Skip to main content
1 answer
1
Updated 146 views

How can I can use the sports I been doing in a job?

I have been doing bjj and wrestling for years and recently started boxing. I have achieved somewhat in each sport like state titles in bjj and cities champ In wrestling, I been interested in mma for couple months and I’m in love with the sport mma. I wanna go pro in it but I don’t know how to go pro or spreading my name. I wanna know more about this before I’m really dedicated in it, like what should I avoid, what should I do?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

1

1 answer


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

MMA is a challenging sport that demands an extraordinary level of commitment. Given your background and achievements in wrestling and BJJ, I have no doubt that you possess this level of dedication and discipline. I'd like to share some insights that could guide you and prepare you for the demanding journey that awaits any young combat sports athlete.

Your grappling background is a significant advantage as you transition into MMA, especially since you've mastered wrestling and submission techniques from a young age. It's generally easier to incorporate striking into a grappling base than the other way around. My initial advice would be to seek out MMA gyms known for their wrestling focus, where most fighters have wrestling backgrounds. This environment will provide you with peers who have experienced the wrestling-to-MMA transition. The coaches and trainers at such a gym can devise a fight strategy and training regimen that capitalizes on your strengths while addressing and safeguarding your developing areas, including your transition and clinch game. In today's MMA landscape, fighters must be proficient in all areas. While wrestling and BJJ are excellent starting points, a fighter with strong takedown and submission defense who also excels in striking will likely outperform you. Always remember that the most successful fighters are versatile and can adapt to various styles. A supportive gym, along with dedicated coaches and trainers, is crucial for any fighter, especially those starting their journey.

Follow the advice given to you. There's no need to rush into your first pro fight. I strongly recommend participating in several amateur bouts first, allowing your team to assess each performance and gradually prepare you for more challenging fights. It's vital to heed your coaches' advice if they believe you're not ready to advance. They may have identified vulnerabilities that a more seasoned or skilled opponent could exploit. Embrace humility, be gracious, and accept advice and guidance willingly.

Avoid excessive weight cutting, particularly at a young age. Unless supervised by highly trained professionals, weight cuts can be extremely dangerous, even fatal, leading to kidney failure, seizures, blackouts, and increased susceptibility to concussions due to rapid, significant fluid loss. Aim to cut no more than 10% of your weight, preferably closer to 6-7%. If you're considering the lightweight division, your weight at the start of the camp should not exceed 170-173 pounds, with your final water cut at most 163 pounds. As your body is still developing, it's crucial not to take drastic measures that could cause long-term damage.

Suppose you've had a few successful amateur fights and your team believes you're ready to go pro. By this point, you've likely met several pro fighters and may even train with some. Ask them about their self-promotion strategies, fight selection process, sponsorship acquisition, regulatory compliance, and medical clearance. Most importantly, find out which organizations they avoid. Local pro shows and management often fail to deliver on their promises, so patience is key. Align yourself with people who genuinely want to see you succeed and aren't just looking to profit from booking a fight. The industry can be ruthless, especially towards younger fighters.

To summarize, find a gym with coaches, trainers, and fighters who share your background and skills. Listen to those with more experience, be humble, and progress at a pace your team deems appropriate. Choose a weight class that allows you to focus on fight strategy rather than weight loss and cutting. Be patient and choose your associates wisely when deciding to turn pro. I wish you the best of luck and hope this advice proves helpful. Remember, regardless of your life's path, learning from those who have successfully navigated similar journeys is invaluable.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Raidyn
0