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Is it difficult being a Mental Therapist

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Susan’s Answer

Hi there, I studied Counseling Psychology as my graduate degree, and as part of that program I saw clients. At the end of my program I decided not to pursue my license. I found it hard and very exhausting to sit with clients, because you must be Extremely present during the sessions which takes a significant amount of energy. I had not counted on that part. I found the issues people presented with to be less challenging than the energy it took me to be actively listening and present for so many hours at a time.

The other thing is that the progress is relatively slow, people need time and space and trust to make movement, in my experience, it does not happen quickly at all. I found that somewhat of a challenge as well. HOWEVER, what I will say is that I use the training I got during my program in every aspect of my life, in my work, with my coworkers and my boss, with my clients, and in my personal life.
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Samuel’s Answer

Greetings and salutations! My name is Samuel Colis Achiles. I am a recent graduate from California State University Dominguez Hills, with a Bachelor’s degree on Kinesiology. Though my field of study primarily focuses on physical and occupational therapy, there are still several similarities in respect to psychology, and, therefore, mental therapy.

I could say that the difficulty of being a mental therapist is that every individual person is different, with differing personalities. Therefore, it would be your duty as a therapist to become intimate in learning what you can about the individual personally, making it more effective in administering your treatment and advice accordingly.

That is all the advice I can muster for you, Mylar. Hope this helps!
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Racheal’s Answer

I think this question is rooted in training, experience, support/consultation, goals, reasoning and ongoing training. Overall, it's subjective because you will learn so much about self and others, especially with more personal and professional experience. For me, it's not hard because I remain teachable. Stay teachable, remember that becoming a mental health therapist comes with a learning curve, so when you give back, you will realize it's all worth it.
As far as a timeline, it depends on the degree area you want to pursue. There is a different timeline to becoming a licensed mental health therapist with a degree in psychology (PhD or PsyD), vs Social Work vs Marriage and Family Therapy vs Licensed Mental Health Therapy . You can looks those up to see how you want to spend your time and state requirements for licensure.
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Cynthia’s Answer

It depends on the environment you choose and how you adapt to stress. There are many factors to consider. Some therapists sit multiple hours a day and listen to others talk about their problems and what might be troubling them. The mental health field is varied though, which means that being a mental health therapist isn't always sitting and listening to clients tell you about their problems. I have worked in the recovery field for several years and that includes providing psychoeducation to clients along with counseling sessions. That means I have the opportunity to teach clients coping skills and even what processes in the brain occur in those struggling with addiction. I have an opportunity to create coursework for our program and I go out to the community and speak to school counselors, probation departments, etc. to give them an overview of what our program can provide for a multitude of clients of all ages. My varied duties allow me to do change up my routine so I feel less stressed and can still provide clients with the help they need. I do have friends and associates who, in their private practice, see individual clients throughout the day and it can become tiring at times. Scheduling client's a little farther apart can help with burnout for therapists.
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Mark’s Answer

Many people choose to go into this field because they have high empathy and want to make a difference. I personally know people who have burned out in this field. If you care very much about people and have high empathy it can get exhausting to deal with other people's problems every day. In the movies it's always a happy ending but in real life you can work with someone and make improvements, and they will be unhappy and have problems. You might never get that resolution you are looking for with every patient. It's a very difficult position to be in.
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