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What are some tips to becoming a elementary school teacher?

Are there things to look out for as well?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Noelle’s Answer

Be patient! Both with yourself and your students!

Be prepared! I often encounter difficulties during downtime. It's during these moments that students, having nothing to do, begin to stir up mischief.

Be flexible! The art of teaching requires juggling multiple roles!
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Maxine’s Answer

Showing patience with younger children, and understanding that you'll sometimes need to interact with their parents, is part of the journey. The true reward of teaching elementary students is that you're positively shaping their lives.
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RAVI’s Answer

Just wondering, which resources have you explored so far?

1) If you haven't yet, you might want to check out the CA Department of Education's website. They have a fantastic section on becoming an educator:
https://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/be/

2) Also, did you know that if you have a Bachelor's degree, you're only a CBEST pass away from becoming a credentialed substitute teacher? Here's where you can find more about it:
https://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/leaflets/30-Day-Substitute-Teaching-Permit-(CL-505p)

Stepping into the role of a substitute teacher can be a great way to dip your toes into the world of teaching. It gives you a chance to experience different grades and school types up close and personal. Who knows, you might find yourself drawn to teaching a particular grade within the elementary levels, or maybe even the hustle and bustle of middle or high school!
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Pamela’s Answer

Hi Isabella
Pray first. I will be 🙏🏾 praying with on decision making (Romans 12:1-2) but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to rest and approve what God's will is his good, pleasing and perfect will.

1. Obtain a bachelor's degree in education or a related field from an accredited university.

2. Complete a student teaching internship in an elementary school classroom to gain practical experience.

3. Obtain a teaching license or certification in the state where you plan to teach.

4. Develop strong communication and interpersonal skills to effectively communicate with students, parents, and colleagues.

5. Stay current on best practices in elementary education by attending professional development workshops and continuing education courses.

6. Create a positive and engaging classroom environment that promotes learning and student success.

7. Develop strong organizational skills to manage lesson planning, grading, and classroom activities effectively.

8. Collaborate with other teachers and education professionals to share ideas and strategies for teaching.

9. Build relationships with students and parents to create a supportive learning environment.

10. Keep a positive attitude and maintain a passion for teaching to inspire and motivate your students.

Wishing you great success!!!
-Professional Pamela Knight
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Jerry’s Answer

First, take a good look at Ravi's and Pamela's answers. They are well thought out and can be extremely helpful.

Here's one question you should explore: Teaching in a public school or private?

Secondly, have you considered contacting a local elementary school and finning out if it's possible to talk to some of the teachers about their teaching experience. The good and the bad (and the ugly). Maybe one (or more) would agree to let you sit in on some classes.

Or perhaps you have the time to volunteer at an elementary school. See what happens.

And now for a negative. If and when you enter a school of education you will discover all sorts of theories related to "proper or effective teaching". Frankly, many of these "theories" are written by professors who have never spent a day in an elementary classroom. But they write academic papers and present them at assorted conferences and spend time consulting. But are these things really effective in the classroom?

I've written this before: On the first day of class, you walk in and tell the students that you are all in this together. It's not you versus them. Or them versus you. Everyone in the class will be working together. If they "buy it" You've got them. And they've got you.
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