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When in highschool does the school start talking about career paths or what I can do after highschool?

Hi I'm a junior right now in highschool and once I got into my junior year I thought they would talk to me more about career paths and what I could do after I graduate but they haven't and I would just like to know when they started for you or when they do. Thanks!

Thank you comment icon Hello there! 🎉 Navigating through high school and pondering your future career might seem a bit tricky, huh? Often, schools dive into talks about careers and post-grad plans around junior or senior year, but it can be different everywhere. If those discussions haven’t popped up yet, no stress! You might try chatting with a counselor or a teacher, exploring online career resources, or joining some clubs to start figuring out your own path and what excites you. Your journey is totally unique, and it's super cool to explore and discover at your own pace! khadija sheikh

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Subject: Career question for you

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Deborah’s Answer

Discussions about career paths and post-graduation options typically become more prominent during your junior and senior years of high school. Many schools have dedicated career counselors who work with students to explore their interests, strengths, and goals, providing guidance on college choices, vocational training, and career paths. If you haven't had many discussions about your career path and post-high school options yet, you can take the initiative by scheduling a meeting with a guidance counselor or career advisor at your school. They can provide you with valuable information and guidance tailored to your interests and goals. Additionally, you can start researching colleges, vocational programs, and career options on your own to get a head start on planning for your future. Don't hesitate to reach out for support and guidance as you navigate this important phase of your education and life planning.
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Frederick’s Answer

This is on you. Meaning if you want something go after it. Make an appointment with your counselor and prepare a list of questions you have and ask them. In life you will find that you have the answers, you just need to talk through your thoughts. You will be surprised in what you find within your self.
Thank you comment icon Hey Fredrick, while I understand suggesting a counselor, this student may not have access to one. Knowing that they might not be able to chat with a counselor, do you have any other advice to add? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
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Steve’s Answer

Hi, Sage. You appear to be in the same boat I was in when I was in high school. I went to college and eventually became a print journalist. In school, though, I was quite shy and awkward. In college, I worked for the student newspaper. That helped me in the ways of journalism.

Deborah and Susan are correct in their answers. In my case, it wasn't so easy and straight-forward. I had to work at it. Don't worry. And we all don't all have to go to a four-year university. Good luck, Sage!
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Susan’s Answer

Hello Sage, remember that there's no definitive "right" time to start contemplating your career path, as every school follows its own unique timeline. Some schools organize large-scale presentations in the auditorium, host career fairs in the gym, or conduct smaller, more personal discussions in classrooms. A topic that often gets overlooked is the opportunity to attend a trade or technical school starting in 9th grade, which allows you to enroll for the following three years of high school.

If college is in your future plans, it's crucial to start researching the necessary exams, like the SAT or ACT, which typically begin in your junior year and continue into your senior year. Your guidance counselor or Brace Advisor (if your school provides one) should initiate a conversation about your post-high school career path early in your senior year.

Remember, not all careers necessitate a college degree; some only require two-year programs. I strongly encourage you to reflect on what brings you joy or what you envision doing in the long run. Do you enjoy interacting with people? Do you dream of owning your own business? Do you prefer working collaboratively as part of a team or going solo?

An often-neglected aspect is the annual salary associated with your chosen career and the cost (tuition) you'll need to bear. It's perfectly fine if you're still unsure about your future path. However, it's beneficial to start exploring your options to help narrow down your choices.
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