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How do I find a job as a stable hand ?

Hi! I graduate high school next spring and want to work as a stable hand/groomer in the Midwest/ south US. Does anyone have advice with how to find a job or any connections that might be looking for help around then? Side note: I don’t want to go to college or further school for equestrians. Also it doesn’t just have to be horses though I do prefer them. I am a hard worker and energetic and happy person. Thanks for reading!

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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Carolyn !

Although there are currently no openings for stable work in your town right now, that doesn't mean that there won't be in the future so it would be a good idea to have a prepared resume that will target the job. The salary is usually not too high for these jobs, so you also may want to build skills for a second interest you may have, too. A lot of times, people who own the stables have family or someone who they've known for a while do the work around a ranch, stable or farm and sometimes they hire people.

The more you know about equestrian services, equipment, tack and management and ranches, the more your chances would increase in obtaining a job on a ranch or stable. It doesn't require a college degree, rather on the job training for the particulars that the owner wants. Some tasks you would be expected to do would be cleaning the stalls. That includes mucking out the stalls (cleaning waste) and cleaning horse equipment, barn and facility maintenance, too. You'd also be expected to medicate, treat and groom horses. You will need to water the horses and animals which means both providing them water to drink as well as watering them down at times to groom them. Another thing involved is mowing the grounds. The hours are long and you will have to be able to tolerate extreme weather sometimes. Anything that you can put on your resume that indicates your experience and ability to do these tasks will be helpful.

I would advise volunteering at one of your local sites for experience. Get the feel of the work and grounds and since you do not want to attend college or vocational school, I would advise reading about the work and how to work with horses and any other animals that may be on the site. Horses need very special care and an expert touch. I have left a list of stables and ranches below that are in your local area. I advise that you get the experience first locally so that you can see if it is something that you are going to stay with long term. If you are going to relocate for this work specifically as you've indicated in your inquiry, do a search for the sites to apply to and set up an interview for when you arrive there. Remember that the hours are long and the pay is low. Volunteering first would be a good idea because when you go on an interview and they ask if you have experience, you can say yes.

I hope that this is of some help to you in your plans and I wish you all the best !

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

STABLES AND RANCHES IN GRAND JUNCTION https://www.yellowpages.com/grand-junction-co/horseback-riding-stables
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Alexandra M. S.’s Answer

I would use Google Maps to locate farms in your area that you could commute to, and see if there is a phone number or website. I think if you contacted one directly, they would be happy to tell you whether they need a hand and what kind of help it may be. Good luck!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Carolyn,

To secure a job as a stable hand or groomer in the Midwest or Southern US, follow these actionable steps:

1. Draft a compelling resume: Showcase any experience you have with horses, underscore your robust work ethic, vitality, and upbeat demeanor. Even without formal experience, include volunteer work, personal horse-related activities, or relevant skills like horse care, grooming, or handling.

2. Utilize online job platforms: Websites such as Indeed, Glassdoor, and Monster frequently post stable hand vacancies. Use search terms like “stable hand,” “groomer,” “horse caretaker,” and “equine facility” to find appropriate job listings. Filter results by location to focus on the Midwest or Southern US.

3. Reach out to local stables and farms: Contact equine facilities directly to inquire about potential job openings. Locate these places through online searches, local horse clubs, or word-of-mouth in your community. Be ready to articulate your interest in the role and your qualifications.

4. Connect with equine professionals: Participate in local horse shows, events, or clinics to network with industry insiders who can assist you in your job search. Stable managers, trainers, and horse enthusiasts often have valuable connections and may be open to sharing advice or opportunities.

5. Explore internships or apprenticeships: Some stables or farms may provide internships or apprenticeships for those eager to gain field experience. These programs offer valuable hands-on training and could potentially lead to full-time jobs.

6. Leverage social media platforms: Horse-related groups on Facebook and other social media can be a rich source of job opportunities. Join region-specific or interest-specific groups and watch for posts from stables or farms seeking staff.

7. Engage with your local 4-H or FFA chapters: If you’re a member of these organizations, they can be a powerful resource for job opportunities in the equine industry. Consult your club leaders or advisors about any available positions or potential employer connections.

8. Stay determined and adaptable: Job hunting requires persistence and patience. Continue your search for opportunities and remain open to various positions within the equine industry. As you accumulate more experience, you'll be better positioned to find a stable hand job that aligns with your interests and career aspirations.

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! This was actually helpful. Carolyn
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