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Should I continue doing what I was doing or is it time to make a change?

I have been working in Sales for approx. 2 years now and have another job lined up in the same field. However it pays less than my previous job which I quit due to bad judgement. Now that I have completed my MA in Professional and Business communication, my question is: -
Whether I should continue in the line of sales or start from scratch for working for a PR agency lets say?
While answering please do keep in mind that I feel that I was once burned out working as a Sales Rep. and decided to quit my job. #career #career-choice #career-path #masters #sales #career-change

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Subject: Career question for you

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Steve’s Answer

Best of the Village

We've all made decisions based on bad judgment that are only apparent when looking back. Don't beat yourself up about it.


You have an advanced degree. You have some experience. I think the trick for you now will be to find something that you enjoy. In reflecting on your educational and professional engagements, what activities did you most enjoy and which were difficult. Some people like research projects where they worked alone while others prefer team projects. Some prefer writing, some prefer speaking. People naturally do better work on things they enjoy. And when there's too much to accomplish, the finish the fun ones first. What activities in your past brought you the most satisfaction--joy in the work plus excellent results.


When looking for a job, there are two aspects to consider. You are looking for a job you'll enjoy that leverages your skills, one where you can do competent work and get paid. The other aspect is your potential employer is trying to solve a problem. How can you help solve this problem? Think of yourself as a product. How will you communicate your skills in a way that shows the employer that you're the solution to the problem?


You're trained in communication so this should be easy for you. Write down the types of things that you can do and how they would solve a problem for an employer. When looking at job openings, don't just send a resume--send a cover letter that responds to each of the problems listed in the job posting.


If you were a product, your resume would be your comprehensive feature list. "I can do x, y, and z." But when dealing with a hiring manager, you want to say, "You're dealing with this challenge. Since I have done 'x' I have proven my ability to solve problems like this."


Or to put it another way, if you were to build a website for yourself as a product, what would you say?


Here's how I do it on my webpage: It’s time to get your team on the same page. They need a common language, a company-specific set of tools and templates, and standard methods for developing and delivering products. I can help you develop a product playbook, a collection of workshops, tools, and templates, all customized to your organization.


I suggest that you chat with friends and colleagues about the opportunities available in your area and which seems likely to fit your personality and skills.

Thank you comment icon Wow Steve, I think that is one of the best advices I have ever received. Thank you for your guidance, I will try to work on this. Rishabh
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Ben’s Answer

Rishabh,
You have received some great advice above. It is impossible to trick yourself into loving sales. In the end, if money is your only motivation, you will eventually lose interest in the job. That being said, you may want to consider a "sales" job that does not require you to do the things you don't like about sales (that burned you out). Some sales jobs work only with inbound customers that are already in a buying mode. Your job is to help them with their order and potentially "expand" the sale. The money is not as good as a hunter role, but could be rewarding depending on your interests. With your communications background, this might be a good compromise?

Thank you comment icon Thank you Ben. Rishabh
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Gary’s Answer

Hi,
You have a great answer above, I thought I would share as well. I was burned out in sales years ago and left my job as well. I do not regret the decision at all, it was one of the best things I have done for myself. I have often thought about going back to sales but to be honest, when I think seriously about it, i just like the money/$$$ and honestly, sales can be an easy job at times. I think you should ask yourself why you want to go back to sales(?). I am in sales support now...and I absolutely LOVE IT...I get to work with sales people, help them, etc...the pay is a little less but the job satisfaction is much higher.
Good luck with whatever you decide... :)

Thank you comment icon Thank you for your feedback Gary. Well it is a good question you ask and I think I would agree that I would like to go back because of the money. But when i talk with other experienced professionals all I hear about is "forget the money" do what you like, so that makes me think whether I should be taking a different road now. Rishabh
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Pam’s Answer

You have received some great advise above! I would recommend you reflect on what about the sales role caused burnout. What did you like about the role? What caused you stress? Then I would take some time to outline what is important to you in a new role. Not only responsibilities but think through industry, career advance opportunities and other factors. Many sales jobs give you an opportunity to interact with different departments and position you for growth. There are also many career options that support sales teams that may be of interest to you that would allow you to leverage your experience. If you like what you do, you will find success. Good luck.
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Toby’s Answer

You have to have a balance, and sales isn't for everyone. you have to identify what excites you, what wakes you up early, where your passion lies. if you can find an opportunity (no matter what the assumed pay might be) that lights your fire, you will find a way to make money doing it. Passion/interest drives success more than money can motivate. your financial situation/opportunities will ebb and flow...passion for what you do remains constant.

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Hussam’s Answer

you should always pursue what makes you happy and what would want you to get out of bed everyday because you want to not because you have to.

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Ben’s Answer

Hi


I would suggest to think about what you liked and disliked about sales to see if that is the direction you want to go. As stated above there are different types of sales roles and industries to look for that matches your strengths and personality. There are also many roles in in business that can be financially rewarding as well as match your strengths in communication and your education. Good luck and follow your heart!

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Jim’s Answer

Sales is not a job for everyone and from my experience it is not something you can train yourself to like over time. Reflect back on not only your job experience but also your schooling and decide what items most intrigued you and motivated you forwards. That should point you down a career path making you successful and providing an income that will make you comfortable.
Remember Sales positions are supported by many jobs and having someone in those roles that have done a sales job before really means something to the sales team.
Good Luck on your next step.
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Samer’s Answer

The secret to success is to find a job that has the following 3 components:
1. Choose something you love
2. Choose something you are good at
3. Choose something that earns a good living.


The sweat spot is to combine the three together.


Good Luck :)

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Imogen’s Answer

This is a really important question to ask yourself. Whilst many people will have opinions on why you should or shouldn't do sales, it really comes down to your own opinion.

I'd consider asking:
1. What parts of the job do I enjoy about sales
2. What parts of the job do I dislike about sales
3. What am I good at?
4. What do I need to work on?

Asking these questions may not give you a definitive answer but will allow you to understand what your ideal job/career looks like.
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Greg’s Answer

You've received some great advice above. Ultimately, the only person who can answer that question is you. I would definitely recommend consulting your friends and family as well as anyone you consider a mentor in your current or desired fields. Make an educated decision but weigh the pros and cons. I would caution sacrificing comfort for the unknown but also cannot recommend sacrificing happiness for reliability.

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