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What is the most difficult part about being a full time student in college?


Time management: People will tell you over and over, plan your time wisely, take this seriously. Get yourself on a good schedule, keeping up a good balance between your school and social life is one of the best, and hardest habits to form. Get yourself a planner so you can see all your assignments keep ahead of the deadline. Most students don't like to hear this, but start your assignments several days before the due date. Do not wait till the last minute, start once you get it! If it was a small assignment, try to finish it the day it's assigned. For big projects, I would start up to 3 weeks ahead of the due date, then work little by little until it's finished. This puts you ahead of your peers, and help you avoid stress associated with deadlines. Regan S.

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Jon’s Answer

The most difficult part about being a full time student in college... is pretty simple... it's holding yourself accountable. You will no longer have a parent or grand-parent or guardian making sure you are attending class, turning in assignments on time, listening attentively in class, studying enough for tests, doing extra work when and where you need it, building good study group networks (should you need it), etc. etc.

It's all on you now!

And this is a great thing. This is a major step towards growing into an independent adult. You took the most difficult step already... you proved you were ready for college and signed up for it. You already have some great habits or traits then, right? Now, is the more difficult part... hold yourself accountable and figure out... what traits and habits do you have that aren't great?

Do you procrastinate? Do you like to be on your phone and halfway pay attention to lectures? Do you sometimes slack on the little things (i.e. who really likes citing their work after researching)? Do you really really put in the effort on your non-major classes? Are you partying a little too much here and there? You know yourself the best... your already know what your faults are.

So what are you willing to do to improve upon those traits?

Holding yourself accountable now will only set you up for success upon your graduation and entry in the working world. There you will have bosses, peers, clients, etc. that will definitely hold you accountable and your weaknesses will be extremely evident if you haven't started working towards them. And of course, addressing these things will help you in your every day life too (i.e. appreciating a spouse requires time and planning, paying your taxes isn't fun or easy to understand, mowing the grass isn't exciting but needs to be done). You can do this!



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Dr. Aisha Wright’s Answer

I agree with all of the answers provided here and I think the first response encapsulated all the the other responses on a broader scale: Self-Accountability :)

1. Ask yourself what do you do well and not so well as a high school student- For example, do you plan your time well to study for test and write papers? If not, then like others have mentioned planning might we where you need more support and figuring that our now rather that later will be better for you. Remember, practice takes perfect and find a simple tool (like a calendar) to start with. If you can't plan well on your own make time to meet with a graduate assistance that might work for your professor or student services for more help. Everyone need help every now and then. If you don't have any challenges planning out your time then let's think about something else...

2. Ask yourself if you would have a hard time choosing between going to a party/social gathering with friends or studying for that exam or writing that paper? This is where you have to make a decision that not only best for you socially or academically....and comes down to decision making. Maybe you know you have enough time to finish studying and you can go to the movies tonight because you have a week more to study and you've planned to make time to study? Weighing what's more important at a given time can be difficult and you'll determine what's best for you in the moment and for the future.

3. Some people have challenges that are more introverted and want to be sociable (or not because they prefer their own company). Some level of socializing is healthy, but learn what works best for you. You can only be you and you are still learning to be yourself (just like we all are). So just listen to what feels right, know that when you feel comfortable it could mean you're growing OR to another extreme that you need to pull back or stop what you are doing (especially if you're in danger for example). Main thing is listen to your self.

I hope these examples were some food for thought in thinking about what may or not be hard for someone being in school full time. Everyone is unique and while there can be similarities with others, there also might be interested. Maybe take the opportunity to ask others what was hard for them and then reflect on what you might be worried about for yourself and excited for. Talking to someone about what excites or worries you (and having them listen to you first then discuss) can be helpful in thinking things through.

Good Luck!

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Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Jessica! Great question. I agree with the previous answers, definitely managing your time ,especially if you work. I think it's not too bad but you need to know details about your schedule and plan ahead. I worked during college and always kept a planner with me, it did become stressful but once I was aware of when my classes were, what days I had work, and what assignments/exams I had to prepare for the rest became easier. I think if you manage your time successfully in college it really helps you in the long run. Make sure to keep up with work and assignments and attend class and also it is a little bit of being responsible; if you know you have work to do then you need make sure you complete it and maybe avoid distractions like going out with friends. Once you feel more relaxed you can definitely do the things you love but at times people would choose one over the other and when you let work slip away and maybe not attend class as often, it can hurt your GPA and your credits at the end of the semesters. Keep up the hard work!

Best of luck!

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Whitney’s Answer

I agree with Regan that the most difficult part about being a full time student in college is often time-management. One of the best tips I've received regarding time management is not to overlook small periods of time that you have available in your schedule between other activities. For example, even if you only have 15-30 minutes in-between classes, if you use that time productively you can free up an additional hour or two later in your day for fun activities! At the end of the day, time management in college comes down to staying organized and disciplined. Sometimes you have to make the hard decision to do the more important (and likely less fun) activities, but it will make all the difference when it comes to being successful.

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Lauren’s Answer

Time management and self-discipline can be most challenging for full time students. Most students want to embrace the atmosphere and social aspects but to be successful, you will need to stay focused, study daily and prepare for tests in advance. Finding classes and careers that you are passionate about will make self discipline and time management easier to implement.

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Mariah’s Answer

Hi! To me, the hardest part was the transition from high school to college. College is a completely different environment. For me, high school was a big social place, but college was the complete opposite, especially because I commute and don't live on campus.

In general, a tough issue that people have trouble overcoming is learning how to manage their time. For those that live on campus, they tend to wild out more because sometimes this is their first time without a guardian, so they enjoy themselves. Balancing school and a social life is an easy thing to do, if you manage your time correctly. I suggest getting a planner and writing due dates for your classes and plan your week out every week (Monday, I'll do assignment A and B. Tuesday, I'll do assignment C. etc).

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Kevin’s Answer

The hardest part is the transition from high school to the college atmosphere. You have less structure and you have to make yourself do your work as you go. If you are good at time management and understand that it is okay to tell friends 'no' because you need to do schoolwork then you will be fine!

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Blake’s Answer

The hardest part is time management. There will be a lot of things that you "want" to do and then there are a lot of things that you "should" be doing (i.e. studying).

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Garrick’s Answer

What is the most difficult part about being a full time student in college is being able to balance your time. Time management is a key part of life and especially in college. With so many social events you can lose track of your time. Having a calendar with all your assignments will go a long way and helping someone be prepared.

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Jeffrey’s Answer

All the answers provided by others are very relevant. Depending on your situation, there can be different challenges.

Just as others have mentioned, time management was a big challenge and a calendar was crucial. Additionally, finances and paying for college were a challenge. During my college career, I worked a part time job every school year and a full time job each Summer. During my Senior school year I worked 3 part time jobs which helped with the finances, but also increased the time management challenge. Part of the key was to find part time jobs which allowed for some study time on the job.

Every single one of my friends in college worked part time during the school year and full time during the Summer, so my situation was not an isolated incident.

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Jennifer’s Answer

The most difficult part about being a full time student in college is the balancing act. You want to make sure you get the most out of your education but at the same time you don't want to miss out on the social aspect of the college experience. The knowledge you achieve is crucial but so are the contacts you make. Those same people that you meet in college can be valuable resources once you start your career.

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