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What majors are acceptable in becoming an hr?

I am in my second year of college, currently focused on psychology.

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Regina’s Answer

HR professionals come from a variety of majors. I have a degress in English Literature and History, and an advanced degree in Human Resources Development. I've seen a number of professionals come with Psychology and business backgrounds, as well. At the end of the day, pursue a degree that allows you transferable skills into Human Resources and look for internships that equip you with real world experiences in the field.
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Rachelle’s Answer

Hi Angelica! In the diverse field of Human Resources (HR), there isn't a universally 'approved' degree. HR encompasses various specialties such as compensation, benefits, talent acquisition, HR business partnering, learning and development, and more. However, many HR professionals come from backgrounds in psychology or other humanities degrees, so you're definitely heading in the right direction.

My own background is in economics, which wasn't initially intended to lead to a career in HR. Nevertheless, it has proven beneficial, particularly in the analytical aspects of HR like compensation. I've also encountered professionals from diverse fields like law, IT, and finance who have transitioned into HR at some stage of their careers. So, the key takeaway is that practical experience tends to be more valuable than a specific degree in the long-term journey of an HR career.

Rachelle recommends the following next steps:

Look into the many areas in HR, depending on your interest, if you are more into client facing and dealing with people, or more into numbers and analytical, etc.
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Trapper’s Answer

There are a variety of career options within HR, and there are countless college options which can lead to rewarding HR careers! I studied business and worked for nearly 5 years in finance before moving into the HR field. It has helped me view things through a different lens and the ability to do technical data analysis has been very helpful.

While your selected major is important, I would encourage you to pursue internships or other opportunities to make steps toward your HR career as well. Good luck!
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Kelly’s Answer

Great news for you - many colleges offer majors in HR and labor relations! If you're considering switching your major or planning to earn an associate's degree before diving into a new bachelor's program, take a good look at the curriculum of your potential new program. If it lines up with your HR career aspirations, don't hesitate to jump in! If your focus in psychology is organizational psychology, you're already on the right path. However, clinical psychology might steer you in a different direction. Some folks opt for a business major, but be aware that this could involve a focus on accounting, economics, or other areas that might not tickle your fancy.
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Layne’s Answer

This is a great question, and it is great that you are thinking about ways to apply your college degree to your career. Psychology is a very common undergrad major for people going into HR. Although a psychology major doesn't learn HR concepts specifically, it teaches you about human thinking and emotion, which invariably come into play in HR. That said, a variety of majors go into HR, and there is no real limit to what major you can have. In HR, many things are learned on the job and through a variety of training and certificate programs. The most important thing to remember is that you "continue to be a student" even after you've graduated and started your new career. Continue to apply the thinking, studying, and time management skills you learned in college to your new career and you will be successful.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Angelica
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Stacey’s Answer

Fantastic question! I've been in your shoes. Initially, I pursued psychology before transitioning into Human Resources. I'm incredibly grateful that I expanded my skills by adding a business degree to my credentials. The beauty of Human Resources is its versatility. If you're feeling uncertain about the specific HR role you want to concentrate on, I highly recommend engaging in internships. Additionally, consider joining a company with an HR training program. This will allow you to explore the various aspects of the role, enriching your understanding and experience.
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Jerome’s Answer

I have found that Business and Psychology are the most traveled paths to HR.

I am sure there are also some certificates, but you are taking Psychology classes, make sure you take a few on conflict resolution and related areas. Being able to highlight a general understanding of those areas will be beneficial.
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Ahmad’s Answer

Hi there! Psychology is an excellent major for a career in human resources (HR) as it provides insight into human behavior, crucial for managing workplace dynamics. Other beneficial majors include Business Administration, Sociology, and Communications, which equip you with skills in organizational behavior and effective communication. Additionally, specializing in Human Resource Management can directly prepare you for HR roles. Consider courses in industrial-organizational psychology and seek internships in HR to gain practical experience.
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Rafael’s Answer

Hi Angelica! You’re on a great track with your psychology major, as it’s totally relevant for a career in HR. In fact, employers often look for degrees in business, communication, or social sciences for HR roles. So, your current focus can definitely work. Plus, if you ever want to branch out, HR positions may also welcome degrees in fields like legal studies, administrative training, and behavioral sciences. Keep at it, and you’ll be well-prepared for the HR world!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Angelica
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Sai tharun’s Answer

->People & Organization Management: This major offers a comprehensive understanding of managing human capital within organizations, covering areas such as talent acquisition, employee development, performance management, and organizational culture.

->Business Dynamics & Human Capital: Focusing on the intersection of business operations and human resources, this major equips students with the skills to optimize workforce productivity, enhance employee engagement, and drive organizational success.

->Behavioral Economics & Workplace Dynamics: Exploring the behavioral aspects of decision-making in the workplace, this major delves into topics like motivation, teamwork, leadership, and conflict resolution, providing insights into shaping a positive work environment.

->Social Dynamics & Organizational Effectiveness: Centered on understanding the social dynamics within organizations, this major examines how interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, and organizational culture influence productivity, innovation, and employee satisfaction.
Applied Psychology & Workforce Management: Integrating principles of psychology with practical HR strategies, this major focuses on areas such as employee assessment, training and development, organizational change, and talent retention to optimize human capital outcomes.

->Labor Policy & Workplace Governance: Addressing the legal and regulatory aspects of workforce management, this major covers labor laws, employment regulations, diversity and inclusion policies, and ethical considerations in HR practices.

->Strategic Communication & Human Capital Leadership: Emphasizing effective communication and leadership in managing human resources, this major equips students with the skills to engage and inspire employees, foster collaboration, and drive organizational alignment.

->Public Administration & Talent Development: Tailored for HR professionals in the public sector, this major focuses on the unique challenges and opportunities in managing government or nonprofit workforce, including policy implementation, talent recruitment, and performance evaluation.
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Leticia’s Answer

Hello! In simple terms, the field of Human Resources is so diverse and layered that you can begin your journey from any point with your foundational degree, and then build upon it. For instance, I have a business degree (MBA), which is quite versatile and can be further enhanced with specific certifications. Consider what area of HR you're interested in, such as learning and development, recruitment, compliance, or a generalist role. This will guide you in deciding whether to major or minor in HR during your studies. I hope this advice is helpful for you! :-)
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