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If you want to become a registered nurse can you go straight to nursing school after graduating high school?

I have always had an interest in nursing because of the program I'm in at my local high school and having to be able to work in a hospital has always been a goal for me career wise and having to be the first person in my family that is in the medical field is a really amazing accomplishment. #career-path #medical-school #nurse


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John’s Answer

Arabella the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects faster-than-average growth rates for registered nurses and advanced practice nurses: 15% and 31%, respectively. Graduates of accredited nursing programs enjoy a robust job market with plenty of opportunities for professional growth. A nursing degree provides healthcare professionals with diverse job opportunities and high potential salaries. The first step is to decide what kind of nurse you want to be. This is important for determining what kind of education and other requirements you should pursue. Once you know what kind of nursing career you want, you can begin earning the appropriate education for the position. Make sure your school is accredited before you begin your program.

CNA CERTIFICATE • 4-12 week Certificate
Candidates for a CNA certificate need a high school diploma or GED. The program prepares students to perform direct patient care and provides training in areas like first aid, infection control, and general safety. The average salary for someone with a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) in the United States is between $35,500 as of July 27, 2020.

LPN / LVN CERTIFICATE • 1 year Certificate
A one-year program, an LPN/LVN certificate serves students who wish to enter the nursing profession without committing to a bachelor's program. Graduates learn how to provide patient care tasks, such as measuring vital signs, administering medications, and tracking medical histories. The average LPN/LVN salary in the United States is $51,000 as of July 27, 2020.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING (ADN) • 2-YEAR DEGREE
A two-year associate degree in nursing prepares graduates to take the NCLEX-RN to become a registered nurse. ADN programs serve students who plan to earn a bachelor's or master's degree later in their career but wish to start working in the nursing field right away. ADN programs usually require students to complete college-level introductory coursework in microbiology, chemistry, psychology, and medical terminology. ADN credits often transfer to four-year BSN programs. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average annual salary for ADN-RNs is $77,000.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN) • 4-YEAR DEGREE
A four-year program that positions graduates for supervisory nursing posts and provides a foundation for graduate study. Successful completion of a four-year undergraduate degree program in nursing prepares graduates to sit for the NCLEX-RN examination and become licensed registered nurses (RNs). A bachelor's degree will prepare students to become registered nurses through study of chemistry, nutrition, pharmacology, and nursing management. Current hiring trends in nursing favor RNs with a BSN degree. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average annual salary for BSN-RNs is $86,500.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (MSN) • ADDITIONAL 2-YEARS AFTER A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
The biggest difference between a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in nursing is the skill level achieved. Nurses holding a graduate degree have received more intensive and specialized training and have a deeper foundation of knowledge than nurses with an undergraduate degree. This generally leads to greater job responsibilities and higher salaries. The biggest difference between an undergraduate degree and a graduate degree in nursing is the skill level achieved. Nurses holding a graduate degree have received more intensive and specialized training and have a deeper foundation of knowledge than nurses with an undergraduate degree. This generally leads to greater job responsibilities and higher salaries. The average salary in the U.S. is $98,500 and $186,000 as of July 27, 2020. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Hope this was Helpful Arabella

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Bradley’s Answer

Yes you can, but I would recommend doing research on the college you would like to attend. There are a lot of schools that offer Associate or Bachler degrees. I personally would recommend a school that offers a Bachler degree. Once you have a school that suites you you will have to complete pre elective classes such as English, Math, Microbiology, Anatomy classes etc... then you would have to be accepted into the nursing program. Do the best you can in these classes because the higher your GPA would give you a better chance of getting accepted into the nursing program. First advice I would give is get a job as a CNA as soon as you have enough nursing credits. I personally think every RN should do this, it will make you appreciate the CNA's that help in the future and make you a better nurse. Second thing, make sure you want to be a nurse. This is one of the hardest course, job and rewarding job you will ever have. It takes a very special person to be a nurse and when you start you need to decide what kind of nurse you want to be a good nurse or a bad nurse. I hope this helps you a little.

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Raquel’s Answer

A lot of people have said that yes you can go to nursing school straight out of high school but that is incorrect. You can 100% start working towards nursing school straight out of high school, but even becoming an LPN (lower than a registered nurse) requires you to take prerequisite classes. If you want to become a registered nurse, like others have said you can either go to a community college or a university and get a bachelors. Many hospitals are now requiring bachelors degrees so that is the safer option and will save time and money in the long run. For these programs you will have to complete general education courses as well as more specific nursing related prerequisites like anatomy & physiology and microbiology. Each program has different prerequisite requirements so be sure to research the program you are interested in to determine what classes you will need to take. Before applying to a program you will also have to take an entrance exam, either the ATI TEAs or HESI. Both test your knowledge of math, grammar, critical reading, and anatomy & physiology. You will need to score well on this test and have good grades in order to be accepted to a nursing program, it is very competitive.

After you complete your prerequisites and take the entrance exam THEN you will be able to apply and begin nursing school. For a bachelors degree it is usually 2 years of prerequisites and then a 2 year program.

Best of luck!

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Estelle’s Answer

Yes! Start nursing program straight out of high school.
RN you can do either:
2 year Associates Degree in Nursing (ADN)
or
4 years for your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
Either Degree you will have to take the NCLEX-RN exam (you take this exam after you graduate)
So what's the difference?
Some people get their ADN 1st then enter the work force earlier.
Also some companies offer tuition assistance to help pay for your BSN if you want to continue your education.
BSN opens more doors for you. The BSN often times can advance into management jobs, leadership positions, specialties and research.
Good luck!


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Leia’s Answer

My suggestion, it will take a little longer but the payoff will be greater, go to college and get your BSN. Not a ASN to BSN. MOST hospitals require a BSN to get hired. It will serve as a good foundation as you grow in life and with your crew.

Good luck!

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