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What are questions I should ask in an interview if I am applying to be a flight attendant?


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Sonya’s Answer

I have 20 years in the airline industry. I will respond from an overall industry perspective. First of all consider what the industry is all about...travelling. Next consider what your daily tasks will be and rank them in importance. You are there to assist in passenger safety and having a pleasant flying experience. Prior to the interview research the company, gather as much information on the routes they fly, typical passengers e.g. mainly family groups going on vacation? Or business travelers? Then ask relevant questions to that airline based on your research...e.g. Do we offer any type of in-flight activities that would keep small children entertained? How do flight attendants assist nervous flyers? Is there ongoing trainings to assist flight attendants stay informed with safety and other regulations? Outside of that showcase that you've researched the company by mentioning something you found unique about the company then maybe asking a relevant question.

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Catherine’s Answer

Hi Kiana, I would highly suggest asking questions like "What are your expectations for a successful attendant?" or "What are the most frequent challenges attendants have?"

By framing questions that allow the interviewer to open up their point of view, it will give you a better picture of the work environment, hints about the workplace culture, and a chance to build rapport with the interviewer. My most successful interviews have been ones where I was able to spin questions onto the interviewer to 1) show them that I can think and listen analytically and 2) to learn more about my potential new employer.

Make sure that the company is a good fit for you too. It's as much an interview of the company and its workers to see if you want to work there. Good luck!

Catherine recommends the following next steps:

List the characteristics of a company that are important to you.
Saved!
Make a list prioritizing those characteristics.
Saved!
Go into your interview with a mental list of things that are red flags to you.
Saved!

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Brian’s Answer

It's always important to understand what people love about the role and what they find challenging. Remember, although you may want the job and you believe that it's their choice about whether to hire you, it's your life. You may decide that the job isn't a good fit with what you want. Ask questions that will help you make a decision. You are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Be thoughtful. Better to understand the realities before you take the job. Be curious! My wife was a flight attendant at Delta. Again, no job is perfect. Do research about the role, but make sure you are asking important questions about the quality of the experience.

While the money is great, you will either love or hate the job based on your daily experience with the company. You may be in a situation where you need the money, but the lure of the money will pass after a few paychecks.

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Karen’s Answer

Great you are thinking ahead about your interview and asking questions shows you have a high interest in this organization.

In any interview it can be helpful to ask about what other employees say are the greatest joys and biggest challenges of this job. You could ask the interviewer about their own career path and why they stay where they are. If you're wanting to move up in the organization, questions about where they might see you in three years would communicate your long-term interest.

At the end of your interview you could ask about the best way to follow-up to continue to express your interest in the position.

Happy flying!!

With every good wish.

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Updated Translate

Karen’s Answer

Great you are thinking ahead about your interview and asking questions shows you have a high interest in this organization.

In any interview it can be helpful to ask about what other employees say are the greatest joys and biggest challenges of this job. You could ask the interviewer about their own career path and why they stay where they are. If you're wanting to move up in the organization, questions about where they might see you in three years would communicate your long-term interest.

At the end of your interview you could ask about the best way to follow-up to continue to express your interest in the position.

Happy flying!!

With every good wish.

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