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Who do I go to for help?

How do I find more hands on opportunities in the med field as a sophomore ? Where and who should I go to for mentorship and guidance other than people on line.

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Rita’s Answer

I think it's hard in high school. I agree to shadow.

When you are in college, I would work as a medical scribe. That gives you the experience, knowledge, and interaction with doctors to decide if this is the job for you.
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Davina’s Answer

Volunteer or do a job shadow, especially at the smaller independent clincis.
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MARY’s Answer

Finding hands-on opportunities and seeking mentorship in the medical field as a sophomore in Philadelphia can be a great way to gain valuable experience and guidance. Here's how you can go about it:

1. **Contact Your School**: Start by reaching out to your high school's guidance counselor or career services department. They may have information about local internships, volunteer opportunities, or mentorship programs related to the medical field.

2. **Local Hospitals and Clinics**: Hospitals and medical clinics in Philadelphia often offer volunteer or shadowing programs for high school students. Contact these institutions directly and inquire about any opportunities for students.

3. **College and University Outreach**: Reach out to nearby colleges and universities with medical programs, such as the University of Pennsylvania or Temple University. They may have outreach programs, summer camps, or workshops for high school students interested in medicine.

4. **Local Medical Societies**: Explore medical societies or organizations in Philadelphia, such as the Philadelphia County Medical Society. These organizations sometimes have mentorship programs or events that you can participate in.

5. **Health Professions Pipeline Programs**: Some universities or medical schools offer pipeline programs aimed at high school students interested in healthcare careers. These programs can provide mentorship and educational opportunities.

6. **Local Healthcare Professionals**: If you know any healthcare professionals or have family friends in the field, consider reaching out to them for mentorship or guidance. They might be willing to let you shadow them or provide advice on your career path.

7. **Online Resources**: While you mentioned you prefer guidance offline, online resources like websites and forums can still be valuable for researching opportunities and connecting with professionals in your area.

8. **Local Community Organizations**: Check if there are community organizations or nonprofits focused on healthcare or youth education in Philadelphia. They might have programs that align with your interests.

Remember to be proactive, persistent, and professional when reaching out to potential mentors or organizations. It's also a good idea to have a clear sense of what you hope to gain from the experience when contacting them. Building a network and gaining practical experience can be invaluable as you pursue a career in medicine.
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David’s Answer

Great question Harmony! It's a good sign that you even asked for help and obviously have the interest. Others will no doubt have more ideas on this site, but here are a few to get you started.
1. I am the MD advisor for the Medical/Science Club at our local high school. The club is exactly what you're looking for in that our main job is to expose our members to as many areas in "medicine" as we can. There are so many areas you can explore. Not everyone needs to become a doctor. If your school already has such a club, you should join. If there is no club, consider starting one yourself. You would need a teacher/sponsor and approval from the administration, but you could start monthly gatherings with a few friends and invite people from your neighborhood to come and discuss how they got to be where they are. Nurses, EMT's, doctors, chiropractors, PTs, OTs, lab techs, etc, etc - the list is long. If you have a near-by hospital, stop in there, tell them what you're planning and they will have suggestions on possible speakers.
2. If joining a club or starting one yourself isn't your thing, go ahead a reach out on your own to local professionals of all types. Again, most hospitals would be happy to have you as a volunteer in lots of areas - the ER, lab, admitting, x-ray, the med/surg ward, etc. You might be able to rotate through various departments to see what they do and find what really interests you.
3. If a hospital isn't available, walk around and see what your neighborhood offers. There is probably a doctor's office you might have visited, therapists of all types, chiropractors, pharmacies or other places where you could volunteer or observe. You won't know until you ask.
4. Many of us were EMTs in high school and college and worked for an ambulance company to gain exposure to that side of medicine. There are evening classes you can take for EMT training, then work evenings after school or weekends to use your new skills. I found it exciting work, it fit in well with my class schedule, and it pays well.
5. Finally, if you do nothing else this semester, at least stop by the counseling office at school, tell them what you're looking for, and see what advice they offer. Other students have probably done this before you, so your advisor should have at least a few suggestions to get you started soon. If that's a dead-end, ask your favorite teacher or family friend for help.
You're ahead of most students in that you realize you need more than on-line advice if you're serious about how to spend the rest of your life. Get out there, get your hands dirty in a job of some sort and make sure medicine is what really excites you. Good luck!
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Hany’s Answer

There are lots of ways to get a taste of what it's like to work in medicine. In my opinion, the best time to do this is over the summer. You have the most free time during the summer, and there are more experiences available.
https://blog.prepscholar.com/medical-programs-for-high-school-students
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