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What class in college has benefitted you the most in life?

Disregarding your job, what class that you took in college has been the most helpful in your day to day life? And, applying your job to this question, how has a certain class benefitted your specific job?

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John’s Answer

Hi Olivia! Great question!
I'm going to be controversial here and say that probably nothing that I did at university has been helpful in my day-to-day life. That doesn't mean that it wasn't interesting and I did enjoy doing the work. It's just that it's mostly irrelevant to my life. For some context here, I studied Chemistry in both the UK and in Sweden and then came out knowing the one thing I DIDN'T want to do any more was Chemistry :-)
I ended up in IT so in that sense maybe the only class as part of my first degree would have been one on FORTRAN programming. That said, I've only very rarely ever used that since taking the class either.
I think the bottom line is that the vast majority of what you study is unlikely to be relevant once you leave university unless you are going to work in the same field that you are studying. Also remember that something like science and technology changes at such a pace that apart from some base knowledge, the details will always be changing. i.e. you're always going to be learning. The key things I think you will get out of university won't be things that are necessarily taught, but will instead be things like "how to learn things", "how to communicate well", "how to collaborate and work in teams".
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, John! Olivia
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Preché’s Answer

I love this question! The most helpful class I took in college was my debate communications class. I am not the best public speaker and in this class I had to debate another person in front of the class. This class taught me to speak up, be confident in what I believe in, and how to get my point across to others. Now, I still get nervous when it comes to public speaking, but this class "forced" me to explore ways to help me overcome it. For example, my voice shakes or trembles sometimes so to help myself with this I make sure to talk slower and not ramble. I also get sweaty sometimes, ugh, so I make sure to carry a water bottle with ice water to cool me down.

I decided to go to college as a business major with a specialization in Accounting and Finance. My college courses were really just the foundation. It's kind of like kindergarten, they teach you your ABC's and numbers, so that you can move on to the more complicated stuff. I feel like my college degree was that for me. It taught me the basics, but I really started learning when I got my first job in my career path. The foundation definitely helped me understand certain things but putting things into practice, I learned that on the job.
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Kristine’s Answer

Hi Olivia,

I think any of the classes that required me to present or speak in front of the class were the most helpful. That being said, they were also my least favorite classes as I absolute hated public speaking. Being forced to present many times and learning ways to be better at it helped me to be more confident in my speaking over time, which has definitely translated to my job when I am leading calls or presenting information to my teams.

Since I am an auditor, I was required to take the CPA exam. As such, towards the latter half of college, a lot of the classes were more specific to auditing/accounting, and I found them very helpful in helping me study for the exam since the information directly related to what I would be tested on. I don't necessarily think that these classes helped me in the day-to-day workings of my job as much as I learned a lot of what I do on the job, but it at least helped with completing that exam which was a big steppingstone in my career.

On a completely separate note, I think that it is great to take some more "out there" and interesting classes that don't necessarily relate to your job field or professional skills. I took a class that I would like to call a "hippie class" as it focused on thinking about nature and yourself and being closer to the world. We would write journals about looking at trees and clouds and it was definitely very out there! But I thought it was kind of fun and a nice change up from the rest of my classes and it has brought me to appreciate nature and our surroundings much more as a result in my day to day life!
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Annalise’s Answer

I have a couple answers to this question! My first answer is not a specific class but my business degree. This degree forced me to be in classes that required a lot of group projects and complete a lot of presentations. These classes taught me how to work with people as a team and learn how to overcome challenges as a group (whether that be the project at hand or dealing with people who have different ideas). Furthermore, I got really comfortable presenting in front of other people. Public speaking is a crucial skill and practicing it in college is a great way to get comfortable!

I think a basic economics class was also super beneficial to take. It gave me a foundational understanding of the economy and terms that you hear every day and in the news!
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Jason’s Answer

Hey Olivia,

There are 2 that immediately come to mind. The first is macroeconomics. One of the primary takeaways was the concept of opportunity costs. Which is the losses associated with making a decision to do one thing over another. It really made me evaluate the decisions I make and why I make them. It made me slow down a bit to find the best option for not only the now but the future. it's a concept I apply in my day to day life.

Second was Management Information Systems (MIS). It was the first exposure I had to a course that was solely focused on technology. It was my first exposure to IT as a career field and the first time I could truly say I wanted to read a text book cover to cover. It made me realize I had a passion for technology and was what led me to pursue a career in technology.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Jason! Olivia
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Brent’s Answer

Oliva, the answer is it depends on how I define helpful. If I limited myself to the skills required to do the tasks related to my work then perhaps the training I had in STEM is used more often. But I also need to present those ideas to other people so the classes I took in English Lit and the social science I also use is also important. So like I said it depends.
If I
There is no one course/program that is universally helpful for everyone. There are just to many variables. My theory is that college is a place to learn a method of thinking, learning and living your life. The courses you take and the teachers you meet will help you in this create your method.
A method of thinking and learning is transferrable to any situation. A course not so much.
As an example I have never used Trig in the real world but I use logic frequently
I hope you find this useful and good luck
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Olivia
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Stephanie’s Answer

I firmly believe that the Speech and Communication Skills courses, along with Journalism and Writing classes I took in college, significantly enhance my daily life. They not only boost my performance at work but also aid in effectively interacting with my children on a personal level.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Olivia
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Olivia,

In my personal experience, the class that has benefitted me the most in life outside of my job is Psychology. Psychology has provided me with valuable insights into human behavior, emotions, and relationships, which have been instrumental in navigating various aspects of my personal life. Understanding concepts such as cognitive biases, emotional intelligence, and communication styles has helped me build stronger relationships, resolve conflicts more effectively, and enhance my overall well-being.

Moreover, the knowledge gained from psychology classes has also proven to be beneficial in my job as a Marketing Specialist. Understanding consumer behavior, motivation, and decision-making processes has allowed me to create more targeted and impactful marketing campaigns. By applying psychological principles such as social proof, reciprocity, and scarcity in my marketing strategies, I have been able to better connect with customers and drive higher engagement and conversions.

Overall, the analytical skills developed through studying psychology have enabled me to approach both personal and professional challenges with a deeper understanding of human behavior and motivations.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

American Psychological Association (APA): The APA is a leading scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. Their research publications and resources provide authoritative information on various psychological topics.

Harvard Business Review: Known for its high-quality articles on business management practices, the Harvard Business Review often features insights on how psychology can be applied in the workplace to improve leadership, decision-making, and employee engagement.

Stanford University’s Department of Psychology: Stanford University’s Department of Psychology is renowned for its research contributions to the field of psychology. Their studies and publications offer valuable insights into human behavior that can be applied in real-world settings.

These sources were consulted to ensure accuracy and reliability in discussing the benefits of psychology classes in both personal life and professional endeavors.

God Bless You, Muchly, JC.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Different colleges have strength in different subjects. Firstly, you need to find out what careers you have interest. The relevant subjects is the major and minor you can consider.
Below are my suggestions:
1. Think about what you have interest, eg your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc and identify the related careers
Eg if you like music, would you like to be a musician, singer, musical artist, music composer, music producer, etc
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counselor, your parents, etc
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue. The relevant subjects are the major and minor you can consider.
5. Find the college review on these subjects and explore the entry criteria.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
May Almighty God bless you!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Olivia
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Rabia’s Answer

Hello there! I've found that classes involving public speaking in front of a large audience have greatly boosted my career. I highly recommend you consider enrolling in a course that will expand your communication abilities and help build your confidence when addressing a big crowd. It's truly a game-changer!
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Elizabeth (Betsy)’s Answer

Hello Olivia,

You've posed a truly thought-provoking question that I'm sure has many people pausing for a moment of reflection. If I were to pick one, it would be the introductory course to computer programming. This class was unique because it came with lab time. This meant that as a student, you had the freedom to spend as much time as you required in the lab.

Apart from completing my computer course assignments, I also took advantage of this lab time to tidy up and arrange my work for other classes. It also served as a great opportunity to plan ahead for future projects. Balancing between work and school was quite a juggling act, but this lab time was incredibly helpful.

As I transitioned into my professional life, started a family, and got involved in volunteer work, there have been times when I've been incredibly busy. Even though I no longer have dedicated lab time, I still carve out moments to plan and organize my work. This helps me stay on top of my responsibilities and commitments.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Olivia
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