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What are the strains put on you as an aerospace engineer?

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I'm an 8th grade student going back and forth between a biomechanical engineer and an aerospace engineer, and I'm leaning more on the aerospace side. After looking through the different job requirements and such, the deciding factor for me will be what the strains are for each job.

#aerospace-engineering #aerospace #aeronautics #mechanical #engineer

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Robert’s Answer

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The strains vary on the exact position you are in. However, in general the keys to being a good aerospace engineer is to always recognize there is more to learn and to be humble enough to admit you don't know everything. From a knowledge base, aviation is expansive but having a good understanding of how planes fly (i.e. getting a private pilot license) has served me well even though I work in the regulation side of things and my professional background is from the deign and repair side of the industry. Also, be sure to go after the jobs and task that seem the most daunting. Others run away, thus running towards it provides the best opportunity to grow and learn as well as reinforce self confidence. If you mess up, then make sure you learn the most you can about how you messed up and improve yourself for the next opportunity.

Robert recommends the following next steps:

  • Seek out a co-op and/or internship opportunity
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John’s Answer

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I'm an Aero Eng by degree and moved to the medical device industry after several years. Both have their unique challenges, but the actual level of job stress was about equal. I worked in space applications for several years, so they both focus on extremely high reliability. You'd be surprised how easily you can move from one field to another when you get a good, solid engineering degree from a good school. Keep an eye on what the industries are doing in the next years while you prepare for school. You'll likely find a specific field of interest that will make the decision for you! Good luck!
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John’s Answer

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I'm an Aero Eng by degree and moved to the medical device industry after several years. Both have their unique challenges, but the actual level of job stress was about equal. I worked in space applications for several years, so they both focus on extremely high reliability. You'd be surprised how easily you can move from one field to another when you get a good, solid engineering degree from a good school. Keep an eye on what the industries are doing in the next years while you prepare for school. You'll likely find a specific field of interest that will make the decision for you! Good luck!
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