7 answers
Updated Viewed 1141 times Translate

What's the most efficient way to ensure a successful transition from high school to college, and from college into the workforce?

I'm slightly anxious about the transitions between each big step, and it'd be nice to receive some support on what to expect/what steps I should take to ensure that I make the most out of my time in college. #management #career-path #life-transitions


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
9
100% of 8 Pros
100% of 1 Students

7 answers


Updated Translate

Katelyn’s Answer

Juan,


Making a plan when going into college and then out into the workforce is a good idea. Just be aware that your plan may change depending on what the future brings, and that is okay! The best way to transition into college is at the pace you feel comfortable, some people want to jump right in and move far away from their parents, others prefer to stay closer to home and take their time settling. All options are okay, just do what works best for you. I would suggest joining a club when your school starts or an organization. This is a great way to meet people and feel active in your school. Plus, it will help you begin that college resume. The same thing is useful when preparing for the workforce. Join an organization that fits your field, volunteer in that field and/or work a part-time job. The faster you build up transferable skills, the faster you will be seen as professionally beneficial and wanted by a company/organization. Hope that helps get you started! Good luck.


Thanks, Katelyn! This is definitely beneficial. I'm not necessarily anxious about developing relationships as much as I am about getting used to the college environment (especially since I come from a school with less than 600 kids total). I really appreciate your help! Juan T.

2
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Kenya’s Answer

The transistion between high school and college was definately a very confusing jump for me. I am currently a junior at UNLV for computer engineering and I find it is always easier to not stress over the transistion, but to figure out what you truly want to major in once reaching college. The first major difference between the two honestly is the class sizes. At UNLV my general education classes usually round off at about 30-40 students which can make it hard to stay ontop of things if you aren't a true "teachers pet" as everyone would say. Also, college is the truest test of ambition there is. I know in high school teachers have alot more time usually to actually tutor and mentor you when you don't do homework, but professors dont usually take time to single you out if you don't make your presence known which can suck sometimes if you're falling behind. My best advice when it comes to this would be NEVER LOSE FOCUS BUT HAVE FUN. College is a great place to learn more about yourself as well as your interest. With all the activities and classes going on around you it can be difficult to keep up which can postpone you graduating on time. Once you get the hang of being independent in college, transitioning into the workforce becomes that much more easier due to you already having some confidence and a clear idea of some sort of what you want to work on and do as far as a career.
Don't give up!


1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Janean’s Answer

My high school had 200 kids... Then I went to a big University and was completely overwhelmed on my first day. I kept getting lost trying to find my classrooms and definitely wasn't used to lectures with hundreds of people. Nothing wrong with walking around your school and figuring out where your classes are before the semester starts if you are worried about that. It's a big change, but an exciting one if you just embrace the experiences that will come your way and use the time to get to know who you are. As for work I'd recommend co-op or internship programs. They look great on your resume when you are job hunting later and it's a good way to ease into the working world in your area of study. Most importantly cut yourself a bit of slack. After about a month or two it will feel like you've been in college forever and you'll be more comfortable.


0
Updated Translate

Shawna’s Answer

It really depends on what type of college you are looking at attending. If you're going to attend a school where none of your fellow high school classmates are attending then finding on campus clubs/organizations to join are an excellent way to meet people with similar interests. You will no doubt meet a ton of people from living in the dorms or other on campus housing if you choose to live there. For the first year I would recommend it even if it close to home to get the full college experience.


The best advice I can give to transition from college to career would be an internship, especially in that last year or last semester. Many people end of getting offered full time positions with the company that they interned with if they showed promise and drive. If an internship doesn't interest you I would suggest going to career fairs as you get closer towards graduation and really making social contacts while your in school to get a jump on the career world.


0
Updated Translate

Julie’s Answer

Transitions can be challenging, but also exciting -- a time to gain new skills, new relationships, and new perspectives on where you want to go. Going from high school to college, you'll need to be more self-directed (as Kenya noted above), and advocate for yourself if you need additional help (for example, going to office hours for a challenging class or seeking out guidance on course selection). I would also second the advice about early work experiences being a helpful bridge to post-college employment -- look for volunteer experiences, summer jobs, internships, or part-time work as you're going through college that can help you explore possible paths and build your skills. If you have more specific questions about these transitions, please feel free to ask!


0
Updated Translate

Jennifer’s Answer

Hi Juan
If you are going to live on a College campus the best advice I can give you is get involved in the school activities by do some volunteering. If you have never spent time away from your parents then being homesick is a real possibility. The way to combat this is stay busy. College isn't just learning by books, it is also learning to adapt to your surroundings and growing up. Ask the school conselors what activities to join and make it something that can be rewarding to you.


Good luck.


0
Updated Translate

Jody’s Answer

while making the transition from college to the work force i would highly suggest an intership in the field you are majoring in, it's such a great hands on experience and way to figure out which role in that field would fit you best.


0