15 answers
Updated Viewed 629 times Translate

Will school tuition be less in the future?

School has become a business here in the US. I have seen other countries and University tuition is not high. They want people to go to school and be educated. In addition, I have noticed the quality of teaching material is better as well as teaching methods. Is that going to get any better?#college #college-tuition #financial-aid #financial-planning


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
17
100% of 15 Pros

15 answers


Updated Translate

Ash’s Answer

Tuition has been increasing by 3 to 7% each year and it will only get expensive each year. If you want to go to college you need to carefully chose your major, and the college you go to, and how you pay for college and how much student loans you take on. College will put you into debt but if done the right way it can add tremendously to your income.

Ash recommends the following next steps:

Talk to me about this for free consultation. My number is 419-3782441.
Saved!

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Matthew’s Answer

Great question. Countries with lower tuition costs tend to have higher levels of taxation. For example, Denmark offers free tuition for students...and residents pay 40% or more of their income in taxes. For the US to lower tuition costs, taxation must increase. Would you rather pay more for college today, or more taxes later? It is a difficult question to answer. Americans have become accustomed to lower tax rates, it wonder why our services suffer.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Nicole’s Answer

Hello Dulce,


This is a great question. Unfortunately trends continue to show that college tuition increase yearly. A recent study showed that tuition rised 5% annually over the last two years. Here is good report that is very informative on this topic:

https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/2017-trends-in-college-pricing_0.pdf


1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Sheila’s Answer

Hi Dulcce:

I'd like to provide you with some additional information. Here are highlights from College Board Annual Trend on College Pricing and Student Aid report (10/19/2018). . .

  • Average published in-state tuition and fees in the public four-year sector increased by $250 (2.5 percent), from $9,980 in 2017-18 to $10,230 in 2018-19. Average total tuition and fee and room and board charges in 2018-19 are $21,370.
  • Average published in-district tuition and fees at public two-year colleges increased by $100 (2.8 percent) from $3,560 in 2017-18 to $3660 in 2018-19.
  • In the public two-year and private nonprofit four-year sectors, published prices are more than twice as high in 2018-19 as they were in 1988-89. The average in-state tuition and fee price in the public four-year sector is about three times as high in inflation-adjusted dollars as it was in 1988-89.
  • Overall, two-year colleges accounted for 43 percent of the public full-time equivalent undergraduate enrollment in 2016. In seven states, this share was 50 percent or more.

With the cost of tuition rising continuously, I recommend that you start searching for scholarships and grants early. For starters you could check with your Counselor. Also, remember to look in all places because you never know where financial aid funds may come from (ie, church, friends, family, donations, work, etc.) . I wish you much success on your journey.

~ Sheila

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Check with your Counselor for scholarships and grants information
Saved!
Check with your parents to see if their company offer scholarships to high school graduates. If they do offer, apply for them. Make sure to get the paperwork in on time and be aware of the deadline
Saved!
Review the College Board report - - https://www.higheredtoday.org/2018/10/19/college-board-releases-annual-trends-college-pricing-student-aid-reports/
Saved!
Review CNBC.com article - - https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/29/how-much-college-tuition-has-increased-from-1988-to-2018.html
Saved!

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Tristen’s Answer

Definitely not. On average Tuition rises 3-4% a year. Only lately has that spiked mainly due to the internet and other factors. I would try to find a career that you enjoy and either stick with it or be happy with changing careers every few years

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Chantz’s Answer

No it's not going to get better.


1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Audie’s Answer

First of all, I believe the overall problem is caused by two basic concepts. Number on is inflation. Our currency will continue to lose its purchasing power as our government continue to stimulate or print more money into the economy by way of the Federal Reserve System. Basically, as we continue to lose purchasing-power in our dollar. It will cost much more for students to afford to attend colleges and universities.

The seconds concept occurs because most students do not receive enough grants or scholarship funds to pay for college. All federal students loans are guarantee default by the government. Simply meaning the universities know a great percentage of that loan borrowed by the student will be automatically paid to the school but if there is a default. The burden of financial responsibility will be incurred by the borrower the student to pay back the loan plus penalties and interest.

This process will encourage higher cost for education because the academic institutions are insured to receive funds guaranteed by the government but the student will be stuck with the bill upon six-months of completing their degree.

0
Updated Translate

Jacob’s Answer

Research indicates costs could be triple what they are now in the next ~20 years

0
Updated Translate

sandra’s Answer

Schools use the school tuition to take care of their buildings. I think that school tuition will be more in the future because with time the value of money decreases. So if you are a new student , I advise you to apply for scholarships and have a good GPA.


0
Updated Translate

Maylan’s Answer

It's unlikely tuition will be less due to several factors: inflation, demand and the future of the labor market. Inflation affects purchasing power, which means for people and businesses to remain profitable and retain their purchasing power, prices must go up. Secondly, demand for college degrees is still high. Finally, the labor market factors into the aforementioned factor. Technological advancements have been making highly skilled workers a necessity in the future labor market. For people to be protected against recessions, they must have advanced degrees or participate in a niche apprenticeship sponsored by a company. Due to these factors, it is likely tuition will climb higher, but at what rate, only market forces will can tell.

0
Updated Translate

David’s Answer

College tuition in the United States has been built upon a 3 pillar approach. This system has created one of the most admired higher education systems on the planet, and has only been challenged recently as the "pillars" have developed a few cracks. Those 3 sources have been (1) tuition; (2) state support; and (3) federal support. Originally, many institutions of higher education also used philanthropy to create further financial resources, and some of these programs used endowments or financial assistance programs to modify increasing pressure on tuition. However, the trend for more than half a century has been an erosion of support coming from pillars (2) and (3). Philanthropy hasn't been as reliable for all institutions of higher education, so overall tuition is increasing and will continue to increase for brick-and-mortar education. However, in spite of often negative perceptions of online instruction, we are seeing a revolution take place for online instruction. With cutting edge advancements in technologies, including recording capabilities and Learning Management Software (LMS), we have some other options to see reduction in tuition. Like all revolutions, change doesn't come easily and many established higher education systems are fighting this development. How much such options help reduce tuition and create more universal access is difficult to predict, but there is no going back.

0
Updated Translate

Rita’s Answer

That is a sticky question. With unions controlling teacher's benefits, salaries, and pensions, tuition will continue to climb. In addition, tenure is also a factor, which drives tuition higher. Lower tuition in other countries is driven by higher taxation. The current administration is calling for a more socialist government which will continue to raise taxes to provide lower cost services. In light of this, even if the tuition costs are lower, you have much less money in your pocket due to higher tax rates.

There is no easy answer other than to look at how much you will benefit from going to college, meaning what is the ROI on the cost. Look at technical schools to learn a trade, which has much lower tuition. CNC operators, electricians, plumbers, mechanics, laborers, etc can make six figures.

Other options to lower costs are to take college level courses that transfer in high school, and attend a local college for the first two years to complete an associates degree and then a four year college to complete a Bachelor's degree. If you want to move into a management level position you will need to complete a Master's degree, which requires even higher tuitions. Earning a scholarship will lower costs, so look at what scholarships are offered by your preferred college and make the effort to earn it. Employers also offer tuition assistance for employees wanting to move up in the company. Scholarships are also offered by many non profit organizations. Do the research to see what you can take advantage of.




0
Updated Translate

Simeon’s Answer

Aside from some ground-breaking legislation getting passed in the coming years, I would bet that the trend of colleges being expensive is going to continue for the years to come. I would recommend considering community college, scholarships, work studies, and other ways to reduce the cost of going to college. For most fields, you don't have to go to a prestigious college to succeed. The most important thing is networking when it comes to career success, so just make sure you reach out to people while in college and keep an eye out for good internships.

0
Updated Translate

Alberto’s Answer

I have been a middle school teacher for four years in Los Angeles . I learned a lot of things during those years - dedicated teachers have a lot of stress following state teaching guidelines; most of which are made up by PH Ds (highly educated individuals). Sometimes those guidelines don't allow instructors to have time to know each of the students in her or his class.

Getting back to your question, let me say that school is getting more expensive in every country. I have a step son who is going to school in Mexico to become a doctor. Tuition is expensive there too because of inflation among many other things. We hope he reaches his dream of becoming a doctor here in the U.S.A. in the near future.

One advice to students would be to be focused and put an extra effort in what you are learning in elementary, middle school or high school because everyone suffers when we don't give it 100%.

Another advice would be finding your interest in a career you would like early in life; even if you think it's too expensive or too difficult you need to first aim high and expect good things to come out of that decision.

I hope this helped!




0
Updated Translate

Matthew’s Answer

Great question. Countries with lower tuition costs tend to have higher levels of taxation. For example, Denmark offers free tuition for students...and residents pay 40% or more of their income in taxes. For the US to lower tuition costs, taxation must increase. Would you rather pay more for college today, or more taxes later? It is a difficult question to answer. Americans have become accustomed to lower tax rates, it wonder why our services suffer.

0