Skip to main content
9 answers
12
Asked 508 views

How do you know which college is the one?

I’m a sophomore in high school and I feel as if all colleges are the same. I am curious if I am the only one like this. Hoping for some insight from people who have been in the same situation.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

12

9 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jerel’s Answer

Hi Markus and thank you for your question. Don't worry, it's totally normal to feel a bit overwhelmed when it comes to choosing a college. You're definitely not alone in feeling like this! I'd be happy to share some insight and tips on how to find the right college for you.

1. Think about what's most important to you in a college, whether it's the size, location, available majors, extracurricular activities, or campus culture. This will help you narrow down your choices.

2. Look up information about the colleges you're interested in. Check out their websites, attend college fairs, and if possible, visit the campuses. This will give you a better idea of what each school has to offer and whether they align with your priorities.

3. Reach out to current students, alumni, or even your school's guidance counselor. They can provide valuable insight into what it's like to attend a particular college and help you make a more informed decision.

4. College can be expensive, so take a look at the tuition, financial aid, and scholarship opportunities at each school. This might help you decide which college is more affordable or offers better financial support.

I hope this helps. Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Loved reading this, thanks! Chalizae
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Jerel O.! Markus
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Deidre’s Answer

I would highly recommend visiting a bunch of different colleges that have programs that interest you. When I was in high school, it was the same for me - all the colleges felt the same and none of them truly felt like home. Until I visited the college I eventually went to and it felt like I was home. From the admissions counselors to meeting actual professors before I even started, solidified my decision to attend that college. Some colleges have the opportunity for seniors to spend hours to a weekend on campus before making a decision. If there’s a particular college you’re leaning towards, you could always talk to students on campus and see what they like about the school. Good luck on your college journey.

Deidre recommends the following next steps:

Talk to students who attend the college
Reach out to the school and see if you could spend a few hours with some faculty/students
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. Chalizae
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Markus
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brian’s Answer

Hi, Markus. I enrolled in a community college for a couple of reasons: (1) It was just a few miles from home. Funds were tight and I was living with my parents so I could afford to stay in school full time. (2) It was far less expensive than going to a university. Additionally, it was a beautiful campus with a lot of green space. I loved walking the grounds in between classes. From my perspective, the community college close to home was a good idea because it was a smaller campus, which made the adjustment from high school to college more comfortable for me, and it was an easy commute. I didn't own a car and had to ride a bicycle to get to class. I was fortunate to grow up in L.A. where the weather was almost always good for riding a bicycle. Finally, whether you're at a small community college or a large university, you're required to take general ed classes/electives. Why not take them at a community college where it's less expensive?
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Brian! Markus
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Renea’s Answer

Cost is a factor. Your parents jobs and means are a factor because you will be coming home on spring break and winter break as well as the summer months and if they do not have enough money to fork over for gas to come get you or send you money for a plane ..... if you fly then an in town school is your best option. Also which program you want to take decides which college or university to attend. Maybe ask Google or maybe even Alexa? to see what it says for all the help you can get on deciding which one to attend. Godspeed, there is no luck! It's all God, honey!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christen’s Answer

Hi Markus, you have some great recommendations here already, but I have one more. Do you have an idea of what you want to Major in or what you want to do? For example, Purdue is a great school, but a number of their majors are less flexible. Meaning that if you change your mind a year or two in, you may still have 4 years to go. Indiana University is more liberal arts focused which leads to more flexibility to change your mind later (a big exception to this is their Business school).
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kathryn’s Answer

Hi Markus,

First, kudos to you for getting a jump start on your college plans. If you have an idea of what you are interested in, you can begin your search there. I recommend starting a master list of colleges that seem appealing based on the criteria you are looking for. If you are undecided on the size of the college or university that fits you best, divide your list into small, medium and large universities. Small may include regionally recognized colleges or universities that are recognized in a certain region of the U.S. but not well known nationally. Medium and large universities will have more options as far as choice of major. As your senior year draws closer, your list may change. You might remove some colleges/universities while adding others you discover. In the end, choose a mix of colleges to apply to and visit. Applications are expensive, usually $50 and up and visiting, depending on location and proximity, will be even more expensive. Colleges/universities often look for activities such as sports and participation in clubs while in high school. Leadership skills are also considered. If you have the opportunity to take on leadership roles in sports or school government, these will help set you apart from others. If you have both leadership and high GPA, you may wish to consider one of the military academies, U.S. Military Academy, Naval Academy, Air Force or Coast Guard. These are completely paid for, but require a military commitment of about 8 years once you graduate and require much more coordination on the front end (i.e. Congressional recommendation, among others). It's a lot to think about but take it in stride and carve out time each week when you can focus and conduct research.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Kathryn Markus
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Chirayu’s Answer

Choosing a college can be a challenging and overwhelming process. It's understandable to feel unsure and like all colleges are the same at this stage. However, there are a few things you can do to narrow down your options and find the right fit for you. Firstly, consider what you want to study and what kind of environment you thrive in. Look for colleges that have strong programs in your intended field of study and offer a supportive community that aligns with your interests and values. Secondly, think about the location and size of the college. Do you want to be in a big city or a small town? Do you prefer a large campus with lots of activities or a smaller, more intimate setting? These factors can impact your overall experience at college. Thirdly, look at the college's admission requirements, financial aid options, and career services. These are all important factors to consider, as they can impact your ability to attend and succeed at college. Finally, it can be helpful to visit the campuses and speak with current students or alumni. This can give you a better sense of the college culture, community, and opportunities available. Remember, finding the right college takes time and effort, but it's worth it in the end. Don't be afraid to reach out to your high school counselor or college admissions officers for guidance and support throughout the process.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Chirayu Markus
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jennifer’s Answer

It's a good question and they can often feel the same if you don't yet have an idea of what you want in a school; my daughter is in the process of deciding what's right for her right now.
Some considerations to help you view each college and university or start to narrow down what can be an overwhelming list. Think about you and your preferences.
1. Degrees- Do you have an idea on what you'd like to think about as a career? This can narrow it down significantly. Or if you don't know, you will want to look for schools with a larger number of degree options or those with the most degrees in your broad spectrum interests.
A- Most smaller schools are known for something. Ex- an exceptional education curriculum, a medical institute, engineering focus, art or music focuses.
B- If you are interested in a science type degree, what does the school's funding look like? What do they typically get in grant or research money? Has the school reinvested money back into technology improvements?
2. Size- Do you prefer a large school or small? I wanted one where the bigger the better. My daughter is definitely preferring a small school.
3. Geographic location- Do you prefer large busy cities or smaller, quieter towns. This largely ties in with #2 but they are not mutually exclusive. This can also be a simple as a preference to warm or cold climates or proximity to your home.
4. Sports- Do you want to play a collegiate sport too? That will really narrow it down because you then have to find a school with that sport at your level (D1, D2, etc) with your preferred degree too.
5. Cost- Community colleges are usual the most affordable, then public in-state schools or out-of-state with reciprocity. Private schools are next up with Ivy League being the most expensive (still less in-state than out). Are you taking it a ton of loans? Do you have saved money? Can your lawbreakers help? Do you have enough scholarships to cover what your can't afford? Remember you have to pay for school tuition, rent, food, any fun activities, books, possibly transportation, and more. This brings up back to cost of living in larger cities being more too.
6. Student life- I highly recommend school tours or self guided tours. Don't be afraid to ask questions of people on campus you see. If you can't travel their are quite a few people on Too Took our Youtube who do Corian tours too.

There is more but this should get you started.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Fernando’s Answer

Figuring out which college is the ideal for you is something you find out through research. First and for most ask yourself what it is that you're passionate about? What is that one hobby or subject matter that always brings out the best in you? Once you've narrowed it down it's all about finding what career fields are available to you and which colleges or universities offer the better preparation. This process does take time and don't let anyone pressure you into making a quick decision. Review the colleges on offer, check the quality of the curriculum, pricing, financial aid, scholarships, campus life and post graduate aid.

You don't have to limit yourself to just reading the information off of websites. You can also call directly and speak with a representative, and don't worry as long as you're being well mannered the representative will answer all your questions.
0