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How long does a person have to stay in college in order to become a lawyer?

I have wanted to become a lawyer because i feel as though I can better help my community. By becoming a lawyer, I can defend people who need help. I have always felt the need to make a change, and help the people who have been pained in life. I feel as though without lawyers, the "bad guys" will get off the hook for doing something that is very inappropriate and evil. I plan to be a prosecutor in criminal law. #law #school #in #amount

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Subject: Career question for you

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Jung Hwa’s Answer

Lawyers are definitely empowered to help people less fortunate, and I am so happy to see your early commitment to public service.


To become a lawyer, you have to have a college degree (usually, 4 years) as well as a law school degree (3 years.) That may sound a lot of school/tuition, but especially if you want to be a public interest lawyer, there are usually loan forgiveness programs that take care of your tuition if you dedicate yourself to public interest work for a certain number of years after school. Check the websites of law schools that might interest you -- almost all law schools have a financial aid website that describes the type of loan forgiveness or financial programs that the school offers. Feel free to call up the people who work in those financial aid offices and ask them what types of aid they offer; that's what they're there for! Good luck!

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Alison’s Answer

With your commitment to defending people in need, I am certain that you will make a wonderful lawyer.


If you are interested in becoming a criminal prosecutor, you should seek out volunteer and internship opportunities in this field. For instance, during law school you can intern with a U.S. Attorney's (federal prosecutor) or District Attorney's office. During college, you could also seek out volunteer opportunities at the federal or state prosecutor's office.

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Mohan’s Answer

To be very honest, the length of your stay in college depends on number of years you take to complete under grad and then get entry to law school (usually by qualifying through LSAT exam). Some institutions like USC provides 3+3 program where you can get direct entry to their law school (Gould School of Law) if you complete undergrad in 3 years with GPA of 3.81 or above (and other criteria). So in a way you can complete law school in 6 years here. Stay in college gets you a law degree. To become a lawyer, and a successful one, you have to start with your a firm with reasonable practice to get rich experience. It may take a few more years to be a lawyer after you get that coveted law degree

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Mackenzie’s Answer

To become a lawyer in the United States, you typically need to complete a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from an accredited law school. Here's an overview of the steps required:

Bachelor's Degree: Before applying to law school, you must first complete a bachelor's degree. The field of your undergraduate degree doesn't necessarily have to be law-related, but it's common for aspiring lawyers to major in subjects like political science, history, English, or pre-law. Maintaining a strong GPA and developing strong research, writing, and critical thinking skills is important.

Law School: After completing your bachelor's degree, you'll need to attend a law school accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA). Law school typically takes three years of full-time study. During law school, you'll study various areas of law, legal research, writing, and participate in practical experiences such as moot court or legal clinics.

LSAT Exam: To gain admission to most law schools, you'll need to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Your LSAT score, along with your undergraduate GPA, will be a crucial factor in the admission process.

Application Process: Apply to law schools of your choice during the application cycle. Each law school has its own admission criteria, which may include letters of recommendation, personal statements, and interviews.

J.D. Degree: Upon successful completion of law school, you will earn a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree. This is the basic law degree required to practice law in most jurisdictions.

Bar Exam: After obtaining your J.D. degree, you'll need to pass the bar exam in the state or jurisdiction where you intend to practice law. The bar exam assesses your knowledge of legal principles and your ability to apply them to real-world scenarios.

Character and Fitness Review: Before being admitted to the bar, you'll likely need to undergo a character and fitness review, which assesses your moral character, honesty, and fitness to practice law.

Bar Admission: Once you pass the bar exam and meet all other requirements, you'll be eligible for admission to the bar in your chosen jurisdiction. This is the final step that allows you to officially practice law as a licensed attorney.

Keep in mind that the process may vary slightly depending on the state or jurisdiction in which you intend to practice law. Additionally, some states offer alternative paths to becoming a lawyer, such as completing a part-time or evening law program, or even studying law in an apprenticeship or reading program. It's important to research the specific requirements of the jurisdiction you're interested in practicing law in.
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