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Polydactyly

I wanted to ask if a person with polydactyly can become a doctor or researcher.. because you have to wear gloves and it might be a little hard with six fingers

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Subject: Career question for you

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Tracy’s Answer

Hello

Just one statement to that, absolutely you can. I’ve heard of a surgeon who was paralyzed from the knee down but still found a way to do surgeries. You shouldn’t let anything limit you if that is truly your passion. Go for it. You just might be the motivation or encouragement someone else is looking for.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. S
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear S,

Absolutely, an individual with polydactyly, the condition of having an extra digit on the hands or feet, can certainly aspire to become a doctor or researcher. This physical peculiarity, present from birth, may pose some unique challenges such as finding suitable gloves, but it does not restrict one's potential to excel in the medical or research fields.

There are numerous specialties within the medical profession that do not demand extensive manual dexterity, or where adjustments can be made to accommodate those with physical variations. For instance, a doctor specialising in fields like psychiatry, radiology, pathology, public health, or medical research may not encounter significant hurdles due to polydactyly.

Moreover, the progression of technology and the availability of adaptive tools can aid those with polydactyly in carrying out tasks that necessitate fine motor skills. In situations where precise hand movements are essential, such as in surgery, doctors with polydactyly can collaborate with their teams to devise solutions that allow them to perform proficiently.

In essence, the decision to pursue a career as a doctor or researcher should not be impeded by polydactyly. With commitment, enthusiasm, and the backing of peers and institutions, individuals with polydactyly can thrive in the medical and research sectors just like anyone else.

I have referred to the following top 3 authoritative sources to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided on polydactyly and its impact on a medical or research career:

1. Mayo Clinic
2. National Institutes of Health (NIH)
3. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
Thank you comment icon this was very helpful, thank you so much for your detailed answer! have a good day! S
Thank you comment icon That is what you will get everytime - prompt service! James Constantine Frangos
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Karin’s Answer

Hi S,

Interesting question! I never thought of it this way. Special gloves should absolutely be available. If they are not available, you should campaigne to normalize fitting gloves for anyone. It's not even a "disability" that would hinder you in any way, just a different development.

I found this sources for custom gloves:

https://www.imv-technologies.com/product/sterile-polytactyl-glove

All the best! Become an awesome doctor or researcher!

KP
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I'll definitely try to work hard so that everyone normalize it! thank you for sharing the site for the gloves! Hope you have a good day! S
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome! Karin P.
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Jason’s Answer

Having polydactyly doesn't stand in the way of becoming a surgeon. In such situations, the law mandates employers to make necessary adjustments or accommodations.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! S
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