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How do i get my first job?

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i have little job experience, basically just work i've done around my house. i want to get a job but i'm not sure where to start. #job #job-search

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John’s Answer

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Depending on how old you are Murphy, there are only certain jobs you can do and hours you can work. Check the Child Labor Law regulations to see how they apply to you. In order to work legally in some states, workers under eighteen may need to obtain working papers, which are officially called "Employment/Age Certificates." If your state requires them, you'll need to show them to an employer when you're hired.

5 JOB SEARCHING TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

High school is a busy time for most students. You’re likely to be juggling your commitments to school, home, and extracurriculars already. Would it be crazy to add another responsibility to the mix? Holding down a job in addition to the rest of your responsibilities might be a risk, but it isn’t without benefits, both financial and otherwise. From the most practical standpoint, having a job means having an income. In addition, a job can provide you with some real world experience that you otherwise wouldn’t get at such a young age. You will gain perspective on managing multiple commitments, be held responsible in a professional capacity, and even learn more about your future aspirations.

1) CHECK WITH YOUR HIGH SCHOOL GUIDANCE COUNSELOR
Your High School Guidance Office staff should be able to help you with job listings and job-search advice. There may be a bulletin board with job postings, a notebook with listings, and/or an online job board. They might also have internship opportunities, which may (or may not) be paid, but will give you valuable experience.

2) WRITE YOUR RESUME – Even though it may not be required by employers, a resume can help you stand out from the competition. Even though you may not have much information to include, a resume shows that you're serious about your job search.

3) JOB SEARCH ONLINE – Check websites that list local job openings. You can use the job search engines like Indeed.com to search by keyword part-time and your location to find job listings in your city or town. Check your local Chamber of Commerce website (Google your city/town name and Chamber of Commerce to find it) to see if they list jobs. There are lots of sources of employment opportunities, both for part-time during the school year and for great summer jobs.

4) NETWORK – Many jobs come through referrals from people you know, so it's important to let everyone know you're looking for a job. This is where your parents and their friends, teachers, coaches and other adults can be a great resource. Be sure to mention the kind of work you'd like to do, but don't turn down an opportunity just because it's not the perfect job. It might lead to the job you really want.

5) BE FLEXIBLE – Sometimes a job might not be exactly what you're looking for, but it puts you in contact with people or organizations that might help you in the future. Also, don't be too quick to turn down a volunteer position as your first job. Sometimes the best compensation is experience - and future employers love to see volunteer experience on your resume.

Don't give up if you can't find a job right away Murphy. A job search takes persistence and patience. It's important to keep trying, because a potential employer will notice if you have the determination and the drive to find a job.

John recommends the following next steps:

  • Indeed – https://www.indeed.com/
  • LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/
  • Google – https://careers.google.com/jobs/
  • Joblist – https://www.joblist.com/
  • Glassdoor – https://www.glassdoor.com/Job/
Thank You Sergio. “Our generation has the ability and the responsibility to make our ever-more connected world a more hopeful, stable and peaceful place.” — Natalie Portman John Frick Translate
Thank Aun. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck John Frick Translate
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Rebekah’s Answer

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Start by applying to SYEP which helps to employ people as young as 14. Go to your local organizations (Super markets, library ) and see if they are hiring. Due to COVID-19 I would also be on the look out for jobs that are hiring online. If you are under the age of 16 I recommend including a guardian in this online hunt for jobs just to make sure you're being safe. Once you head to college you'll have the opportunity to work on campus as long as you say yes to work study on your FAFSA application.
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Sergio’s Answer

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Murphy,
I applaud your aggressiveness, and great job reaching out to get multiple opinions.

Your best bet is to walk into local businesses and ask for an application as well as their typical interview dates. My first job was at McDonalds. Not very glamorous, but it was such a great “first job.” Reason, they are used to employing teenagers with no experience, so as long as you are respectful and honest in your interview, you stand a good chance of getting an opportunity.

Assuming you do well and get the job, take 90 days to learn how this works for you, always remember that school is your primary objective. Your future is brightest if you do well in school. After 90 days, you will now be experienced, wiser and more aware of your working goals (hours/ pay/ working weekends). If you decide that you want to continue working, I’d start applying to phase 2 jobs. Do not leave McDonald’s (or entry level job) abruptly, they gave you your first opportunity, treat them respectfully.

In just 4 months, you will be employed with a decent wage, have two line items in your future resume, and be 4 months closer to completion of high school (again, this is always target #1).

This worked for me and I’ve been happily employed since I was 16. I hope this helps. Good luck in school!

Sergio recommends the following next steps:

  • Find an entry level employer close to home
  • Dress well and be respectful at your interview
  • Give first employer 90 days (at least) , this will help you define your limits and desires
  • Always Always Always put school first!!
That's a great idea, and something I'm planning to do as well. Unfortunately due to COVID, I might not be able to get one this summer, but I hope to start right away during fall. Thank you for the advice, Sergio! Aun M. Translate
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Riley’s Answer

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This depends on how old you are. I'm not sure about the grocery stores where you are but some of the ones that we have here in Florida hire as young as 14, with no job experience required! I actually grew up in Texas as well and when I was 16 I got my first job at Tom Thumb as a bag boy. I think grocery stores are a great route to choose because they are often willing to hire young people and will be willing to work around your school schedule. To get hired, just walk into your local store, ask someone if they are hiring, and usually they will either give you an application to fill out or direct you to someone who can. Even though you don't have much on it, it always looks good to bring a printed resume with you.
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Austin’s Answer

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Hi Murphy,

Having no experience shouldn't be a problem at all. When you are looking for your first job, I believe there are two things you should think about. Work that you are passionate about or that teach you essential skills that can help in the future. When trying to figure out where to apply or how to get started, there are a few ways:

-Go online and search for "entry-level jobs in your area."
-Look for businesses or restaurants anywhere near you live and that have any "hiring" signs outside their window. Go inside and ask for the manager, and if you can apply.

While these tips are how you get started, you should figure out which job you would like to do to help with narrowing down which jobs to pursue. If you were to choose to work at a retail store, you could learn a lot of logistics and the operations of tracking items for inventory. If you were to choose to work at a restaurant (which I did just about a year ago when I was a few years out of college), it's a great place to get a lot of customer service experience that translates to most jobs in almost any field. Lastly, don't forget to ask family or friends of the family if they need help with any of their businesses, as that is a great way to get a job is through personal connections as well.
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Felix’s Answer

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Hi Murphy,

Since there are various of jobs in the world, I recommend you to find out what you really get passion in, to find work that you love.

When you prepare to find a work, you should finish your CV for applying any job.

Below are some questions you may want to think about:
1. What your personality is? (Outgoing/talkative/patient etc.)
- If you are outgoing person, maybe you would like to have a customer service related job. Eg. Sales, front office.
Otherwise, maybe you would like to think about office job.

2. If you want to find a job based on your major or interest?

3. If you would like to attend a job fair?

After all, you may get ready to update your CV and LinkedIn profile. Good luck and stay safe!
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Poojitha’s Answer

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I think the first step would be to create a LinkedIn account and explore entry level jobs that require no experience. Another great way to get a job is through networking! I recommend volunteering in organizations that interest you - that's definitely a good starting point.
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Tyler’s Answer

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Hi Murphy!

I'd like to echo all the above comments. Your aggressiveness and eagerness to find a position will be key in your success. When I landed my first job, at a restaurant, I went around to all of the local shopping centers and asked if they were hiring. Even if many are not at the moment, most will still have you fill out an application and may reach out at a later date. The more applications you have filled out, the better chance you will have at finding a job in the near future.

While the current situation has made the job search process even more challenging, some industries and companies are hiring now more than ever and I suggest investigating: shipping and delivery services, grocery stores, pharmacies, and remote IT support to name a few. There are a lot of active lists online that highlight these companies and industries.

Lastly, I would suggest trying to develop some skills that would make you the best candidate for your desired position in the future if you are unable to find a job now. Volunteering, free online courses (including Ivy League schools), free software trials, and continuing to post and ask questions on sites such as these, will all assist you in landing a job in the near future. Many companies are extending their products/services at a discounted rate or for free during this time and you can take advantage of that. Best of luck!
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Lesley’s Answer

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Hi Murphy! You already have some great advice here so I'd like to add just a couple thoughts - starting with to take it one step at a time, keep trying, and don't put too much pressure on yourself! If you are motivated, and pursue multiple options - you will find something.

I definitely agree with the suggestion to start by networking with people you know. I got my first job at a store through a neighbor. Ask people to share suggestions and ideas, and to think of you if they hear of any opportunities in the future.

Reflect on what you think you are good at, and what you would offer to an employer. Are you hard working? Will you show up on time? Are you motivated to help others? Are you a strong communicator? Are you very organized? If you are not sure - ask others for some feedback. What do they think would make you a good worker or employee? Even if you don't have actual work experience, you definitely have skills and aptitudes to offer an employer, and it's important to be ready to share those strengths once you get a chance to ask for work or submit an application.

You mentioned working around the house. Do they reflect skills or abilities you can offer an employer? Could you do the same tasks - for example, lawn work or painting - for others for pay? Perhaps there are people in your community who need assistance and are willing to pay. If so, and they hire you - remember it is important to follow through and do a great job, not just because you made a commitment, but you might also get more work. Word of mouth recommendations are a great way to find additional work. In fact, no matter what job you pursue - remember the importance of follow through. Being reliable and hard working are key for successful employment.

Good luck!
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Mike’s Answer

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Look for something you like doing to start with. You're not going to enjoy going to work if you don't like what you're doing. You want to make your education your first priority so try and find something with flexible hours that fits your schedule. Don't be afraid to fail. It may take a few tries for you to learn how to understand what it takes to be successful in the workplace.
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Victoria’s Answer

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Every job you do helps you move on and get another job. Have a look at what is available to you online and ask around. Use each job as an opportunity to learn new skills and develop existing ones. All experience is invaluable, regardless of the sector.
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kristal’s Answer

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Just go ahead and find the interested one for your first job.
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Sunny’s Answer

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find your passion and find interest company and Send CV again and again . finally you will find your first job. don't be afraid and keep going, you are the one and only one.
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Gina’s Answer

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Keep an eye out around town-- a lot of stores will post signs. Also, you should check out some search engines that might have postings.
indeed.com
linkedin.com
glassdoor.com

These should all help! Good luck!
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Blake’s Answer

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Hey Murphy,

You're not alone. Everyone has to have their first official job, so don't stress! I would recommend first deciding how much you want to work (i.e. if you have school Monday-Friday, etc.) because that makes a difference. If you're having a hard time finding jobs on career pages or websites, then I would recommend volunteering. That can help you make connections and potentially a first job.

Thanks,
Blake
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