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What are some things to learn quick about going into college ?

What are some things to learn quick about going into college

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Doc’s Answer

College is just around the corner Mike. The transition can be overwhelming as you enter a new environment. below I've complied the top 5 things listyo should learn before going to college to help things run a little smoother.

• NETWORKING – In college, networking isn’t just a buzzword, it’s a crucial skill that can open doors to countless opportunities. I wish I had realized the importance of building relationships with professors, classmates, and professionals in my field early on. Attending events, joining clubs, and actively engaging with others can lead to internships, job offers, and valuable connections that may shape your career path in unimaginable ways. Don’t underestimate the power of networking; it’s more than just swapping business cards – it’s about forming genuine connections with people who share your passions and interests.

• RESOURCES – Colleges and universities offer an incredible network of support to students. This includes librarians, study skills centers, teaching assistants, and other students. Consider these individuals part of your path of learning, and you will reap great benefits from their advice, knowledge, and experiences. If you’re struggling with an assignment, reach out to another student or the teaching assistant in the class to troubleshoot. If you’re studying for an exam and don’t know how to approach the huge amount of material, sign up for a session at the study skills center. Or, perhaps you’re writing a paper and need help finding rich source material; check in with the librarian who may have excellent ideas for how to locate good materials. You can also find a private tutor to help you.

• 80/20 vs 20/80 – Your high school teacher provided around 80% of the information you needed to know to be successful in her class. You came up with the other 20%, usually by completing highly directed tasks such as well-defined homework assignments, worksheets and the like. College operates opposite from how you’ve been conditioned to learn. The 80/20 paradigm flips to the 20/80 paradigm. Your professor provides a foundational 20% of the information needed for the class. You’re responsible for producing the remaining 80%. You must develop your knowledge away from the classroom.

• ACTIVITIES – As a first year student, maybe you are thinking what will do you do after classes or how you will have meaningful activities other than schools. College is not just about hitting the books; it is an opportunity to explore new interests, make lifelong friends, and develop essential life skills outside the university. Extracurricular activities offer a platform to do just that. In your freshman year, a lot of clubs or organizations will invite freshmen to join them during freshers week. Whether it is a club related to your major, participating in sports, or volunteering for a cause you are passionate about, these activities can enhance your college experience in countless ways. They provide a sense of belonging, help you build a well-rounded resume, and teach you time management and leadership skills. Remember that it is not just about academics; getting involved in extracurricular activities can be the key to making the most of your freshman year or whole school year.
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Alvarez’s Answer

Discover how to be more productive and manage your time effectively. Pay particular attention to the moments right after class and your leisure time. Unlike high school, college provides a lot of unscheduled free time. This means you won't have a timetable of classes and activities marked by a bell or buzzer. You'll need to manage your time yourself.

Here are my top tips:

1) Use your phone, laptop, or tablet to record lectures while you're taking notes. Concentrate on what the professor is saying in person. Take some notes, but keep your focus on the live discussion. Later that day or immediately after class, review your notes and listen to the recorded lecture. This will allow you to fill in any gaps in your notes and reinforce your understanding of the material.

2) Try to listen to the recorded class immediately after it ends or within a few hours. This will help you remember the information more easily because it's still fresh in your mind.

3) Apply the same approach to reading and writing assignments. This will help you understand and remember the material better. If there's something you don't understand, you'll be able to ask a clear, specific question to get the help you need.

4) Review all the information you've received as soon as possible. This includes your notes, recorded lectures, and reading assignments. This will free up time for you to learn important social skills and network with others. HUMANITY

5) Complete your schoolwork efficiently and effectively. This will allow you to enjoy your college experience and make new friends. Now that you're in college, you'll need to be disciplined and responsible for your own choices. This is a valuable life skill.

Embrace the unique experience of college. Be grateful for this opportunity. Enjoy every moment!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Mike!

Starting college can be an exciting yet overwhelming experience for many students. Here are some key things to learn quickly about going into college:

1. Time Management: College life comes with a lot of freedom and responsibilities. It is crucial to manage your time effectively to balance academics, extracurricular activities, social life, and personal well-being. Creating a schedule, prioritizing tasks, and avoiding procrastination are essential skills to succeed in college.

2. Study Skills: Developing effective study habits early on can make a significant difference in your academic performance. Learn how you learn best - whether it’s through reading, listening, visual aids, or hands-on activities. Experiment with different study techniques and find what works for you.

3. Financial Literacy: Understanding the costs associated with college education, such as tuition fees, textbooks, accommodation, and other expenses, is important. Learn how to budget your finances, explore scholarship opportunities, and consider part-time job options if needed.

4. Networking: Building relationships with professors, classmates, alumni, and professionals in your field of interest can open up various opportunities during and after college. Attend networking events, join clubs or organizations related to your interests, and maintain professional communication skills.

5. Mental Health Awareness: College life can be stressful at times, so it’s essential to prioritize your mental health. Familiarize yourself with the resources available on campus such as counseling services, support groups, and wellness programs. Practice self-care routines and seek help when needed.

6. Career Exploration: Start thinking about your career goals early on by exploring different majors, internships, volunteer opportunities, and career paths. Visit career services centers on campus for guidance on resume building, interview preparation, job search strategies, and networking tips.

7. Independence: College is a time for personal growth and independence. Embrace the opportunity to make decisions for yourself, take responsibility for your actions, and learn from both successes and failures. Develop critical thinking skills and become a lifelong learner.

By focusing on these key areas early on in your college journey, you can set yourself up for success both academically and personally.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

The Princeton Review: The Princeton Review is a leading test preparation company offering resources on college admissions advice, test prep courses, tutoring services, and student resources related to academic success in college.

U.S. News & World Report - Education: U.S. News & World Report provides rankings of colleges and universities based on various factors such as academic excellence, graduation rates, student satisfaction surveys, financial aid availability among others.

American Psychological Association (APA): The APA offers valuable insights into mental health awareness in educational settings including tips for managing stress in college students and promoting overall well-being during the transition into higher education.



God Bless You 1,000%!
JC.
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Kim’s Answer

When heading into college, it's crucial to grasp essential life skills beyond academics. Time management, organization, and effective communication are key for success. Additionally, understanding how to navigate setbacks, whether academic or personal, is vital. Learning to adapt, seek support when needed, and maintain a healthy balance between academics and personal life are invaluable lessons to master early on in college. Alongside these skills, prioritizing fun and maintaining balance is equally important. Finding activities that bring joy and fulfillment while managing time effectively ensures a well-rounded college experience. Balancing social life with academic responsibilities requires careful prioritization, laying the groundwork for a fulfilling journey through higher education.
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