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How is it possible to pursue a major in nursing but also biology at the same time#Spring23?

Hello! I want to go to school and major in biology to pursue further education at medical school but I also want to have a back-up and at least a job that will give me some experience in the healthcare field, but I don't know if it's possible to pursue nursing and biology at the same time even though they should have pretty similar classes I believe.

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Martin’s Answer

You can absolutely conquer both biology and nursing, just remember to be mindful of your schedule. Your nursing education program, including courses and clinical, will be clearly laid out for you, offering a certain level of predictability. Meanwhile, the rest of your electives and time are yours to command. The challenging part of your decision lies in choosing your field, as medicine and nursing are built on two unique models and academically, they are not interchangeable. The foundational courses you complete in your initial years may be recognized as prerequisites for nursing school, but there might be additional compulsory classes. When you step into the actual nursing segment of the program, those courses might not delve as deeply into the subject matter as those taken premed. You might also want to think about pursuing a double major with a degree in nursing and another in the sciences to meet the medical school requirement. It's going to be a demanding journey but totally manageable, particularly if you opt for night classes and summer courses.
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Karissa’s Answer

You would need to take a 5th year to major in both Biology and Nursing. You mention going to medical school and having a guaranteed job in the healthcare field. Trust me in telling you that America has a shortage of doctors and if you graduate medical school you will definitely get a job. You just need to decide if you want to be a doctor or a nurse.
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Christine’s Answer

When you study for nursing you do take biology and anatomy and physiology 1 and 2. I have a BS in Animal Science which really helped me in the Diploma RN program I was in. So the only science I did not take was Physics. Though they made me take AP 1 and 2 over as it was in Animals. However they did not understand it was the same stuff I had already done. I got an A and A+ when I retook them. It can be challenging, and you electives can be the biology courses you are looking for.
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Maureen’s Answer

Hello Anuoluwapo,

Have you considered volunteering at a hospital? It could be a great way to understand the roles of doctors and nurses better, and help you decide which one would bring you more happiness!

It's true that many students are now hesitating to pursue a career in medicine due to the rising student loans and the fact that the salary doesn't always match up with the heavy workload.

But here's a thought - you can still keep your options open. A lot of university students select majors other than biology before heading to medical school. As long as you've covered the necessary pre-requisites and passed the MCAT exam, you're free to choose any degree you like.

Karissa makes a good point too. You might need an extra year to cover all the pre-requisites. It would be a good idea to have a chat with a school counselor. They can guide you on the best path forward, considering your grades and your natural talents.

Best of luck with everything!
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Carolyn’s Answer

Hello,

If you are not set on nursing, pursuing an undergraduate degree in medical laboratory science could be a good option as well. You would build a strong foundation in biology and chemistry, and take courses that would help prep you for medical school (immunology, hematology, transfusion medicine, etc.). Most (if not all) of the medical school prerequisites are part of the normal curriculum for this major.

If you decide to take a year off between under grad and med school, or not go to medical school at all, you can work as a medical laboratory scientist or pursue one of the many opportunities available to you with this degree. This could include working in a hospital laboratory, government laboratories, the public health field, research, infection control, education, forensics, biotech, etc.

I wish you luck as you plan for your future!
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