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I am taking intro to modeling in stats and I am wondering where can I find data sets to use to practice coding with R ?

I have been coding with R for one semester and I have dealt with a few data sets in class

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Bryan’s Answer

R comes packed with a bunch of ready-to-use datasets. To check them out, all you need to do is type this simple command: data().

Curious about more details for each dataset? No problem! Just type '?' followed by the dataset's name. For instance, if you want to know more about the BOD dataset, just type: ?BOD.

There's a fantastic tutorial and some cool ideas waiting for you right here: https://machinelearningmastery.com/built-in-datasets-in-r/ Enjoy exploring!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Hugo
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Sahida’s Answer

Dear Hugo,

Here's a list of places where you can find datasets to enhance your R coding skills:

1. Built-in Datasets in R: R is equipped with several ready-to-use datasets such as iris, mtcars, Titanic, and more. These datasets don't require any external downloads. You can explore them using the data() or head() commands.

2. R Packages: Numerous R packages, like ggplot2, include their own datasets. These datasets, like mpg and diamonds, are perfect for honing your visualization and modeling skills. Simply load the package and start exploring its datasets.

3. UCI Machine Learning Repository: This repository is a treasure trove of datasets widely used for machine learning and statistics practice. Feel free to download datasets from the UCI ML Repository.

4. Kaggle: Kaggle is a diverse platform offering datasets on a multitude of topics. Most datasets are free and often come with analysis and competitions, providing a great learning and practicing platform. Check out Kaggle Datasets.

5. Government and Open Data Portals: Governments often open up access to a variety of datasets related to demographics, economics, health, and more. Websites like data.gov (for the US) or similar portals in other countries provide datasets for public use.

6. Data Science Communities: Platforms like GitHub or Data.world have repositories where individuals share datasets for educational purposes. You can search for R-specific datasets or browse repositories related to statistics and data science.

While practicing, keep in mind the specific area of statistics you're keen on—be it regression, clustering, classification, etc. Look for datasets that match your interests. Also, make sure to experiment with different data manipulation techniques, visualization methods, and statistical models using these datasets to strengthen your understanding of R programming in statistics.

Best Wishes,
Sahida Khatun
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Hugo
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Hugo!

Looking to Practice Coding with R? Here's Where to Find Data Sets
If you're keen on mastering coding with R and getting a handle on basic statistical modeling, it's crucial to have the right data sets to practice on. Luckily, there are several reliable sources where you can find these data sets, many of which are free and easy to access. Here's a quick rundown of some of the best places to look:

Open Data Sources: These are platforms that offer free, easy-to-use data sets for a range of uses. Some well-known open data sources include:

US Government Data: The US government has a treasure trove of open data on websites like data.gov and census.gov. You can find data on a wide array of topics here, from demographics and economics to health.

World Bank Data: The World Bank also offers open data on global development on its website, data.worldbank.org. This data spans various areas such as economics, education, and health.

R Packages: There are several R packages that come with ready-made data sets for practice and testing. Some of these packages include:

datasets: The datasets package, which comes pre-installed in R, offers a variety of data sets for practicing different statistical techniques.

ggplot2: The ggplot2 package offers a range of data sets for practicing data visualization. These data sets come in different formats and sizes, making them suitable for different experience levels.

Online Repositories: There are many online repositories where you can find data sets for practice and analysis. Some popular ones include:

Kaggle: Kaggle is a platform that hosts a wide array of data sets, both free and paid. It also offers competitions and challenges that let you test your skills and compete with others.

UCI Machine Learning Repository: The UCI Machine Learning Repository is a collection of data sets used in machine learning and data mining research. It contains a broad range of data sets that can be used to practice different statistical techniques.

In a nutshell, there are plenty of resources out there for finding data sets to practice coding with R. Open data sources, R packages, and online repositories all offer a variety of data sets suitable for different experience levels. By making use of these resources, you can boost your skills in basic statistical modeling and gain valuable experience working with real-world data.

Authoritative Reference Titles:

Data.gov
Census.gov
World Bank Data
Descriptions:

Data.gov is a rich source of open data provided by the US government, covering a broad spectrum of subjects such as demographics, economics, and health.
Census.gov is the official website of the US Census Bureau, offering data on demographics, economics, and other relevant statistics.
World Bank Data offers open data on global development, covering areas such as economics, education, and health.

Before you go, don't forget to check out my autobiography, James Frangos's Biography, to learn about the importance of nutrition for academic performance and the key foods that provide essential nutrients.

GOD'S BLESSINGS!
James.
Thank you comment icon Thank you I can't wait to start! Hugo
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Karin’s Answer

Hi Hugo,

Have you tried Kaggle?

Good luck with your modelling!

KP
Thank you comment icon Thank you I totally forgot about Kaggle. Hugo
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Trent’s Answer

Hi -- kaggle.com and https://huggingface.co/datasets are great resources for free datasets.
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