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I have found two careers that are of interest to me these are Dietician and Adapted Physical Education Specialist but I do not know a whole lot about either occupation does anyone have any knowledge of these professions?

I like these because I am into my own physical health and I would love to help other people.

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Rian’s Answer

I won't be able to comment on being a physical education specialist but being a dietician is a really cool and neat role. To process of becoming a dietician requires completing an educational course, followed by an approved dietician course, and then passing an exam while maintaining a certification yearly. Of course, this will depend specifically on which state you'll be working in. But as for the role itself, you'll get to directly work with people, often working with them for months at a time, helping them reach a specific goal. For some people, it may be weight loss but for others, they may have a lot of allergies which makes eating difficult. What's unique about the role is that you're able to open up a dialogue with your clients, catering to their personal needs to make them successful. A lot of people really enjoy the role simply for the personal connection created, making the job feel so much easier.

Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Ayden
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Elizabeth’s Answer

One aspect of being a dietitian that is fun is the variety of settings that you could work in. I work in sports, but within this role I also have crossover with medical nutrition therapy, eating disorders, diabetes education, and aspects of community nutrition/foodservice. If you are considering the nutrition path I suggest researching some different areas of nutrition that might be of interest to you. I personally love working with foodservice, but have some colleagues who dislike that part of their job and enjoy working in more clinically based settings.

I can't speak to the variability of work for a physical education specialist, but it might be worth looking into the job responsibilities of a physical therapist or occupational therapist and see what those daily job tasks are. Then you could compare those types of job tasks to nutrition tasks and see if one sounds more appealing to you.
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Stacey’s Answer

I can't speak for the adapted physical education specialist, but I can say as a dietitian there are a lot of fields you can get into as Elizabeth shared. Currently I work as a health coach in the preventive care & chronic disease management space and I really enjoy it!

There is additional schooling & internships you have to do to qualify to take the RD exam, so it's good to know if that's something you want to invest in.

It could also be good to look at the job outlook--maybe go on job posting websites like Indeed and see how many jobs of either are available in the areas you want to reside in the future.

If you have more questions, feel free to contact!
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Jennifer’s Answer

These are two vastly different careers but it's kind of neat that they fit hand in hand.

As a Dietician you would be working as a clinician aiding people in reaching their dietary goals - weight loss, weight gain, increasing nutritional values, decreasing sodium or cholesterol by familiarizing them with My Plate and different types of diets. The position includes helping them to develop a diet plan, educate them about and help them shop for the right foods, create a meal plan, and chart their progress.
You'd need to learn to read and interpret blood labs like CBCs and CMPs, and urinalysis, learn to monitor blood sugars, etc.

As an adapted physical education specialist, you'd be aiding patients in learning to exercise and even increasing mobility and range of motion similar to a person working in occupational therapy or physical therapy.
Thank you comment icon I'm excited to put your great advice to good use! Ayden
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Mary Ann’s Answer

My love for my ailing father when he first got undiagnosed diabetes and passion for food drove me to this path of dietetic practice. I had no clue what I was getting into during my freshman year fully. But then I got exposed to these micro and macronutrients, they seem so abstract but very relatable. Let food be thy Medicine in huge prints on the first page of the thickest nutrition book I've seen those years. As a mom, the benefits of knowing these basic concepts, I could always have an answer to my toddlers when they throw these tricky questions on me. And they have all believed me it seemed. I second Elizabeth, you might want to visit some dietitians in clinics or hospitals, maybe a private practice of a physical therapist or sports trainer. And get a feel for, what you would see yourself doing in the future.
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! Ayden
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