9 answers

How do I devote my career to serving others while making sure I'm financially stable and independent?

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My college education has been rich in genuine service, social action, and giving back to my campus and my community. I have loved every second of this experience because I thrive on interacting with new people and I want to change the world. I truly believe people can make an impact and I want my career to be devoted to making the world a brighter place. With that being said, I also want to be financially comfortable and able to support myself and a family one day. What are some of the best opportunities or career fields to enter for someone dedicated to making the world a better place while also financially supporting themselves? #service #leadership

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9 answers

David J’s Answer

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Simple. Follow a specific code of ethics for your life. #serviceaboveself. If you are a individual dedicated to service you must place service to others at the top of your priorities.

The great news is that others can see this and your reputation as a Servant Leader is established.

Within that opportunity will follow.

#oneprofitsmostwhoservesbest

It may not be a monetary return by you will profit.

I recommend visiting a Rotary Club meeting.

Google Rotary in your city and I am sure you will gain some insight just by visiting.


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Kenneth’s Answer

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When I was an engineer for Boeing in Seattle, the company would give me time off work to participate in science fairs at local primary schools where I judged student projects and presentations on scientific topics. Reading their journals, observing their presentations, talking with the students about how, why and want they learned by conducting their scientific projects. And, to promote their enthusiasm for learning science. I was very fortunate to have this opportunity to interact with young students and observe their ingenuity and enthusiasm. It was also inspirational for me too, giving me both ideas and the desire to learn more about scientific topics not directly related to my job. One thing I learned from being a teacher of student pilots is that one can learn as much from the student as the student can learn from the teacher. Simply observing how someone else tackles a challenging situation offers new perspectives for understanding , or even new ways to approach or think about a problem that needs solving. Young people who have not yet become complacent, are extremely open minded in their approach to new and challenging things in their life. We adults need exposure to that attitude in order to retain or renew such an approach to problem solving.
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Boris’s Answer

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This is such a fine line to walk, but please know that you are not the only one struggling with this. If you're just out of college, or a soon-to-be graduate, your attention naturally shifts towards sending out job applications and figuring out living arrangements if you haven't already done so. Like many students, you were probably afforded the opportunity to make an impact on your community through organizations, fraternity/sorority school chapters, and the like. However, after graduation, it might become a bit challenging to continue being apart of the same community activities that fed your devotion to serving others since much of your attention has to shift towards finding financial independence. When choosing a career path, not all paths are going to enable you to serve others in the same capacity, but don't let that deter you from those opportunities. Your goal should be to serve a PURPOSE. If a company has a vacancy that requires you to run a report, don't think for one second it doesn't serve a purpose. Yours and everyone else's roles at that company will play a key part in its success. Once you've mastered your own role,don't be shy to reach out to others and see what they do, maybe there's a process someone does that needs to be shortened or data they collect that can have more value than it already does. There is a great satisfaction in knowing that you're able to do your job while also helping others.


If you really have a deep yearning to help the community, you can always research local volunteer opportunities that you can do on the weekends or start living environmentally conscious.


Hope all this was helpful!



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Donna’s Answer

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I spent 16 years as a 911 dispatcher where I felt the fulfillment of giving back to the community I worked in on a daily basis. Due to circumstances beyond my control, I switched careers to Business Management and now manage a team of up to 17 people in a call center environment. While I do not get the same feeling of fulfillment I had in my law enforcement career I have the opportunity to impact lives. Starting with the people on my team and their families. Providing a happy, healthy work environment has that impact. Working for a company that has strong ties to the community and believes in "corporate citizenship" enables me to enrich my life and my community. Along with a peer, I developed and co-chair a committee in our call center that organizes fundraising events to give back to the charities or organizations chosen by our employees. Find your passion and follow it, opportunities will arise.

Donna recommends the following next steps:

  • Research the companies you choose to work for. Find those with a strong community feel.
  • Stay connected to the organizations you are passionate about right now, continue to volunteer.
  • Find a way to link the two, get creative.
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Audrey’s Answer

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Great question and a positive outlook to serving others. As you begin your career you may not be able to serve others in a way you are used to, through the various organizations you were affiliated with in school. You will be serving others through your career with the work you do. Look beyond what you do and on to who receives the benefit of what you do. Also, many companies have a variety of employee groups which offer opportunities to serve others in your local community. Focus on companies who offer these opportunities. Good luck!

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Brittany’s Answer

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When I hear things like this, it's often from employees that are not satisfied in their role. Remember that sometimes you will have jobs that don't seem like they help mankind and you have to find those. For example, I manage in a call center for DIRECTV/AT&T tech support and often have to remind my staff why some people rely on us being able to provide them television services, that it's not always "just TV."
Another point to consider is to look beyond your role. My main role is a customer service manager, my secondary role is a special project I took on voluntarily. I co-lead a charity committee that runs fundraising events to help impact our local community.
It's a hard balance but the answers are not always obvious!
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David’s Answer

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The model that I think serves this dual purpose the best is to contribute a set % of profits to social causes you are passionate about and believe in their mission.


The other strategy you could adopt is to develop a product or service that helps a key segment you are interested in. The only risk with this strategy is your business can come under scrutiny for achieving to much profit.


I personally prefer strategy one because the more financially successful you are the more positive contribution you can make.

David recommends the following next steps:

  • List out potential products or services you could provide to help people/society.
  • Utilize social media for feedback on ideas/concepts
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Mike’s Answer

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I think you can find a career that can contribute to serving others while allowing you to be financially stable and independent. A lot of organizations have Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives that defines how the organization can impact the community. Others have employee resource groups that creates programs, events, initiatives and outreach that helps employees give back and learn more about certain causes and needs within their community. That how I became more involved and fulfilled my desire to do more for the community. If your organizations don’t have these outlets, it would be a great opportunity for you to work with the leadership and start one up! Hope this helps!

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Brittany’s Answer

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When I hear things like this, it's often from employees that are not satisfied in their role. Remember that sometimes you will have jobs that don't seem like they help mankind and you have to find those. For example, I manage in a call center for DIRECTV/AT&T tech support and often have to remind my staff why some people rely on us being able to provide them television services, that it's not always "just TV." Another point to consider is to look beyond your role. My main role is a customer service manager, my secondary role is a special project I took on voluntarily. I co-lead a charity committee that runs fundraising events to help impact our local community. It's a hard balance but the answers are not always obvious!

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