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What classes should I take to join the Navy.

I would love to join the navy because I want to help america on the sea and land the best way I can #navy #military #military-service

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Kenneth’s Answer

Awesome!!!! Thank you for your interest in joining the worlds greatest Navy. I myself was active duty for 15 years, My wife was for 20 and my brother for 22. So as you can see I am really passionate about this. To answer your question the classes you would need to take honestly would depend on what you want to do in the Navy. Keep in mind that there are tons of career choices. Cyber Security, Legal, Cooks, to weapons. The possibilities are endless. I would suggest that you do as well as you can on the ASVAB test which is the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. It is used to test you and discover the jobs you would be best suited for. Scoring high gets you more options so you really want to focus on that. Online there are study guides that will give you an idea what you should be looking for in term of study.  4tests.com is one site you may want to look at. Hopefully this helps you and keep in mind that you should look at a job that you can transition to once you decide to leave military life. The military provides all the training you need for your future job and often that will give you all the skills you need once you decide to become a civilian again. Good luck.

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Meighan’s Answer

The first thing you should consider is whether you want to join the Navy as an Enlisted Sailor or as an Officer. The preparation will differ slightly depending on which you choose.

For both, do your best academically in your high school classes, maintain your physical fitness, and avoid any disciplinary actions from your high school.

To enlist, you will have to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). You score on the ASVAB will open up certain rates (enlisted job positions) to you. There are ASVAB prep books and even prep classes if you want to work on raising your score for a specific rate.

To enter as an Officer, a college degree is required. There are many Officer programs such as Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), the Naval Academy, or Officer Candidate School (OCS). The major difference between ROTC and the Naval Academy over OCS is that both enable you to graduate college debt free (or close to debt free) as ROTC programs typically provide a full scholarship leaving you to fund housing and living costs and Service Academies are free to attend. In ROTC and at the Naval Academy, you complete your college coursework while you complete your military training, where as at OCS, you attend after attending and graduating college as a civilian student.

Meighan recommends the following next steps:

Read my answer to a similar question here: https://www.careervillage.org/questions/320388/what-do-i-need-to-study-to-get-in-to-the-military
Read more about the difference between Officer and Enlisted: https://www.asvabprogram.com/media-center-article/66
Talk over your options with a trusted adult, mentor, or family member.
Make a curriculum plan with your high school Guidance Counselor
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Chris’s Answer

I was active duty Navy for 9 years, and I can confidently say that Kenneth is absolutely correct - scoring well on the ASVAB is what unlocks various career paths in the Navy. There are a ton of options for Navy careers. You should look at this website, which explains the various jobs: https://www.navycs.com/navy-jobs/


Once you've got a couple that you're interested in, talk to your Navy recruiter. They can give you some more in depth information about your prospective field. The Navy will teach you everything they need you to know, both in formal classrooms and on the job training, but more education is never a bad thing. When you've figured out which direction your job interests lie, you should be able to figure out what classes you need to give you a leg up in your chosen career.



Chris recommends the following next steps:

Read through https://www.navycs.com/navy-jobs/ to learn about the various careers available in the Navy.
Talk to your Navy recruiter to get more information about specific careers.
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John’s Answer

Depending on your desired career path and rate options, I would recommend having an associates in arts. It is a generalized degree plan that does not focus on one specific area as it casts a wide net without a centralized focus on one area. Once you realize what you want to join as (I am an Information systems technician -IT), then you can start to focus on those types of courses. It would not benefit you as much to go to a culinary school and then become an Operations Specialist whose job is to plot charts, and perform course navigation.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Drew,

Steps to Prepare for a Navy Career

If you're considering a career in the Navy, certain classes and courses can significantly enhance your readiness for this path. Here's a list of recommended studies to boost your success:

Physical Education and Fitness: Military service demands excellent physical fitness. Enrolling in physical education, fitness, or sports classes can help you develop the strength, stamina, and overall fitness necessary for Navy training.

Mathematics and Science: For many Navy roles, especially technical ones, a solid foundation in mathematics and science is crucial. This knowledge can aid in understanding navigation, engineering, and other technical elements of naval operations.

Foreign Languages: Acquiring a foreign language can give you an edge in the Navy, particularly if you're drawn to roles involving international relations or foreign communication. Familiarity with languages spoken in areas where the Navy operates can be a significant advantage.

Leadership and Communication: Courses focusing on leadership abilities, teamwork, and effective communication can help you hone vital soft skills for a successful Navy career. These skills are key to functioning efficiently in a military setting.

History and Political Science: A grasp of history, geopolitics, and international relations can provide essential context for military operations and decision-making. History and political science classes can help you understand the wider strategic environment in which the Navy functions.

Technology and Engineering: If you're interested in roles involving technology, engineering, or mechanics, classes in these areas can be beneficial. Knowledge of how different technologies operate and familiarity with engineering principles can be useful in specific Navy roles.

Navigation and Seamanship: For roles involving sea navigation, classes in navigation, seamanship, or maritime studies can equip you with the foundational knowledge relevant to naval operations.

By pursuing these studies, you can effectively prepare for a Navy career and bolster your skills and knowledge in areas valued in the military.

Key Resources Used:

U.S. Navy Official Website: The U.S. Navy's official website is a comprehensive source of information about recruitment requirements, training programs, and career paths in the Navy. It's a trusted resource for those interested in a Navy career.

Military.com: Military.com provides resources and guidance on military careers, including details on educational requirements, training opportunities, and advice for prospective service members. It's a credible source for anyone contemplating a military career.

Naval Education and Training Command (NETC): NETC develops training programs for the U.S. Navy. Their resources provide insights into the educational paths that can benefit those aiming to join the Navy and thrive in their military careers.

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
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