Skip to main content
4 answers
5
Updated 389 views

What is the best way to get into a forensic science type job?

I took a forensics class and decided that it might be something I'm interested in, what is the best way to determine if it is a right fit for me?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mistie’s Answer

Hi T'oni. Forensics is a broad field that encompasses many sub-fields. It entirely depends on what route you take. I If you want to work in the crime laboratory, there are crime scene investigators that conduct fieldwork and forensic scientists (may be called something different) that conduct scientific analysis of evidence. Educational requirements will be based on the agency. However, typical requirements for CSI are either an associate's or bachelors in a criminal justice discipline, while forensic scientists typically require a hard science bachelor's degree in Biology, Chemistry, etc. As I wasn't sure which route I wanted to take, I got my Associated's in a CJ-related discipline, and then my bachelor's in Biology, which gave me the ability to work in either area. There are other options, like medical examiners or pathologists, who manage the investigation of bodies. These are going to have specific requirements as well.

I would suggest researching your agency to see what is required, reaching out and speaking with someone in the field you are interested in, and start assessing the different types of jobs in the field of Forensics. Some agencies offer officer opportunities like ride along, internships, civilian courses, etc. I volunteered in the crime laboratory in my city, which gave me a good idea of where I wanted to work. Good luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shannon’s Answer

Hello Tiffany,

When I was first out of high school, this was the path I thought I wanted for myself. I was very interested in the science aspect of the job. I researched job postings within my local area and reviewed what the education and experience requirements were. Once you have an idea of which undergraduate degree, you can find a college or university that offers that program to review the course descriptions. If, by doing so, you are even more interest in learning the skills needed for this career, then you are on the right path.

Furthermore, like Liediana suggested, I would encourage you to participate in some form of job shadow/internship. This would really help you visualize what the day-to-day work would be like.

Best of Luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michelle’s Answer

There are many fields within the Forensic Science arena and careers. Learning about what you like is a good way to knowing if this area is good for you. Many law enforcement agencies/departments have volunteer or internship programs that you as a student can apply to and get credit hours for. Most of the time the Forensic Science field is science based - having a chemistry, biology or psychology focus, these would be careers in the crime labs or in corrections/ detention (psychology area). The other area of focus as well, is in the crime scene, evidence and photography fields.
Some state crime labs have public open house - where the public and come in and see how and what the scientists do to help the criminal justice system from that perspective. Look for or ask if you can tour a crime lab or talk to someone who can explain about what goes on there and what areas of focus in school for degrees are required.
The state or county courthouse should also be a place where you can ask questions and see what careers are there for you to check out. Sometimes judges and the attorneys in the district attorney or county attorney's offices will allow students (in the criminal justice or law focused undergraduate programs) to do internships, but you have to check.
The medical examiner's office or coroner's office - may allow students to come and question the Forensic Pathologist or other people working there, such as the medical examiner investigators, forensic photographer, the morgue attendants, and even the office personnel. Each plays a roll in handling the deceased in that jurisdiction.
Forensic science plays a big role in corrections as well, with some prisons and jails having social workers, psychologists/psychiatrists who work with the inmates. These are a bit harder to get into, as usually these positions are state or county, even federal jobs. But they all require an understanding of the criminal justice system as well as their fields of study. To get to this level, usually degrees are already obtained in the field and then years of experience are required. But undergraduate interships are not unheard of and clinical course hours are necessary for degrees in this field.
I hope I was able to answer your question. Get with a guidance counselor for more information. Best of luck to you.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Liediana’s Answer

Hi Tiffany, I would suggest that you sign up for attachment or even internships at relevant companies in your area. By having first-hand experience of what the occupation will offer, you will be able to determine if such path is really for you. If the experience deepens your interest in it then excellent! However, if it unravels certain aspects that push you away from that path, do take heart in knowing that you are early into the game and now you have more time to discover what you would like to pursue in life.
0