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How much electric engineering is in computer engineering

Because I plan on majoring in computer engineering or computer science engineering computer-science computer-engineering

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甜甜’s Answer

This major is a combination of computer hardware and software, system, focusing on the application of wide scope.Through the basic teaching and professional training, have basic knowledge solid foundation, wide knowledge, engineering practice ability is strong, has innovation consciousness, engaged in scientific research in the field of computer science and technology, education, development and application of advanced talents.This professional courses in the main are: electronic technology, discrete mathematics, programming, data structure, operating system, computer composition principle, computer system, computer system structure, compiling principle, computer network, database system, software engineering, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, digital image processing, computer communication principle, multimedia information processing technology, digital signal processing, computer control, network calculation, algorithm design and analysis, information security, applied cryptography, information confrontation, mobile computing, number theory and finite field base, the man-machine interface design, object-oriented programming, etc.
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Daniel’s Answer

This will depend on the specific Uni's program. But generally it'll be about half-ish, maybe a bit less. If you include comp architecture and the like in the EE bucket, then maybe half. Comp engineering will have a lot of exposure to normal computer science programming-type coursework, and then a good chunk of the EE fundamental coursework. You won't have to take nearly as many higher level EE courses though. Do expect to have to take basic circuits, analog/digital, advanced circuits, and some microcontroller courses in EE. You probably wouldn't have to take some of the more low-level stuff (power electronics, t-lines, semiconductors, straight up chemistry). This means that while there will be some math usage required in a CompE degree (e.g. in analog circuits, have fun with amp math and small signal stuff), you'll dodge some of the harder math stuff by not doing pure EE (e.g. multivariable calc in t-lines).

Again though, this will vary depending on the institution.

I have all three of these degrees (which was not a bright idea), EE happened to be the hardest at my Uni. Arguably more of the higher paying jobs are geared towards pure comp sci at this point, though it doesn't really make much of a difference (they'll hire EE or CompE people as well).
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