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How do I get my RN degree in high school?

I am in high school. How would I get my RN degree?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Karissa’s Answer

You can't. Very few people skip several grades before high school. If you did then this answer does not apply to you. You can get an associates degree in biology along with a high school diploma. This would mean you only have to do 2 years at a 4-year university after high school. There are other nursing degrees but RN's go to college for 4 years. Two of those years must be at a 4-year university. If you live in a rural area you may not have access to a community college or a plethora of AP classes. If that is the case you cannot get college credits in high school.
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Patrick’s Answer

Brianna, securing your Registered Nurse (RN) degree during your high school years is indeed a lofty aspiration. However, with meticulous organization and unwavering commitment, it's absolutely attainable via several routes. Drawing on the advice given by my aunt and uncle, both nurses, here's a comprehensive guide to help you navigate your way to an RN degree while still in high school:

* Start by investigating RN programs available at various colleges and universities. Seek out programs that cater to high school students, like dual enrollment or early admission schemes. These programs enable you to commence college-level studies while still in high school, earning credits that contribute to your RN degree.

* Most RN programs require prerequisite courses to be completed before application. These courses usually involve biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, and other science-related subjects. Collaborate with your high school guidance counselor to ensure you're on the right path to meet these prerequisites.

* Look into dual enrollment schemes offered by local colleges or universities. These schemes permit high school students to undertake college courses while still attending high school. By joining a dual enrollment scheme, you can start accumulating college credits that contribute to your RN degree prior to your high school graduation.

* Utilize Advanced Placement (AP) courses available at your high school. AP courses enable you to gain college credit by sitting exams at the end of the school year. Many RN programs recognize AP credits, which can help you fast-track your journey towards your degree.

* Some colleges propose accelerated RN programs specifically tailored for high-achieving students. These programs might allow you to finish your RN degree in less time by undertaking an intensive course load and/or participating in summer sessions.

* Concentrate on keeping a robust academic record throughout high school. Your GPA and standardized test scores (like the SAT or ACT) will play a significant role in college admissions, including for RN programs. Strive to excel in your studies and engage in extracurricular activities that showcase your leadership, teamwork, and dedication to the healthcare sector.

* Think about gaining experience in the healthcare sector through volunteering, internships, or part-time jobs. This experience not only enhances your college applications but also offers valuable insights into the healthcare industry and helps you affirm your passion for a career as an RN.

* Once you've fulfilled the necessary prerequisite courses and earned college credits via dual enrollment or AP courses, apply to RN programs that resonate with your ambitions and interests. Ensure to meet application deadlines and submit all necessary documents, including transcripts, recommendation letters, and personal statements.

By adhering to these steps and keeping your goals in sight, you can set yourself up for success in securing your RN degree while still in high school. Remember to stay organized, seek advice from mentors and advisors, and stay dedicated to your academic and career goals in the healthcare sector.
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Ollie’s Answer

Hi Brianna, here is the short answer to your question. After graduating high school, you will have to complete an accredited Nursing program. You have 2 options: earning an associate's degree (ADN), in 2 years, or a bachelor's degree (BSN) in 4 years and then pass your state's licensure exam to be employed as a nurse. Some states may only consider graduates with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing for nursing positions, but not all. If education costs are an issue, you should research your state's licensure requirements for Nursing to confirm that your state will license associate degree holders who pass the exam. Work with your high school guidance counselor to see what community colleges in your area offer a 2-year nursing program. This will be a shorter & less expensive route. You can later earn your bachelor's degree when employed as a nurse. This will allow you to take advantage of deductible educational expenses on your federal taxes, increase your employability & get a higher nursing salary as a BSN. Also, some large employers (mainly hospitals due to nursing shortages) offer a "tuition reimbursement" plan for employees to encourage career advancement. In this case, you would have to pay the tuition out-of-pocket, submit a passing final course grade/transcript to Human Resources, and your employer would reimburse you for the expense. I'm a retired high school guidance counselor and a few of my former students had success with this method. Good luck!
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