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what does a normal day of work look like as an Anthropologist?

I’m in 9th grade, and I’ve always loved the concept of Anthropology, but was never really sure what the actual career looked like.

#anthropologist #anthropology #human #culture

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Kasia’s Answer

Hi Grace, my best friend is an anthropologist, and she works in a museum as a curator, part-time. The rest of her day is about to teach on the University as she is in the middle of her PhD.
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Jessica’s Answer

Anthropologists examine, analyze, report on, and compare different cultures and how they grow, develop, and interact. How people live offers insights into modern life and how significantly (or, more often, how little) we have changed and how similar we are in our basic systems of interaction. Anthropologists can travel to exotic lands and spend time in primitive conditions or work in developed countries, such as the United States, comparing regional concerns. Cultural anthropologists may compare the culture of the medical world to that of the financial world, or the culture of professional athletes to that of legal professionals. Some anthropologists take a cross-disciplinary approach to the field, studying linguistics, chemistry, nutrition, or behavioral science, and apply the methodologies of those disciplines to their study of culture. Qualities that encourage success in this field include a nonjudgmental, inquisitive mind; patience; and the ability to make inferences from incomplete information. Unlike in other sciences in which significant funding and sizable research teams are usually necessary, an individual can make discoveries while working alone. Most anthropologists are employed by universities; they teach and review others’ work to earn their daily bread. It is rare for an anthropologist to spend more than 15 percent of his or her career outside the university setting. An anthropologist spends a lot of time writing, editing, doing fieldwork, teaching, consulting with other professionals, and producing papers for professional journals. Anthropological research relies on the funding decisions of the federal government, universities, and foundations, the three major and nearly exclusive employers in the field. “Don’t go into this profession unless you’ve got the stomach to play politics,” warned one professor. “It never gets any easier, and it never gets any better.” The immediate return on an investment in anthropology is impossible to quantify, and therefore, hard to justify as a spending item. Anthropology is a competitive field, and those who wish to succeed in it must find creative ways of having their skills recognized. Successful anthropologists quickly learn successful grant-writing skills, find areas of unexplored anthropological concern, and publish articles, essays, and books as early and as often as they can.


https://www.princetonreview.com/careers/8/anthropologist
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Kikanza’s Answer

Anthropology is the study of humans in group settings. I am an anthropologist who specializes in the culture of American organizations. I work to help the leaders of an organization align mission, values and goals with the policies, practices and activities of the people. I help them to close the gap between who they say they are and how people experience them. For example, I am working with a group that is trying to create diverse and equitable policies for the employees. I have attended their meetings and observed how they interact with one another. They do not treat the members of the workgroup equitably, courteously or inclusively. After sharing examples of how they are not living into their values, I am now helping them to learn the skills they need so they can model with one another how they want people in the organization to treat one another.

My travel is limited to the United States and the organizations in them. I specialize working with non-profit organizations, schools, and faith based organizations. I understand the language and cultures of these types of organizations. My work includes observation, teaching and coaching. I have also written some books about my work.

I am not affiliated with a university, although many universities have been my clients and the professors are my colleagues. Anthropology can be a very academic field, or it can be shaped by the work that the person does using tools learned while studying.

Go to the website of the American Anthropological Association and look at the career pages. You will get lots of ideas of how to use a degree in anthropology outside of the university.
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