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Who should I go to for college advice at school?

Highschool Student

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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Dr. Tulsi’s Answer

Hey there! So, when it comes to getting college advice, you've got a bunch of options right at your fingertips at school. Here's who you can turn to:

School Counselor:
Your school counselor is like your personal college guru. They're trained to help students navigate the ins and outs of the college application process. They can assist you with things like choosing the right courses, understanding admission requirements, exploring college options, and applying for financial aid. Plus, they're there to provide support and guidance whenever you need it.

Teachers:
Your teachers know you well, both academically and personally. They can offer valuable insights into your strengths and areas for improvement, which can help you identify colleges that align with your interests and goals. They may also be able to write you letters of recommendation, which are often required as part of the college application process.

College Advisors or Coordinators:
Some schools have dedicated college advisors or coordinators whose sole job is to help students with college-related matters. These individuals are typically well-versed in the college admissions process and can provide personalized guidance tailored to your needs and aspirations. They may organize college fairs, workshops, and information sessions to help you explore your options and make informed decisions.

Upperclassmen:
Talking to older students who have already gone through the college application process can give you a firsthand perspective on what to expect. They can share their experiences, offer tips and advice, and answer any questions you may have. They've been in your shoes and can provide valuable insights into everything from choosing a college to managing the transition to campus life.

Alumni:
Alumni from your school who have attended college can offer valuable advice and mentorship. They can share their experiences, offer guidance on choosing colleges and majors, and provide valuable networking opportunities. Alumni may also be willing to review your college essays, conduct mock interviews, or provide other forms of support to help you succeed in the college admissions process.

Family and Friends:
Don't underestimate the power of support from your family and friends. They know you well and can offer encouragement, reassurance, and advice as you navigate the college application process. Whether it's helping you brainstorm essay topics, proofreading your application materials, or simply providing a listening ear, their support can make a big difference.

Online Resources:
The internet is full of resources to help you research colleges, prepare for standardized tests, write your college essays, and more. Websites like College Board, Khan Academy, and the Common Application offer a wealth of information and tools to help you plan for college. You can also join online forums, social media groups, and college-related websites to connect with other students, ask questions, and share advice and experiences.

By tapping into these resources, you can gather a wealth of information and support to help you navigate the college application process with confidence and ease.

So, don't be afraid to reach out and ask for help. There are plenty of people who want to see you succeed and are ready to lend a hand along the way!

Hope this helps! and good luck :)
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ian’s Answer

Jot down your questions, and get answers by:

Talking to your school counselor or teachers.
Checking out colleges’ student blogs, if available.
Contacting college admissions officials directly or through tools like our Connect with Colleges feature
Asking admissions officials to recommend current students or recent graduates to talk to.
Visiting college campuses, if possible. For more information, see the Campus Visit Checklist.
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