Skip to main content
6 answers
6
Asked 735 views

What is the best way to discover skills to put on resume?

I am currently revamping my resume and I want to add some skills for better search optimization. I was wondering how I can discover skills that will be great for my resume. So far, I have looked at the jobs that I have worked and educational experience and used that for inspiration but I'm wondering if there is a better way to do this?

#resume #job #skills

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

6 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Hanleigh’s Answer

Hi! You want to avoid skills such as a good listener, quick learner, etc. Those are considered "soft skills." These are skills that are expected out of a candidate, and they do not need to be reiterated. Your skills section could include any software skills, so if you have worked with any particular software programs, you should include that. If you have any training, you can include that. For example, people in the counseling field may include if they have had any trauma counseling training.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Tee,

Absolutely there is a better way! You need to shift your perspective. A resume is not an autobiography. Or, as I read once, but forgot who said it, "A resume is not a rearview mirror, showing where you have been. It is a windshield, showing where you are going." That is to say, you write the resume towards the job you are applying for.


Look at the job descriptions of jobs you have applied to, or plan to apply to. Pick out the "buzz words." Incorporate them into your resume. Look at the job descriptions again. Slowly. Rather than telling yourself you don't have experience doing "xyz," try to think back to things you have done that DID require that skill. Maybe you called it by another name. There are many "transferable" skills. It is up to you to show how your experience in another line of work relates to the position you are applying for.


For example, I went from being a police officer to being a career counselor. How? My strongest keyword was "interview." Definitely did not use "interrogate!" Second strongest was "customer service." As a police officer? Absolutely! I had to explain how law enforcement at an airport was very different from "the streets." Add a little bit about "Active listening skills," "maintaining confidentiality of information," and "report writing," and before you knew it, you'd think this was the most natural transition in the world!


I recommend the website onetonline.org for the most detailed job descriptions you could ever imagine.

I also recommend that you research the topic of "Applicant Tracking Software." The first "person" to review your resume will likely be a computer. It is looking not only for certain words, but also frequency they appear, strategic placement, and other such variables. I apologize, I am not very familiar with it, and don't have a particular link to give you. Once you get past the computer, a human will eventually look at it, so you want it to appeal to the human eye as well.


Also, when applying to jobs, "tweak" the resume to include any particular things the job description hit on that you may not have covered well enough. In all honesty, you can't do that each time you apply to a job. However, if this job is one that you really hear "calling you, " then put forth the extra effort. When I apply to a job I really want, it normally takes about three hours. And I have been doing this a long time!


Lastly, do not, ever, ever, ever, PAY somebody to write a resume for you. Writing a resume is an exercise that forces you to dig down into your own being, to identify your strengths, and learn to articulate them. It is an excellent preparation for an interview! There are no shortcuts!


Oh, and remember, this is all about how you can help the employer's business to be successful - it's not about "you." If you are applying to jobs with businesses, remember, the purpose of business is to make money. If you can show how you will help them to make, or save, money, you will be on the right track !


Let me know if I can be of further assistance!

Kim

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Howard’s Answer

A good place to start is to look at any volunteer work or actually duties you have preformed if you have had any paid work experience. Even if you have not held any kind of job, you most likely have helped out on projects at school , a club , or for a church/youth group. Take a little time to review what you actually assisted or did while working with any of the above mentioned groups.. If you can identify certain task or projects assisted with, you can use these as skills that you can incorporate into a resume for potential employers.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Zsolt’s Answer

While I really like Kim's response, I have a very different approach:

I'd recommend browsing LinkedIn in detail. Find the companies you're targeting and skim through people's profiles who work there (you can do this in incognito mode so they won't see your name). This way you can identify what kind of skills others demonstrate (if they get a lot of endorsements, that's even better) in your area of interest.

So you can take an inventory of these and assess whether you already have those skills (mention them as you already have them) or you're willing to improve yourself in those areas (mentioned them as your development path).

This could be a good tactic to be attractive to future employers and differentiate yourself.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

G. Mark’s Answer

I've looked through hundreds of resumes looking for people to hire, and I would say that browsing through any job listing site, like Linkedin, would be a great way to find out what skills are popular. I would also read through the job listings themselves. This will tell you not only what skills are popular, but what skills employers are looking for.

Next, I would look through business articles for coming trends. These would give you an idea what skills may not be currently readily available or being hired for, but what will be in great demand in the near future.

You also may want to focus on those skills that you actually enjoy using, so you can give some boost to your probability of landing a job you'll like and be happy doing well.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mary’s Answer

What do you want to do in the future Tee. Review online job descriptions/positions, acquire those skills and add to your resume. You are preparing for the future.
0