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How can I become more joyous when I have to physically cut into someone for their own health and not be grossed out?

I am in the 8th Grade trying to find a better way to become more happy and less grossed out.

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Godfrey’s Answer

That's a good concern
Doctors just don't cut into patients bodies without any rationale.
The surgeries are basically done to aid in the surgical intervention and aid in treatment for the patients conditions.
It's also done as per the evidence based medical interventions with the latest technology available like laser surgery, laparoscopic surgery among other latest technology.
Pain also is addressed by using anaesthesia to relieve patient from pain during the surgical procedures.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Santonio,

Embracing the joy in performing medical procedures without feeling squeamish

It's perfectly normal to feel uneasy at the sight of blood and body tissues, especially as an 8th grader. However, if you're aiming for a career in medicine, it's crucial to rise above these feelings and adopt a professional approach. Here are some actionable steps to help you find joy and reduce discomfort:

Recognize the significance of the procedure: Understand that the procedure you're performing is vital for the patient's health and happiness. Concentrate on the positive outcome of your actions rather than the unsettling aspects.

Practice makes perfect: The more you rehearse and prepare, the more at ease you'll feel. Learn about the tools, body structures, and techniques involved in the procedure. This knowledge will boost your confidence and reduce nervousness.

Embrace mindfulness and meditation: Practicing mindfulness helps you stay in the moment and diminishes feelings of anxiety and revulsion. Meditation can also foster compassion and empathy for your patients, making the experience more fulfilling.

Engage in positive self-talk: Use uplifting self-talk to boost your confidence and drive. Remind yourself that you are skilled, competent, and making a real difference in people's lives.

Seek advice and support: Discuss your feelings with mentors, teachers, or peers. They can offer advice, encouragement, and tactics to help you manage your anxiety and revulsion.

Gradual exposure: Slowly expose yourself to situations that provoke your discomfort. Begin with simulated procedures or observing surgeries from afar, then progressively get closer as you grow more comfortable.

Take care of yourself: Ensure you're looking after your physical and emotional well-being. Get sufficient sleep, exercise regularly, maintain a healthy diet, and participate in activities that bring you joy and relaxation.

Remember, developing a professional approach to medical procedures requires time and practice. Be patient with yourself, seek help when necessary, and keep your focus on the positive outcomes of your actions. In time, you'll find more comfort and joy in your role as a medical professional.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine.
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Junied’s Answer

It's natural to feel uneasy about the idea of performing medical procedures, especially when they involve cutting into someone's body. To become more comfortable and joyful in such situations, consider the following steps:

Understanding and Education: Educate yourself about the human body and the purpose behind medical procedures. Understanding the anatomy and physiology can help demystify the process and make it feel less intimidating.

Desensitization: Gradually expose yourself to images, videos, and simulations of medical procedures to desensitize yourself to the sight of blood and surgical tools. Start with less intense visuals and gradually work your way up as you become more comfortable.

Mindfulness and Relaxation Techniques: Practice mindfulness and relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, or visualization, to calm your nerves and manage any feelings of anxiety or disgust before and during medical procedures.

Focus on the Outcome: Remind yourself of the positive impact that your actions will have on the patient's health and well-being. Keeping the patient's best interests in mind can help you stay focused and motivated during medical procedures.

Seek Support and Guidance: Don't hesitate to reach out to mentors, teachers, or healthcare professionals for guidance and support. They can provide valuable advice, share their experiences, and offer strategies for coping with any challenges you may encounter.

Practice Empathy and Compassion: Cultivate empathy and compassion for your patients by putting yourself in their shoes and recognizing the importance of your role in providing them with quality healthcare. Focusing on the human aspect of medicine can help shift your perspective and enhance your sense of fulfillment and joy in helping others.

By taking proactive steps to understand, manage, and overcome your feelings of discomfort and grossness, you can become more confident, joyful, and effective in performing medical procedures for the benefit of others' health and well-being.
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Martin’s Answer

Fantastic inquiry! There's no one-size-fits-all answer here, as we're all unique in our own ways. The key is that you've chosen this path to assist, and you're fully committed to it, setting your personal concerns aside. This is a skill that's acquired over time, though admittedly, some people never quite master it.

Consider surgery, for instance. The various drapes and coverings around the surgical site aren't just for infection prevention or maintaining sterility. They also serve to abstract the reality that you're operating on another human being, allowing you to focus solely on the organs at hand. This heightened focus helps to dispel any feelings of discomfort or disgust.

As for certain aspects like unpleasant smells, you learn to compartmentalize and deal with them later. You'll eventually develop your own coping mechanisms, and though it might take longer for some, you'll overcome any initial squeamishness. The spotlight is on the patient and the task before you; everything else can be dealt with later, if needed. So, keep going, you're doing great!
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