Skip to main content
7 answers
9
Asked 147 views

What degree did you get while in college, and do you use it now?

How practical was it to attend a college for the career you have now?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

7 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christian’s Answer

I earned my Bachelors degree in Finance and Business Analytics and now work as a first-year financial analyst. The skills I gained during my studies are helpful, but not entirely essential for a corporate finance analyst role. Success in this job is more about adaptability and learning on the fly. So, any degree can potentially lead to success in this role.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Andrew’s Answer

I received a BS in physics, a MS in physics, and a PhD in geophysics in college that spanned from 1971 through 1984.

After a one-year sting as a postdoctoral fellow at the Carnegie Institution for Science, I worked as a consultant scientist for a few different company, primary Raytheon, working onsite at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center supporting basic and applied research in geodynamics and space geodesy for two decades.

I concluded my career as a professor of mathematics and statistics for a local college for another 15 years.

My college training may not have prepared me for any of my future jobs. However, I had learned how to learn for all my future jobs. Yes, I was prepared to learn what I had to learn for a wide range of career possibilities.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Edie’s Answer

Most jobs want to see if you went to college, to see if you can take the challenge. They may or may not care about the type of degree---they just want to see if you can tackle hard work and how you accomplish that goal. You learn that in college.

My college did prepare me for my jobs. If you are interested.....read on.

They say, the average person changes their career (not job) an average of 5 times. People change their jobs more than 5 times or 10 times.....but their career is different. Your career change is typically based on values you have at different times in your life.

My undergraduate BA in Psychology, ( I liked working with kids that needed help.) However, taking a job in a group home did not pay enough for an apt, a car, and going out to eat with friends---so I got a corporate job (Sales for General Electric). I did that for 4 years. I did use some Psychology skills in my corporate job---but not a lot.

After a while, I didn't want to sell electrical components any more, so I went back to school. The job paid well, but I didn't see value in making a company wealthy or selling electrical components to Disney World. So I went back to my dream---working with kids. I got my Masters in Education with an emphasis in Counseling. With a Masters degree, I had higher pay. (I was broke in graduate school, but I knew I could do it.) I wanted to help kids. I graduated.

I got a job in the school system and was a counselor at an elementary school. My principle was great. Life was good. Two years later, a new principal came to the school. She had a very different philosophy---and didn't want me helping the kids as much. I tried to stick it out another year. However, to me it is important to help kids--- so I quit. (I should have called Human Resources and told them what was going on, but I didn't.)

So, I job hunted again. I landed at job to work at a college in Career Services--where I helped college students graduating from college--get a job. I taught Career Development and helped them network. I also helped them with resumes. I LOVED when one of the graduates got a job. It was so fulfilling. However, after 2 years, I was passed over for a promotion---they told me I would get.

I was disappointed but decided to apply for a higher job in the same company. Guess what? I got it!! My new job, was 1 level higher than that position!!! So, it did work out. My new role was training and development. I loved helping people learn new things.

15 years later, I'm still training at a Technical Company. I still love training.....I just train adults. Oh! btw---I use my Psychology and Counseling skills every day. Believe it or not, adults don't like change. So I use those skills to talk them through it.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Deborah’s Answer

I earned my undergraduate degree in Biochemistry, and I'm currently pursuing a Direct PhD in the USA. The biochemistry background has been invaluable in preparing me for my doctoral research, as it provided a strong foundation in molecular biology and biochemistry. Pursuing a college degree in a related field was practical in shaping my career, as it equipped me with the knowledge and skills necessary for my current academic pursuits.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Stephanie’s Answer

I earned my BA in Management with a Minor in English. I have definitely use the knowledge I learned from my courses in both areas of study daily. If you're wondering why I selected those areas of study, the simple reason was I couldn't decide what to study, but I knew I wanted something related to business. Management seemed like a good 'catch-all' that could be applied to working in some area of business and I really enjoyed reading and writing, so English was a good fit to be what I considered a 'supplement' to my business major.

For my current career, I certainly use the skills I learned in college. However, college isn't requirement, formal and in-formal training is. Many of my colleagues do not have college degrees, but have on-the-job training, taken certification courses, learned on their own by reading articles, posts, etc. And I work in the world of cybersecurity, which wasn't a 'thing' when I was in college, yet courses and degrees related to this field exist now.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Karthik’s Answer

I went to college for computer science, and used it quite a bit for my first job out of college (security engineer). After I transitioned to consulting, the actual concepts themselves became only superficially relevant to my job, but the underlying thinking and structure of the work I do remains highly relevant.

I'm a huge proponent of studying STEM since it teaches you a lot about the research process, and how to think more critically and be structured in how you approach solving problems, which can come in handy no matter the career you end up working in.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tess’s Answer

I studied liberal arts majors in college--American Studies and Gender Studies. I absolutely loved my 4 years in undergrad. I was passionate about my classes. I learned a lot about key topics--Feminism, history, Critical Race Theory...etc, all of which inform my current worldview. I also learned how to think and write, which helps me every day in my job. Don't feel confined to studying something extremely pre-professional like business or pre-law. Of course, unless you are going into smoothing that has specific pre-requisites for grad school such as med school or nursing. If you are eager to learn certain pre-career skills such as legal or business related skills, you can always minor or take specific courses. Also don't feel pressure to decide on your major right away. I would take the first couple months to be undecided, and then commit. Plus as an earlier student (freshman/sophomore) remember you can always swtich or add on a major.

Savor this time it is so special!!
0