. I wish you much success in your studies and future career choice.

Jeff recommends the following next steps:

Explore potential careers
Identify your passion
Align your education and internship with your career objective.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Jessica
0