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Will I get my dream job going to a smaller University?

I found the perfect college, the only problem is that I want to get a great high paying job when I get my diploma and I'm worried that going to a small school might limit my future job options.
#college #college-advice #psychology #future-careers

Thank you comment icon I suggest looking up that college's ROI (return on investment), and if you can, for your field/major specifically. Then you'll get an idea of how much graduates from that college earn in their career; of course, this estimate varies based on said graduates' job positions, companies, years of experience, etc. Look into what kind of companies most graduates there end up working for- do you find yourself compatible? These alumni can be your network if you attend that college, and become valuable connections and mentors should you attend there. Point is, don't let the college's small size stop you from looking deeper into their career opportunities. Clio

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Subject: Career question for you

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Paul A’s Answer

Hi Staci! Big difference between a job and a career. Your skill sets, life experience and courage will have more influence on your future life then your "first job" I say pick a school, big or small that "lights you up" when you go there. I went to a small school U of Puget Sound because it was near my home. Turned out to be the best place for me. What I discovered along my path was that I was built to be self employed but it took a roller coaster career ride to discover that. What you may discover along your journey is that "perfect" and high pay will be trumped by independence , self reliance and wanting a life not a life style. I say relax, pick a school that will enhance your personality, meet some good friends and stretch your current paradigm. The best! :-)
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Ken’s Answer

After spending many years in Human Resources and doing college recruiting I have discovered: The truth is that it really does not matter where you go to school. The most important things are how well you do and how well you do at networking. Here is an interesting site to visit: http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first and most important step is to get to know yourself and what might be a career area most suited for you. To do this it is best to take an Interest and Aptitude Test to determine what might be the career area best suited for your personality traits. When I was doing college recruiting, I encountered too many graduates who skipped this step and ended up on the job not liking or not comfortable with the practical application of the major which they had studied.
When you get a clearer idea of the area for which you are most suited, a good next step is to talk to the person in your school who tracks and works with graduates and arrange to meet and talk to and visit and shadow people who are doing what you think that you want to do, so that you can get a feel for what it is all about and how you feel about being in that career area. You favorite teachers can also help you to meet people in your career area of interest. Here are some good tips on getting helpful information: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-an-informational-interview-and-get-a-yes ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/fact-no-one-is-too-old-to-go-on-informational-interviews?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20170505&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20170505&bsft_eid=6a4d2e5e-dba0-477e-a79c-e3338f78fcea&bsft_clkid=347bdd51-58bd-4eee-a811-c69d5e6af824&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=3a747110-1284-458b-95f8-2c30e2985ca8 ##
80% of people who find jobs find them through networking as described above. In addition to the sources mentioned above, another source of information would be professional associations to which people working in your career area of interest belong. Identifying such associations and going to meetings to meet people working that career area will be a great benefit. Here are sites that will help you with that: Professional Associations ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## Networking: ## https://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-job-search-strategy-thatll-make-you-15-times-more-likely-to-be-hired ## Networking for Introverts ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/an-introverts-guide-to-networking ##
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Michele’s Answer

In short, yes. I studied at a small university in Grahamstown, South Africa (the total population of the town was less than 10,000). Through a combination of hard work and good luck, I landed a dream job as a senior associate in asset and wealth management in Chicago. It doesn't matter what school you go to; what's important is what you take out of it

Michele recommends the following next steps:

Reach out to alumni from your University to see what sort of careers they've built . LinkedIn is a great way to make connections and ask questions
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