3 answers
Asked Viewed 676 times Translate

What is the best route to becoming a music and electrician engineer?

I'm asking because, my college career choice was to major in music engineering and minor in electrical engineering. Honestly, I chose the careers I enjoy doing and want to make my life style. One day I want to own my own Record/Recording label (music engineering). If I have a wiring problem or my Record label don't start, I can be certified to fix my own technical difficulties or purse a career as a electrician. #music-production #music-recording #electrical-engineering


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
2
100% of 2 Pros

3 answers


Updated Translate

Jayanta’s Answer

If you’re doing electrical engineering (if it’s a bachelor course) then I suggest keep it as major and music engineering (if it’s about sound recording engineering) as minor. To become a recording engineer, you need to have passion for music and achieve knowledge about current trend of music not only in the USA but from rest of the world.
Your electrical engineering degree will definitely help as the strong tool in your recording engineering career. It will be easy to learn and operate studio equipment, including various computer based recording, music making systems. As record label is concerned, it’s not that complicated as before, but again depends on your quality of products. Feel free if you want to know more about music making.
Jay, Studio Music Session.

0
Updated Translate

Jayanta’s Answer

If you’re doing electrical engineering (degree) then I suggest keep it as major and music engineering (if it’s about sound recording engineering) as minor. To become a recording engineer, you need to have passion for music and achieve knowledge about current trend of music not only in the USA but from rest of the world.
Your electrical engineering degree will definitely help as the strong tool in your recording engineering career. It will be easy to learn and operate studio equipment, including various computer based recording, music making systems. As record label is concerned, it’s not that complicated as before, but again depends on your quality of products. Feel free if you want to know more about music making.
Jay, Studio Music Session.

0
Updated Translate

Todd’s Answer

Calvin,

I'm not qualified to answer the aspect of your question in regards to music. The only music I play is iTunes. The electrical engineering part I can help with. From your description of how you would apply your engineering skills to your career, you might be more inclined to pursue electronics engineering, audio engineering, or acoustical engineering. I'm not really aware of what "music engineering" is unless it's considered synonymous with audio engineering. Electronic engineering would certainly be a sub-branch of electrical engineering so perhaps we're on the same page.

If your pursuit of music engineering is indeed the same as being an audio or acoustical engineer, then education and training in electronics would certainly go hand-in-glove with it. Both fields would require you to have an abundance of courses in physics and mathematics. Although becoming an electrician is conceivable, the training in audio and electronics is actually a fair distance from the work of a typical electrician. An electrician is closely related to a consulting electrical engineer who specializes in power and knowledge of the National Electrical Code.

The repair and care of the equipment connected with a recording studio seems to me to be more inline with the education and skills you would pick up from a 2-year degree at a trade or technical school in lieu of an engineering college. Now I feel like I'm talking in circles. I'd need to know more about your exact goals. Regardless, as you prepare to pursue this career, do so by taking as much science and math as you can in High School. If your High School offers a course in physics, that's ideal. Indeed, many acoustical engineers probably have a bachelor's degree in physics.

If you get a chance, visit with a college recruiter or councilor about audio and acoustical engineering course work. Working in a minor in electrical or electronic engineering with the audio or acoustical engineering should be quite easy to achieve as the courses should compliment each other nicely. So...to summarize -- take all the math and science you can in High School, include physics if possible, and visit with a college councilor about the exact branch of engineering your dream career would lend itself to. I wish you the best.

0