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What are some good (education-wise) and reasonable (price-wise) colleges to look into for careers in science and technology?

I want to get my associate's degree by the time I graduate high school, so I am also looking at colleges that allow you to transfer your AA.

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Ryan’s Answer

I did the exact same thing in high school! I went for my associates degree virtually while still in high school and completed my degree not long after graduating high school. With that being said, I got my associates degree from a local community college and transferred to another local school that was partnered with my community college to accept its credits. It is very important to make sure the school you are transferring to allows your credits to transfer because it certainly puts you very far ahead and saves a lot of money. Then of course, my current college, that I transferred to is within 15 minutes from my home for commuting which saves a ton of money. For your scenario, that sounds very similar to mine, you should consider the distance from home to allow for cheaper attendance by commuting. On top of that, be certain the school you are transferring to allows your credits to transfer. Not all will transfer so it's a good idea to print out your transcript and print out a course equivalencies sheet that can be found on the college's website that you are applying for.
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Daniel’s Answer

Great question Allyson!

First things first I would do you best to stay in state. Most universities will allow you to transfer credits rather easily if you stay in state. Also, I would start looking for colleges in your junior year. I would highly encourage you if possible to meet with current students at colleges you are considering. This will give you true insight into the experience.

I would stay away from those "college ranking publications" for guidance. Most schools pay for their names to be in these publications and the rankings do not reflect an accurate rating.

A word of encouragement from being in the business world for over ten years. Besides your first or second job the university that you attend does not really matter after about five years. Companies will start looking at what you have accomplished at your current job. Additionally, the more skills and departments you work in will help make you a more well rounded individual. I would encourage you to do your best and not let yourself get "boxed in" at a job.

One last piece of advice. Always look for solutions to problems and be a team player. Companies love employees who bring solutions to problems vs people who just complain and don't have any solutions. Also, no one like people who are not a team player and just watches out for themselves. Always look to improve the process and remember to keep moving forward!

Good luck on the journey!
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Vamshee’s Answer


You can complete some AP classes or honors classes in high school to get a credit transferred to your AA program and also save cost to complete AA.

This link will help you to compare and find best college for AA.
https://www.collegefactual.com/rankings/best-colleges/associates-degrees/the-plains-states/minnesota/

Many universities allow the transfer of credits from other colleges where you completed the AA, check with your AA college and see which universities accept the transfer credits.
You can also check with universities in advance so you can do your AA in the college which works.

For UMN , find the link below for transfer criteria and contact information to get answers.

https://onestop.umn.edu/contact


Hope this helps.

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JYOTHY’s Answer

There are many colleges that offer strong programs in science and technology at reasonable prices. Here are a few to consider:

Community colleges: Community colleges often offer affordable tuition and are a great option for students looking to earn an associate's degree before transferring to a four-year university. Many community colleges have partnerships with universities to make transferring credits easier.

State universities: Many state universities offer strong programs in science and technology at affordable prices, especially for in-state students. Look for universities that have strong partnerships with local businesses and research institutions.

Online universities: Online universities are becoming more popular and offer flexible scheduling and affordable tuition. Look for universities that are accredited and have a strong reputation in science and technology.

Technical colleges: Technical colleges specialize in science and technology fields and offer hands-on training for specific careers. They are often less expensive than four-year universities and can be a good option for students who want to enter the workforce quickly.

Private colleges with generous financial aid: Some private colleges offer generous financial aid packages that can make them more affordable than public universities. Look for colleges that have strong science and technology programs and a history of providing financial aid to students.

When researching colleges, be sure to look into their transfer policies and make sure that your associate's degree will transfer to your desired four-year university. It's also a good idea to look into internships, research opportunities, and job placement rates for graduates of the science and technology programs
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Jaycee’s Answer

Best advise is don't go to expensive colleges. I went to a state college that offered lower prices for classes as opposed to University classes and I am working amongst people with "Expensive" Degrees. Just know they do not care where you got your degree other than that you have one.
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