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I want to become a biomedical engineer. How well does college prepare you for a career in this field?

I am taking a computer science class at my high school and this is a Project Lead The Way course. My teacher explained that the purpose of PLTW was to bridge the gap between college and a job. I would like to know how big the gap is between college classes in biomedical engineering and an actual job. Is there a big difference is the material you learned in college and the information needed for a career?

#biomedical-engineering #engineering

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凡鹏’s Answer

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From my personal point of view, the university is with the society to shorten the psychological gap between students and social people and learning methods, the university is learning basic knowledge and theoretical courses, if engaged in industry and professional counterparts, so the subject foundation helps a lot, such as medicine and accounting, if engaged in industry is not counterpart, so the learning of professional knowledge used relatively less, more is learning things and regulations
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凡鹏’s Answer

Yes, any learning begins with simple industry fundamentals, grows and finds problems in practice, and then solves them, of course, it 's a closed loop process, growing up in the process
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Christopher’s Answer

Leah,
Your undergraduate college experience in engineering will be one of laying a solid problem solving foundation. As far as what's done on a job?..the specific things that you would do on a job are closely related to what your company does to address a societal need.

Often times student-led research at a University is funded/sponsored by an industry or company. For example, if hospitals wanted a better way to monitor patients' vital statistics in a continuous fashion, they may fund research at a school for "fresh" ideas and concepts related to mobile patient monitoring. If they like the results of that research and decide to carry it forward, then there will be no better person to have on their team than YOU, the researcher that led the way as a student.
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Nick’s Answer

I think the bridge between your college education and a career in Biomedical Engineering largely depends on what you spend your time on in school. Your coursework should teach you the engineering and medical foundations you need, but to gain specific knowledge and direct experience in the field you need to focus your elective studies around a specific area that interests you (e.g. bioelectrics, tissue mechanics, etc.) and also take on extracurricular projects or research work that gives you hands-on experience.
Thank you comment icon Thanks you so much! This was very helpful! Leah
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