5 answers

What resources should I be reaching out to/finding for people to notice my art?

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How do you get people to recognize your art? Do you share it? Post it? Go to a museum? How is it possible for people to recognize your works and get a basic following to possibly live off of? #art #artist #college #fine-art #career

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5 answers

Kirti’s Answer

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Hi Maddie, I am going to keep my response as short and crisp as possible:

First things first, art is very subjective and personal to individuals. What i mean is, the definition of art for me may not be the same for you.

On people recognizing your art, you can try and consistently keep at the below options that i read on artchain: (https://www.artchain.world/all/ten-tips-get-art-artist-noticed-2/).

1) Get active on social media
2) Build your own website
3) Join a global online art platform
4) Enter art or artist competitions
5) Tap into the local art market
6. Make your artwork shareable on social networks
7. Write your own blog
8. Create a newsletter

In some months after doing these diligently, i am confident that people will start recognizing your work. But to improve recognition, you must keep posting your new work regularly or follow a time table, because as they say 'Out of sight is out of mind'. Once you have established this, i think you can then begin by checking which of your art is the most popular. Then slowly bounce off the idea of selling your artwork to your followers and gauge the response. If you feel the time is ripe, go for it. However, do make sure that you do not quit the job that you have at hand until such time that you see yourself occupied in your artwork (based on demand) for at-least a year.

Lastly, i strongly believe in having a plan chalked out on when you want to do what. Basically, have line items that call out, you dedicating time to art, months where you will bounce the concept of selling, when it is that you will be analyzing which of your art has the most response etc. This helps keep a record of everything in one place.

Hope this helps.

Kirti :)
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Alan’s Answer

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I am an informal consultant to a local artist. The struggle he has is whether to be an artist or a business man. He has chosen to be an artist and as a result he operates his art as a hobby.

My advice to you is to decide to develop art as a business. In order to do that I suggest you speak with successful artists in your area. Find out what art sells and how to price your art so it will sell. I suggest you take courses in business and accounting. Develop a marketing plan as part of a larger business plan.

It is my belief that artists have an obligation to share their art and to make a good living in a career that makes all our lives meaningful.
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Caitlin’s Answer

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When I was in high school, I was very interested in art. My art teacher would take us on field trips to local art studios to meet artists. We even started an art show at our school for our fellow classmates to admire our work. Can you start an art show at your school? Can you reach out to local artists or art studios and speak with them?

Other great options are to reach out to community centers, libraries, or even local restaurants. I know my local library always has art around, and some of my favorite restaurants too. They change their art seasonably for the holidays. Be sure to bring good pictures of your art pieces for them to see and ask them if they would be wiling to display a piece or two. Perhaps you could even make some business cards to put with your art display so people can look up more of your work or reach out to you. A quick google search for "Exeter New Hampshire Art Show" came up with a few interesting art shows. Check these out!

Lastly, if you enjoy social media, maybe you can create an account or website dedicated to your art work. Connect with other artists, follow hashtags, and ask for feedback and tips from other artists that look successful. You can do this! Keep making art and be sure that you enjoy it first before sharing with others.
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Bettye’s Answer

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I would recommend several options for getting your art work noticed. Social media is an excellent marketing strategy where you can post a few pieces with prices that include shipping. Have you considered connecting with a local art gallery in exchange for devices such as cleaning brushes, designing cards and brochures to promote them and then eventually, after you’ve established relationship with them, they might be willing to give or rent space to showcase your works in a showing. Also if there’s a local art society I’d strongly consider joining it as an actively involved member. Also check with your local library and schools/colleges for guest speaking opportunities to share info on various mediums and how to use them for which kind of painting. I hope this helps! Wishing you the best.
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Ellen’s Answer

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Hi Maddie

Getting yourself noticed as an artist is an art form in itself. There are quite a few ways to get your artwork noticed, but, besides really wonderful and original artwork, it does take effort, time, patience, and some luck. There are few "overnight sensations" in the art world, and it takes time in getting your work on the walls for people to see and admire. With online resources, there are even more options out there. Here are a few strategies. I'm in a similar position, as a retired art teacher I'm now selling my artwork, and here is what I have to share.

As a Student: I'm hoping you are showing your artwork in your school, as an art student it is good to get your work on the walls. Talk to your art teacher about opportunities. This helps in just getting your artwork ready for display, getting used to people looking at your work, and working on a portfolio of your work to show to other people.

Local Galleries and Art Associations: If there is a local community art gallery or artist association or artist club in your area, see if you can join and show your work in their exhibitions. I belong to such a gallery, and I have my work in their monthly shows, it is very satisfying, and I have made some sales. You might have to pay a membership fee, and there is often a fee (usually $5-$10 per item or less) when you have your work juried, plus a percentage (10-20% usually) if your art sells. Remember, most of these are "not for profit" galleries and need funds to do these exhibitions I have found these costs to be worth it. Nobody is getting rich from taking these fees.

Local Restaurants and Businesses: Many local smaller restaurants (not chains) often have artwork for sale on their walls. Check out your local restaurants or small businesses to see if any do this, and ask if you could show your work there. Again, you'll probably have to give them a percentage of sales.

Commercial Art Galleries: These are where art is a business, and they represent artists that they feel will sell. You could check them out, but beware, they often want more experienced artists, who already have a track record of selling their art. They will also take a percentage of your sales, usually 50-60%. This is the traditional way to get "noticed", but not the only way now a days.

Online Resources: Welcome to the 21st century! You could set up a website of your artwork. This takes work, but it would be nice to have, and nice to be able to reference when you show people your artwork. You could also sell from your website. Also, if you haven't already, set up an Instagram page (more visual than Facebook). or Facebook account and join some of the art user groups. A great way to connect with other artists and learn how they are presenting their work. You probably know more than I do about the use of hashtags, so use them to your advantage. I use Instagram, and I've been happy with it. You don't sell from Instagram, but you can refer them to your website or email, where you could arrange a sale.

Online Selling: Lots of artists seem to be doing well on Etsy, the online art/craft seller. It is easy to set up an account, but it does require a little money upfront before you sell. I've done Esty with jewelry, and it works OK, and there is a lot of online support for its members. There is however, lots of competition, and standing out on Etsy is a challenge. Also, there are online art galleries, such as Saatchi Art, which I am less familiar with, but worth looking into. Then there are companies were you can upload your artwork, and customers can choose to have your images put on different items, such as cards, t-shirts, coffee mugs and so on. You get some money when someone picks your art. Mint and Cafe Press are such companies. All of the above seem interesting, but, with the exception of Etsy, I have not put my art on them, so I am NOT endorsing them, just giving some information you might check out.

There are websites that act as clearing houses for art competitions throughout the US, such as "Juried Art Services".

With all of the above, there are probably others, and some Googles search may give you more ideas.

Finally, I would beware of anyone, such as an art agent, who promises to jump start your career but charges you some sort of fee. Check them out and get references from other artists before you give them any money or artwork. Also, never sign away the rights to your images to anyone without checking it out. With the exception of the "Not for Profit" galleries and associations, I would be hesitant about paying anyone a fee upfront.

I hope this will give you some places to start. Remember, the best way to help yourself get noticed is to have a really good portfolio of creative artwork that showcases your skills and your OWN original ideas. If someone says, "Oh that looks just like.....", you need to up your creativity. Again, I would talk to your art teachers for some help and guidance. Be patient and humble with everyone you meet. Best wishes.




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