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How did you find & connect with your mentors?

To become a great person, I think you need to be led by a great person.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Enise’s Answer

Hello David,

If you are studying at the university, Career Mentoring Programme it is one of the best opportunity as an extracurricular activity. It should be on job board or university's social media posts.

You can apply for Career Mentoring programme if you path your way. Once you applied, you can connect with your mentor or mentee (if you are a mentor). If you are a mentee for the first time, you have to fill out the form or create a profile for the platform. You need to complete all processes you have to create your ID: introduction, interests, work experience, extracurricular activities, and awards.

Once you completed, there are two ways to match;

1- If there is a list of mentors, you can read their profiles, and see if a mentor suits your major.

2- If you matched with a mentor randomly, you have to introduce yourself and what you do in your life and in your career, what is your interest and have you experienced a volunteering, an internship, a part-time job. You can ask questions about career, application to the job you want, any issues related to the work in general. Yet, of course, you may unmatch with a mentor who you unsatisfied with. You can be matched another mentor.

I hope this helps.
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Siddharth’s Answer

I have always found mentors at areas of education and work place mainly. You can also find folks who have been experienced in your field of interest and connect with them via linkedin. If you need me to be your mentor happy to help and guide you as well.
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Ann’s Answer

Definitely through networking and on the job. I've had mentors who didn't even realize they were my mentors. Just by observing them, their work styles, leadership, and asking to attend their meetings.

There are plenty of paid coaching services out there, but I think it's easy enough to find one by networking and just reaching out to those you admire who have a great work ethic and simply asking them to help you.

Good luck! Keep us posted.
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Patrick’s Answer

Hi David, I trust you're in good spirits. For me, the key was having someone to brainstorm with and gain fresh insights about my career. I utilized mentors to clarify my career aspirations. Acquiring a mentor can significantly transform your approach and comprehension of others' success stories.

To start, consider professionals you admire - individuals whose careers align with your aspirations. There are fantastic resources like career advisors and educators who can link you with seasoned professionals. Also, don't hesitate to participate in local events or utilize online networks like LinkedIn for connections. It's akin to befriending those who can impart their knowledge to you.

Personally, I joined groups that aligned with my interests such as community service, active involvement in minority communities, and organizations that I witnessed making a real impact. Another tip I picked up was to be transparent about your objectives when conversing with potential mentors. Show them you're genuinely committed to the mentorship process.

I had to keep in mind that I was in control, even with mentors. I had to take initiative, respect their time, and arrange meetings to glean from their experiences. Having multiple mentors can provide diverse viewpoints.

Remember, you're in charge of your own journey, but these steps can significantly enhance your chances of securing great mentors. You can do it!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi David,

Let's talk about Discovering and Building Relationships with Mentors. It's important to tap into different resources and tactics to identify potential mentors and form a solid bond with them. Here are some strategies you might find useful:

Networking: Make sure to attend industry-related events, conferences, and workshops. This is where you can meet professionals who have the same interests or are in the same field as you. Start conversations, exchange details, and connect with those who could be potential mentors.

Online Platforms: Make the most of social media platforms like LinkedIn to connect with professionals in your field. Engage with their posts, share your ideas, and send connection requests to potential mentors.

Alumni Networks: Get in touch with alumni from your school or university, particularly those who work in your field of interest. They can offer valuable advice and guidance based on their own experiences.

Professional Organizations: Consider joining professional organizations related to your field. These groups often have mentorship programs or can help you connect with seasoned professionals.

Mentoring Programs: Many businesses and organizations have formal mentorship programs. This could be an excellent way to connect with a mentor in a structured setting.

Informational Interviews: Contact professionals in your field and ask for informational interviews. This is a chance to ask questions, gain insights into their experiences and career paths, and possibly establish a mentor-mentee relationship.

Once you've identified potential mentors, it's crucial to build a connection with them. Show them your passion, dedication, and genuine desire to learn from them. Take the initiative in reaching out and expressing your gratitude for their time and wisdom. Be open to feedback and constructive criticism, and always thank them for their guidance and support.

Here are some authoritative books that could help you on this journey:

“Effective Mentoring: Building Strong Relationships in the Workplace” by Mary M. Freer and Patricia H. Zimmerman. This book is a comprehensive guide on how to find and connect with mentors, and how to build strong mentoring relationships.

“The Mentor’s Guide: Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships” by Ellen Galinsky. This book provides valuable insights into the role of a mentor and practical advice for establishing and maintaining successful mentoring relationships.

“The Handbook of Mentoring” edited by James R. Arthur and Carol A. Kauffman. This comprehensive handbook covers various aspects of mentoring, including finding and connecting with mentors, and the benefits and challenges of mentoring relationships.

Take care,
James Constantine.
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Cariad’s Answer

Here's a fantastic program that comes with a mentor:

Meet Access Your Potential, a nurturing environment designed for Black and Hispanic/Latinx college students from all academic backgrounds. This program is your stepping stone towards shaping your future career. You'll get the chance to learn from PwC professionals who will serve as your mentors, earn while you learn through paid consulting externships, and access complimentary courses designed to help you grow and figure out your career path. To tap into these amazing, cost-free resources, sign up here: accessyourpotential.pwc.com.
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Josh’s Answer

Fantastic question! From my experience, I've discovered that the majority of individuals are actually eager to serve as mentors. Requesting someone to guide you through a particular experience isn't as daunting or unpredictable as it might appear. Often, mentors are individuals within your field who possess more experience or occupy a higher-level position. Many organizations even have an in-house mentorship network. For example, PwC employs Access Your Potential (AYP) as a tool to cultivate connections, community, and accountability across various specialized fields. Register to gain access to this complimentary program and more at: accessyourpotential.pwc.com
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Prajwal Prakash’s Answer

Hello,

There are numerous strategies to discover a mentor, and it's important to remember that you might need diverse mentors for various facets of your life.
1. In the academic setting - I established relationships with several professors whose classes I found engaging. I approached them with the intent of gaining further insights into their respective fields of expertise. Additionally, I made connections with my senior colleagues during various networking events and reached out to alumni via LinkedIn.
2. In the professional environment - I was fortunate enough to be paired with a career coach in my field. This collaboration helped me to progress in my career.
3. Beyond the workplace - Recognizing my poor physical condition, I decided to hire a personal trainer. This professional relationship evolved, and my trainer became a mentor to me.
4. Family as mentors - I've always valued the relationships I have with my family members and relatives. If you notice a family member who has achieved success in an area that piques your interest, don't hesitate to connect with them. They could potentially become your mentor.
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