Skip to main content
6 answers
7
Updated 385 views

What are some occupations for an International Business major Economics minor? Is this a degree a waste?

I chose International Business and Economics because I am interested in business and politics and wanted degree that could be useful in both, but the more I look for jobs in business, the less value I see in my choice. I am still a freshman so I have time to change it.

#business #collegestudent #major #minor #economics #internationalbusiness #GivingisCaring

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

6 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mary’s Answer

Great question! Here is a recent article talking about opportunities for the international business majors that might be helpful.

https://www.noodle.com/articles/what-can-you-do-with-an-international-business-degree

The world is already super connected and interconnected in so many ways, and that is not going to change. Doing business globally, or "cross-border", requires more in-depth knowledge and skills to understand the often times complicated legal, regulatory, financial, tax, people, culture and logistical issues of doing business internationally.

For those wishing to pursue careers with either American companies with international divisions (which there are many!), or international (multinational) companies, a degree in International Business and Economics is a great place to start! And if your aspirations extend into politics or law, even better.

Think about what area of business and international business most interests you currently, and try to get involved with some clubs or other extracurricular activities on campus that may help you explore and develop your own international perspective. If you speak another language, that's great. If not, you may consider learning another foreign language. Also, when searching for a summer internship, look for opportunities with companies already doing business cross-border.

I see you are from San Antonio, TX. Here is the link to the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce - https://www.sachamber.org/
For a list of all local Chamber of Commerce organizations: https://www.sanantonio.gov/Business/ChambersOfCommerce
San Antonio Women's Chamber of Commerce: https://sawomenschamber.org/

I recommend checking out your local Chamber of Commerce website, blogs, programs, conferences, and networking events. This is a great way to get educated and get involved in both business and politics in your local community. This could lead you to scholarship and internship opportunities as well.

Good luck!

Mary recommends the following next steps:

Check out your local Business Chamber of Commerce organizations.
Look for summer internships with companies already doing business internationally.
2
2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Theresa’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

What a great question - and kudos to you for thinking about this early! I am a firm believer that you should choose topics that interest you in college, and try to find a way to "expand the base of your pyramid" , or put another way, choose learning opportunities that give you a diverse array of experience. From a career perspective, International business is very useful and economics is something that is worth knowing for your whole life. I would then prioritize experiences, internships, clubs, and leadership opportunities that help round out your experience.

As an HR professional, I would add that as individuals are entering the work force, what I am looking for is someone who demonstrates they can work hard to accomplish things, that they have a baseline level of intelligence, and that they are a leader or demonstrate competencies that could make them a strong leader.

Here are a few other things I would suggest - but otherwise, best of luck!

Theresa recommends the following next steps:

Read "Designing Your Life" - a GREAT book to help find your best career journey!
Read "So Good They Can't Ignore You" - a GREAT book about work ethic and being savvy in the work place
Email someone who does your dream job to ask for “an informational interview”
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shira’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

If you enjoy what you study, you will find a path forward in pursuing a job that you enjoy as well. Often times, your degree does not match up to the specific jobs, but building experience, and growing your network will be critical in any career path.

A few suggestions:
- Learning a second language - If you know, or are learning a second language, that could be useful for the major you are pursuing. As business and politics grow globally, having good communication skills will be useful regardless of the specific major you are pursuing.

- Gain experience in politics - Volunteering at your local representative's office can help you gain experience in politics and grow your network. This may give you a sense of what you may want to do with your degree, and give you access to people in the business world.

All the best.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Taylor’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

Lots of great advice on this thread already! What I would add is to try to think of your degree in a broader sense - will the degree you are pursuing teach you the skills necessary to succeed in today's job market? Are you being challenged? Are you interested in your field of study or are you pursuing a certain field because an outside force is telling you it is what you "should" study? Hopefully this will help you think about what you value in your education and how it can serve you in multiple industries - that way you are not limited to one field and have skills that can adapt to many different circumstances/job opportunities.

For example, my undergrad degree was in Business Economics, and what I found most valuable was the way it taught me to think about different situations and approach them from an analytical point of view. Even though I'm not an economist today, I still use the skills I learned in college in my current career.

Best of luck!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brian’s Answer

Hi Laniya,

No, your degree is not a waste. If you are interested in the classes that fall under your major I don't see that as a waste at all.

Yes, some jobs want degrees in particular majors but a majority of jobs don't care what your undergraduate degree is in. I would also search for clubs, internships, events that are in the fields of business and politics you are interested in and join the ones that fit what you like.

I would also start reaching out to people in the careers you are interested and ask if you can interview them over the phone, zoom or in-person to just ask them what they enjoy about their job and also what they do not enjoy about their job. Remember, no job is perfect and there will be aspects of any job that you may not like.

Best wishes in your college experience.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Matthew’s Answer

I studied international business in undergrad. I have had a number of different types of jobs and fields in investment banking, retirement planning, internal audit and global compliance (which has finally allowed me to do international business).

I wouldn't say your major/degree is a waste at all and that it gives you options on what you can do in the future. College is meant to give you some base skills to get you into the world and develop your own, do not limit yourself based on what a piece of paper says - discover what you're good at and then run towards it.

Many people complete college and have no idea what they want to do with their lives, some go their entire careers never really figuring it out. What's important is to learn what skills you have to offer and your ability to learn different industries/fields and then seeing where it takes you.

Unless you know exactly what you want to do, don't focus on the end goal of what job you want. The experiences you get along your journey will be more valuable to you once you reach the end.
0