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what is hard about college?

what hard about college? why should I go to college

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Gloria’s Answer

Hi jaylynn, you have gotten some great information here. I just wanted to add my quick thoughts. In college, I find that there are two basic elements that make college hard. 1) College depends on you controlling your experience rather than something like high school where the school does a lot of the work for you. 2) College life is different than high school, most usually the large classes mean that you don't have as much interaction with teachers. Also if you go away to school, learning about a new place to live can add additional stress to your life. There are also challenges if you opt to work while in school, etc.

Gloria
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Doc’s Answer

TIME MANAGEMENT
Time management is the sticky wicket that will follow you around and create havoc in your life until you come to terms with it. This is one of the most important things you will learn in college, how to manage your time, balancing between classes, study time, social time and work if you have a part time job. The temptation to go out with friends for pizza and ignore the 300 pages you have to read for tomorrow’s class will be great. Naturally, you’ll give in sometimes. The sooner you can get a handle on managing your time, though, the better. Many first year students are overwhelmed with the opportunities available on campus for clubs, sports and activities, but you also have an 8 a.m. class that will interfere with late nights with out with friends. How you handle these obligations depends on your time management skills and your self discipline.
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Michele’s Answer

Going to college can be challenging in many ways. Here are some of the common difficulties that students face in college:

1. Academic rigor: College courses are often more challenging than high school courses, and students are expected to be more independent in their learning.

2. Time management: College students have to balance their academic work with other responsibilities such as work, extracurricular activities, and social life.

3. Financial burden: College can be expensive, and many students have to take out loans or work part-time jobs to pay for tuition, books, and living expenses.

4. Social adjustment: College can be a big transition for students, and it can take time to adjust to a new environment and make new friends.

Despite these challenges, there are many reasons why going to college is a good idea. Here are some of the benefits:

1. Career opportunities: A college degree can open up many career opportunities and increase your earning potential.

2. Personal growth: College can help you develop critical thinking skills, improve your communication skills, and broaden your perspective on the world.

3. Networking: College provides opportunities to meet people from diverse backgrounds and build professional connections that can be valuable in your future career.

4. Independence: College can be a time to gain independence and learn how to manage your own life.

Overall, while college can be challenging, the benefits of a college education can be significant and long-lasting. That said, step 1 is to think about what kind of job or career you would like to pursue. While college can be highly beneficial it isn't always necessary. Maybe a trade school is best to meet your dreams, or certifications programs, etc. I suggest thinking about what you'd like to do and then researching the best way to get started which may or may not included a college degree.
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Michelle’s Answer

Jaylynn,

What a brilliant inquiry! College truly signifies the start of an exhilarating adventure towards total self-reliance for many. It's a time when you'll master the art of balancing your schedule, finances, involvement in activities, and collaborating with others to achieve gratifying projects.

This is a priceless chance to explore more about who you are and to grow from the revelations you uncover about your life's ambitions.

Therefore, savor each instant of this thrilling expedition and delight in the personal development you'll attain.

Your friend
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Andreina’s Answer

When I reflect on my college experience, it wasn't always smooth sailing. Balancing assignments, exams, and a part-time job tested my time management skills, and there were moments of self-doubt and stress.

One particular semester stands out when I found myself overwhelmed with a heavy course load. I was staying up late, juggling multiple projects, and feeling the weight of the high expectations I had set for myself. What kept me going was the support system I found in unexpected places. Connecting with professors who were passionate about their subjects and genuinely invested in their students' success made a significant difference. Their guidance and encouragement became a lifeline during challenging times.
The diverse friendships I formed with classmates brought unique perspectives and shared struggles. We created study groups, pulled all-nighters together, and celebrated each other's victories. The sense of camaraderie made the hardships more manageable.

Looking back, the personal growth I experienced during those years was INVALUABLE. College wasn't just about textbooks and exams; it was about discovering my strengths, learning to navigate challenges, and finding resilience in the face of adversity. The exposure to different ideas, cultures, and people broadened my horizons and shaped my worldview.

Ultimately, what made the hardships of college worthwhile was the transformation I underwent both academically and personally. The degree I earned was not just a piece of paper but a symbol of perseverance, growth, and the lasting connections forged along the way. The challenges were real, but so were the rewards, and the journey was an essential chapter in my life's story.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Jaylynn !

To begin with, you don't have to go to college if you don't want to. Do you want to and are just requesting some persuasion and reassurance ? Or are you trying to justify not wanting to go to college ? Regardless, I would be happy to give you some advice.

More and more, the labor market is changing to specific skilled employment and you don't necessarily have to go to college, but I would highly recommend that you do. When it comes time to apply for meaningful work that can provide you a livable income, you will apply for jobs with many, many others applying for the same job. A job that you absolutely love may require a college degree and if you don't have one, you wouldn't be able to confidently apply for it.

Whatever you major in if you go to college, you will meet great contacts and opportunities that you may not otherwise have without the college experience. Don't get me wrong, college is not just for your future job, it's much more. In college, you will be called upon to sharpen your skills, gain knowledge and wisdom, work hands on projects that you may not otherwise have the opportunity for and build a social and professional network of like minded people. You will progress in your communication skills. You can always strive to obtain this other ways, but nothing will compare to a college experience and the structure it provides. Personal growth is one of the special gifts of being a college student, but you will have to want to do this through academia or find a way that's more suited to your plans.

No one can foretell how one's career will be and no one should say what you have to do. That is a decision you make after exploring all avenues of what to do after high school. Explore online certification programs, on line college, choosing a career that doesn't require a college degree and vocational school. Read all about your options first and than decide. Your college years are a lifetime memory that carry you through your various journeys. I can honestly say that I know too many people who have stated that they have big regrets not getting a college degree.

I didn't find anything difficult about college. You sure are kept busy, though, so good time management skills will be needed or improved upon. Your college experience will be guided by you, what you bring to it and how dedicated you are for being the best you can be.

I hope this was a bit of help and I wish you all the best in whatever you decide.
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Shalmalee’s Answer

As someone who just graduated from college a few months ago, I can try to answer this.

Why should you go to college?
- You should go to make lifelong connections with people in an environment that's unlike any other. Thousands of people your age, all nervous but excited to make connections and figure out what they like and dislike (academics, hobbies, etc).

- Being surrounded by people your age, in and out of class, allows you to meet people with similar interests. Also, it lets you meet people with different beliefs, ideas, and experiences. You can learn from them and they can learn from you.

- You get to pick and choose what you want to learn for once. I was so happy to focus on topics I liked from high school, and not be forced to take the ones I disliked (for the most part). It's still fun to try new topics, you never know what will stick!

What's hard about college?
- Classes will be much more content heavy than high school, but your brain will adjust to it in a surprisingly fast rate. Don't overburden yourself, see how much you can handle successfully while having a life outside of classes. Don't let a few bad grades disappoint you too much. Professors are much more relaxed than you expect, go to office hours and get to know them!

- You will make your own group of friends (or not). However much you put into it, that is how much you'll get out of it. I know people who felt quite lonely in college and did nothing about it. I also know plenty more people who went out to classes, club events, other activities and made friends. It's what you want from the experience.

- Finances. Unless your education/living expenses are fully being paid for, you will have to juggle a job and classes. Time management is difficult, but it's a skill college taught me. I suggest doing work/study programs and becoming an RA (Resident Advisor) to get free housing and salary.

Hope this was helpful!
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Murph,’s Answer

I guess a better question would be, are your dreams and goals leading you on a college path or not? Do you want a job or career? Most jobs don't require a 2 year or 4 year college degree, but it would be helpful. Most careers require a college degree (2 yr or 4 yr, or more) to put you in the field you are looking for. College can be hard if you are not prepared, the college isn't the right fit for you or if you feel like you don't need a college degree to do what you want to do in your life. If you are still in school speak to a career counselor or go to a career services center to get more guidance.
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Jerome’s Answer

Accountability for your work can be tough. Going from a world where teachers checkin and remind you about things to a world where you are responsible for getting things done can be overwhelming.

Find study groups, review your syllabus and break the work down into manageable pieces. Procrastination will make life very hard.
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Alan’s Answer

Jaylinn, what's hard about college depends on the individual. College does require competent writing, reading, organizational and time management skills. Those are harder for some than others. But college also offers more choices than high school. You can pick classes and the types of classes that suit you best. One reason you should go to college is that college graduates on the average earn twice that of high school graduates. But that's not the main reason. College offers students an opportunity to learn to think, to question, to learn how to find answers, to make decisions, to learn about yourself and others of diverse backgrounds, and to find a future path that could be much more fulfilling and purposeful than if you hadn't gone.
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Alvin’s Answer

Studying at university is not difficult if you are determined. One of the most compelling reasons to attend college is to earn more money. Over a lifetime, a higher salary can add up to millions more dollars in the bank. Graduating with a college degree typically leads to more job security, which means you're less likely to face unemployment. More schooling could lead to a happier life—people with bachelor's degrees tend to be happier than those without one. College graduates are more likely to work for companies that offer health insurance benefits than high school grads. Having a college education can help actually you live longer. Those with at least some college education have mortality rates that are less than half of those who haven't participated in college. A college degree isn't just about earning more money or finding a good job. College can also be a place to pursue new passions and expand your worldview. flappy bird
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Christen’s Answer

Time Management and Self Discipline!

It is completely different than K-12. There is no mandatory start and end time, there is no one taking your attendance, and it is all about managing your time and showing up for yourself. This will set a solid foundation for your future.

All the best!
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Going to college, you can learn not only the knowledge, There are profession careers that requires undergraduate degree, e.g. medical, engineering, accounting, law, etc. You can also learn the critical thinking and analysis skills which are vital in your lifetime. On the other hand, you can gain experience on organizing activities, establish people network, etc. These are valuable asset in your life. Having said that , there are some careers you can learn the skills in vocational school, e.g. hair dressing, culinary, make up, etc. The most important you have to find out what careers you have interest first.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would you like to be a musician, singer, musical artist, music composer, music producer, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, banker, engineer, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue.
5. Determine whether you need to attend vocational school or college to acquire the relevant knowledge & skill and find out the entry criteria
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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eva’s Answer

The classes are tougher, the readings are longer, and you have to learn how to study and manage your time independently. But you'll also get to choose what to study, which means you'll take classes in subjects that really interest you.
A college education shows potential employers you can complete a long-term project, you can think critically, solve problems, and have the capacity to learn new things. Most jobs now require at least some college experience; without a degree, you will likely be at a disadvantage when competing against other applicants.
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Aisha’s Answer

College courses are more challenging, with demanding readings, rigorous exams, and extensive homework. The subject matter is also more intricate. You have the freedom to choose what you wish to study, commonly referred to as your "major." Various colleges and universities provide a range of majors to choose from.
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Patrick’s Answer

Thank you, Jaylynn, for your insightful question. It's crucial to consider the various paths available when planning your career. I firmly believe that embarking on a college journey can provide significant opportunities for personal and professional growth, despite the increased academic challenges it may present.

Most people agree that no matter your major, college requires enhanced levels of independent learning, critical thinking, and time management - all vital skills for future success. Transitioning from high school to college necessitates adapting to a new environment, building social connections, and handling increased responsibilities, all of which contribute to your overall growth and resilience. For some, this transition may feel similar to adjusting to high school, but for many, it's an entirely new and exciting journey.

I want to emphasize that college is more than just a stepping stone to your career; it's an investment in your intellectual and personal growth. It nurtures critical thinking and effective communication skills, exposes you to a variety of perspectives, challenges your beliefs, and correlates with higher earning potential. Moreover, it serves as a transformative experience that equips you to navigate the complexities of life.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Jaylynn,

What is challenging about college and why should you go?

College can be a significant challenge for several reasons:

Academic Rigor: College courses are often more challenging and demanding than high school classes. They require a higher level of critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills. The workload is also typically heavier, requiring more time and effort to complete assignments, and readings, and study for exams.

Time Management: Balancing academic responsibilities with other aspects of college life, such as social activities, work, and personal interests, can be difficult. Effective time management is crucial to succeed in college.
Independence: College students are expected to be more independent and self-reliant than high school students. This means taking responsibility for their own learning, making decisions about their schedules, and managing their own finances.
Adjustment: The transition from high school to college can be a significant adjustment. Students must adapt to new environments, routines, and social situations, which can be stressful and challenging.

Despite these challenges, there are many reasons why going to college is a good idea:

Career Opportunities: A college degree can open up many career opportunities that may not be available to those without a degree. Many professions require a college degree as a basic prerequisite.
Higher Earning Potential: On average, college graduates earn more money than those with only a high school diploma. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median weekly earnings for someone with a bachelor’s degree is $1,248, compared to $746 for those with only a high school diploma.
Personal Growth: College provides an opportunity for personal growth and development. Students can explore new ideas, discover new passions, and develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills that will benefit them throughout their lives.
Networking: College provides opportunities to meet and connect with people from diverse backgrounds and experiences. These connections can lead to lifelong friendships, professional relationships, and career opportunities.
Critical Thinking Skills: College courses encourage students to think critically and independently, which are essential skills for success in today’s world. These skills can help students make informed decisions, solve problems, and navigate complex situations in their personal and professional lives.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine.
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