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Is it worth it becoming a biology major?

-Job opportunities
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-Enjoyment of field #biology #science #major #college-major #medicine

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Dewan’s Answer

To be honest, biology is one of those degrees that is only good as a gateway to professional schools like pharmacy, medical dental school etc. It is such a vague degree that it does not have much of a pathway to a specific concentration. If your goal is to go to a professional school or even work in a life-sciences field, then I would recommend that you major in an area that is more specific (if your university does provide these options): microbiology/immunology, genetics, anatomy/physiology, medical humanities, environmental science etc. More specific degrees provide students with a more streamlined pathway to graduation and it helps set apart your application in interviews and other settings. However, if your institution does not provide those degrees, then you can always speak with your academic advisor about having a concentration within your biology degree. Hope that helps!
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Rachel’s Answer

If your goal is to become a physician, a biology major may make sense for you. Many of the classes required for a biology major are also among the pre-med requirements (1 year biology, 1 year inorganic chemistry, 1 year organic chemistry + labs, physics, calculus, and biochemistry). That being said, you certainly don't need to major in bio just to pursue a career in healthcare. GPA is more important that your major.
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Ian’s Answer

That largely depends on what you consider "worth it"?

I happen to love my job and make decent money, but am by no means wealthy. I do however have a home, a car, a couple of dogs, and get to take international vacations with my wife.


Biology is hard. If you are looking for an easy job where you get to retire early, look somewhere else.



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Estelle’s Answer

Biology is a very common major for students considering going to medical school. If you complete a degree in biology, you will have also fulfilled some of the requirements for courses required to apply for medical school. This often saves time and money. However, I recommend visiting the career resources at your college to see other jobs for which you might qualify with a biology degree. You might find that most of the jobs will require a masters degree if you do not go into medical school. other jobs for people with biology degrees are pharmaceutical representatives, genetic counselors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teachers.
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Molly’s Answer

Short answer: yes, if you love biology and want to learn more about it.


If you're immersed in studying what you find to be interesting and inspiring, you'll be motivated to make a career out of it. In biology you also have the benefit of having tons of options for direction. In my undergraduate and graduate studies in biology, the system I worked in is very different from the one I work in now, but the skills I built in thinking like a scientist, designing and managing studies, communicating my work, managing and analyzing data, finding funding support, etc etc) transfer directly to what I do now, even though it's a very different industry.


As you explore biology more broadly, think not just about what specifically you'd want to study within biology, but what is your unique skill set? What sorts of aspects of science do you most enjoy and find you can contribute the most to? For me, it was communications--so now that's my focus as a scientist. For others, they love the analytical aspects of science and find themselves working as data scientists or in drug discovery modeling the effects of medicines on the body. Some people are really visual and work in fields of science where they use cool imaging techniques to study certain aspects of anatomy and physiology...the options are endless. go for it.



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