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What are some good study habits especially for classes like math and science?

I've never really had good study habits before and those classes are really difficult for me. #study-tips #science #math


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Jaclyn’s Answer

To expand on the above answer, I would recommend setting yourself up with a tutor (if you are in college) or another peer who really understands the subject to help guide you toward a better understanding. In addition to re-writing your notes, try to organize the notes in a logical format that takes you through all steps for a math formula and flag areas where you are confused. Finally, set up times with your professor/teacher well before any scheduled test and bring all the notes and homework along with a detailed list of questions for the professor/teacher to go over with you.

Most professors/teachers will be much more willing to help you if you specify areas of confusion rather than saying "I don't get this." I studied chemistry in college and it is an incredibly difficult subject to master and comprehend but with practice and patience, you will get it!

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Vernon’s Answer

Recopy all lecture notes in precise cursive handwriting. Read and highlight your texts. Practice your math problems over and over until you get the logic and the method of each problem. Then, apply the problem to a real-life experience wherever possible.

Put away the iPhone, iPad and all the other distractions. Science and math require focus. Those electronic tools are just that, tools, not a lifestyle.

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Stefanie’s Answer

From my own experience as a student, it can be very tempting to procrastinate or just "squeeze your eyes shut" when faced with a challenging mathematical problem. This leads to unfinished business building up until it becomes unmanageable. This is often why students are forced to drop a class.
So, my advice is: Do whatever you can to not fall behind! Review the day's material as soon as you can after the lecture to identify areas that you find difficult. Get help from your peers, teaching assistants and professors. If possible, obtain complete solutions to the problems you are working on (or similar ones) and study them until you fully understand each step. You will soon be able to identify what strategy to use for a given problem, apply it independently and the whole subject will not seem so overwhelming anymore. Good luck!

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