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How can I become a plumber what education would I need after high school? Is this a good job if you want to make good money from a trade? If I do decide to get into this trade what would my working conditions be like, and would it be able to support me financially?

high school, Massachusetts, junior

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Justin’s Answer

Ok so let's start with the you need to attend tech school, community college, or some other nonsense about becoming a plumber. When I started my career as someone off the street applying to an ad in the paper to become an apprentice, that's all I did was apply for the job. I wasn't about to dump money into more schooling for something I wasn't sure I would like. So I get told be at this address on Monday and you will learn from there. I started in residential new construction so I was given the current house my journeyman was working in. When I met him he asked if I had any plumbing knowledge or background I said no. So he started me off with running water lines through holes he had already prepped and then gave me a shovel to dig when needed for the sewer. I learned from him on the job and then went to apprentice school my county required and the employer paid for it. SO you just need to find someone looking for an apprentice to get started, then you can figure out what schooling is required.

Plumbing can be a good paying career, but this will take time and depend on where you find yourself. New construction doesn't pay the big money unless you get into the union. Or you can get into a service company and climb the ranks to become a manager which will bring increased pay. Then there's working in hospitals or jails and they have their own pay which can be good or not. It all a journey that you will need to take on and find your way to a job that will see your valve and pay for it.

Working conditions depend on where you find yourself such as new construction you will be in the elements most of the time. That means the heat, snow, rain you will be in it all so dress appropriately. If get into service work then you have a mix of being in the elements and people's homes or business. Now if you get into a hospital the environment is a lot different since you don't need to worry about the elements as much, and then the scope of work is service related.
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JOHN’s Answer

Hello:

"Certifications are important for plumbers in the job market because they show a level of expertise and commitment to their craft. Certification programs demonstrate that a plumber has the necessary knowledge, skills, and experience to perform specific tasks.":
https://resumecat.com/blog/plumber-certifications

"While completing your studies, it might be beneficial to build your problem-solving and critical thinking skills, as plumbers may use these abilities to interpret plans, repair faulty equipment, and determine the best configurations for pipes and plumbing equipment. Some plumbing apprenticeships also require a solid understanding of math.".
- https://ca.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/plumbing-certifications

"How to Pursue Plumbing Certifications (With Steps)":
https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/finding-a-job/how-to-become-plumbing-apprentice

Thankful within every path your steps unwrap.

God Bless,

John German
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Sudha Rani’s Answer

Stepping into the world of plumbing involves a blend of education, training, and apprenticeship. Here's a friendly guide to what you might encounter on this journey:

Education and Training: Once you've graduated high school, you have two main options. You can either join a vocational training program or sign up for a plumbing apprenticeship. Many trade schools and community colleges offer plumbing programs that mix classroom learning with practical training. Alternatively, you can learn on the job with a licensed plumber or plumbing company. This way, you'll gain hands-on experience and earn money at the same time.

Licensing: In most places, you'll need a license to be a plumber. The requirements for this license can vary, but usually, you'll need to complete an apprenticeship, pass a licensing exam, and meet any other state-specific requirements.

Job Outlook and Earnings: Plumbing can be a profitable career, especially if you're good at what you do and gain experience over time. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that the median annual wage for plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters was $56,330 in May 2020, with the top 10% earning over $97,170. The job market for plumbers is also promising, with employment expected to grow 4% from 2019 to 2029, about as fast as the average for all jobs.

Working Conditions: As a plumber, you could find yourself working in a variety of places, from residential homes and commercial buildings to industrial facilities. The job can be physically challenging, with tasks like kneeling, bending, and lifting heavy items. Depending on the job, you might work in tight spaces or outdoors. Plumbers often need to be on call for emergencies and may work irregular hours, including evenings, weekends, and holidays, to fix plumbing issues as they come up.

Financial Stability: Plumbing can provide a steady income, especially once you've made a name for yourself in the industry. Skilled plumbers are always needed to maintain and repair plumbing systems in homes, businesses, and public infrastructure. As you gain experience and build a reputation as a dependable and skilled plumber, you might have the chance to earn higher wages, start your own plumbing business, or specialize in a specific area of the trade.

In conclusion, becoming a plumber can be a satisfying career choice, offering steady work, competitive pay, and the joy of helping people solve their plumbing problems and maintain vital infrastructure. If you're interested in the trade and ready to put in the time and effort to learn and perfect the skills, plumbing could be a fulfilling and financially rewarding career for you. Best of luck on your journey!
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DeAndrea’s Answer

You'd need to attend trade school to acquire the necessary knowledge. This is a great career choice and can be very lucrative as you are providing a service to customers and this is a trade that will never go away. You have the option to work with a company to gain more hands on experience and/or if you feel you are confident to venture out on your own that is another option. I'd definitely recommend working under those that have done the job for awhile and after a few years or so, you can start your own company if you decide to do so.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Collin,

Becoming a Plumber: Education and Career Outlook

Education Requirements: To become a plumber, you typically need to complete a combination of education and on-the-job training. After high school, you can pursue one of the following paths:

Vocational Training: Many plumbers start their careers by enrolling in a vocational or technical school that offers plumbing programs. These programs usually last anywhere from several months to two years and provide hands-on training in plumbing techniques, tools, and materials.

Apprenticeship: Another common route is to enter a plumbing apprenticeship program. These programs are often sponsored by trade unions or plumbing companies and involve working under the supervision of experienced plumbers while also taking related classroom instruction. Apprenticeships typically last 4-5 years.

Licensing: In most states, plumbers are required to be licensed. Licensing requirements vary by state but generally involve passing an exam after completing the necessary education and training.

Job Outlook and Salary Potential: Plumbing can be a lucrative career choice in the trades industry. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual wage for plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters was $55,160 in May 2020. The job outlook for plumbers is also positive, with a projected growth rate of 4% from 2019 to 2029, which is about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Working Conditions: As a plumber, your working conditions can vary depending on the type of projects you work on. Some common aspects of working conditions for plumbers include:

Physical Demands: Plumbing work can be physically demanding, requiring strength and stamina to lift heavy materials and work in tight spaces.

Work Environment: Plumbers may work indoors or outdoors, depending on the project. They may work in residential homes, commercial buildings, or industrial settings.

Schedule: Plumbers may work regular business hours or have to respond to emergencies outside of normal working hours.

Financial Support: Plumbing can provide financial stability for those who excel in the field. With experience and expertise, plumbers can earn competitive wages and potentially start their own businesses. Additionally, skilled trades like plumbing are always in demand, which can offer job security.

In conclusion, pursuing a career as a plumber can be a rewarding choice that offers good earning potential and job stability if you are willing to invest in the necessary education and training.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The BLS provides comprehensive data on occupational outlooks, including information on job prospects, salaries, and educational requirements for various professions.

National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER): NCCER sets standards for training and credentialing in the construction industry, including plumbing apprenticeships.

Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC): PHCC is an organization that represents professionals in the plumbing industry and provides resources on education, licensing requirements, and career development for plumbers.

These sources were consulted to ensure accuracy and reliability in providing information about becoming a plumber after high school in Massachusetts.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine Frangos,
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