Skip to main content
6 answers
8
Asked 459 views

How to get ready for college right after high school with all Bs?

I have all Bs but i just want to know the easiest way to get ready for a community college? #high-school #career #internships

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

6 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Doc’s Answer

Dylan it's important to have at least the foundation of an academic plan before you begin your classes. While it's okay to not be 100% sure of your future plans, you should at least have a general notion of your academic and professional goals. If you're planning to transfer to a 4-year school, research the requirements and transfer allowances for your school. If you aren't prepared, you could find yourself taking courses that don't transfer or apply towards your degree. If you enter with a definitive course sequence, on the other hand, you can earn your associate's degree in an efficient manner and move on to a 4-year university without wasting time and money. Although this may sound like an intimidating process, you don't have to do it alone. Community colleges have academic advisers for this very reason. Whether you're pursuing an associate's degree or a shorter certificate, talk to an adviser and devise a course of action that best suits your goals. Attending a community college can be a fun and rewarding experience, but it can also be challenging if you aren't adequately prepared. Between trying to figure out what classes to sign up for, how to pay for school and what books and supplies you need, it's all too easy to feel overwhelmed. Your odds of successfully adjusting to school and completing your chosen program on schedule can increase if you enter community college with an organized plan of attack.

HAVE A PLAN
One of the best ways to ensure success in community college is to have a plan before you ever even set foot on campus. Creating a plan beforehand helps you avoid the stress of figuring things out on the fly. Be sure to create a plan that is structured, yet flexible. You never know when an emergency or unexpected event is going to strike, and you may need to quickly make changes and adjustments to your schedule. A rigid and inflexible plan, though it may keep you on track, may also hinder your chances at success because it does not allow for disruptions. Give yourself plenty of leeway so that any potential complications will not interrupt your academic goals. Proper time management is crucial to your success. As soon as you receive your list of classes, get to work building a weekly schedule that incorporates classes, study time, and other time commitments (such as your work schedule or family obligations). Allow plenty of time for homework and other projects, but also give yourself time to rest; community college can be a big time commitment, but it shouldn't take over your life. Give yourself occasional breaks so that you can have some fun and relax. These small respites can let you recharge and help prevent you from getting overwhelmed.

hope this was helpful Dylan

Doc recommends the following next steps:

Plan to work hard in high school. Taking the most challenging classes available (AP, IB, Dual Enrollment and Honors classes) will benefit you in multiple ways. In addition to learning the course content, such as Algebra, Chemistry, or a foreign language, college preparatory classes will also develop your skills in note-taking, studying, writing, test-taking, time management, critical thinking, and more. These important skills will prepare you for the rigor of college classes.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Kim for your continued support. It's not what happens to us that determines how far we go in life; it is how we handle what happens to us. Doc Frick
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Dexter’s Answer

Hi Dylan,

If you have time, something that might help you get better grades in college would be to build up a solid foundation by setting a goal to ace your college classes in 2021. To help you do that, I would recommend going on to http://khanacademy.org and going over the subjects and concepts that you found difficult. Once you're confident that your understanding of the high school courses is set, then I would prepare for your college courses by doing prep work using Khan Academy. Life throws lemons at us, so it helps a lot being prepared and learning things before we really need to. For me, I've always found that I absorb a lot better the second time around a new subject.

I wish you the best of luck!

--
Dexter
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Markus’s Answer

Hello Dylan,

Congrats on graduating high school with all B's! If you are worrying are stating that you got all B's in a derogatory sense, it is important to understand that college is a different beast all together. There is no doubt that it will take more commitment and dedication but I personally did not learn this until I started college, school was not my focus in high school and I really did not care to get great grades. I started college and flunked classes my first year and half. After I took a break, I graduated with honors.

This is what I would recommend now that you have graduated high school:

1. Take a step forward and realize that success in high school has nothing to do with your success in college (or life for that matter). Make new goals and stay dedicated/committed. This unfortunately means staying at home and studying while others are out having fun.

2. Start learning to love reading/learning. I still read all the time to this day and part of this habit is from college. If you truly enjoy learning college will become easy.

3. Learn what your passions are by trying new hobbies and taking advantage of opportunities. I found during my generals what I liked to learn about and what I did not like to learn about. Knowing this before jumping into school would be helpful, if not use your generals to find this out.

Honestly, I got better at college by going to college. With every class I passed, the next class was easier. The structure for most classes are the same so if you put in the practice early and really try to understand that structure, how you study and your passions, you will be successful. Keep it up and I wish the best for you!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Miko’s Answer

Great question. Try to take as many Math and English classes in your senior year. The first year in college sometimes require prerequisite classes (Non credit) so this will better prepare you to move to credit classes. The more classes the better and it less money on your parents pockets! Its always common to leave school half a days as a senior but just add on another Math that will help you long term. Hope this helps!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Dylan! Bs are pretty good for high school and even college as well! It does depend on some programs to have more As than Bs; for example if planning to apply to medical or law school (just as a side note). If you mean how to prepare for classes in cc, I would recommend to stay organized, carry a planner and mark down important dates for assignments and exams; I would also attend class and not miss any. Attending class allows you stay interactive and engaged with the course curriculum and it will motivate you further to study for the class and get a good grade; sometimes when students miss class it can be difficult to stay on top of the work therefore always attend class. With class you should also attend office hours to get to know your professors better, especially if you might need a reference or recommendation letter for an internship , job or furthering education at a 4 year university. Lastly, set time each day to study for your classes, the more credits you take the more you should be studying each day; read, take notes, quiz yourself, make notecards/flashcards (Quizlet is helpful as you can make the notecards online and even star the ones you want to redo, you can also test your knowledge with practice tests). There are also tutoring services as well so definitely use them especially for when you struggle in a subject and early too! Honestly in the end being prepared for college means balancing your life; your social life, work life and academic life because it's being able to take responsibility for yourself and know that even though you have more independence to use it wisely.

I hope this helps!
Best of luck future undergrad!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Dylan,

Only you know you! Did you get B's in HS by struggling, or, was it easy, and, if you had tried, you would have had A's?

My recommendations:
1. Don't overload yourself your first semester. College takes some getting used to. If you take 15 hrs with a lot of reading, you set yourself up for failure. You need to set yourself up for success! Take 12 hrs, (or, 13 if there is a short library/college orientation class).

2. Understand scheduling. You pick your classes, and, the times they meet. If you schedule a class for 8 a.m. and your brain doesn't wake up until 9:30, again, you are setting yourself up for failure. Schedule classes for the times of day when your brain is most alert!

3. More on scheduling: Include some room in your schedule for eating, visiting with friends, and studying. This should be a block of time equivalent to two class periods. So, you might have 2 classes from 9-11, and then no more classes until 1 pm. A one-hour block isn't enough!

4. And, don't try to do all your classes on one day, unless you have to! You can take two on M/W/F and two on T/Th. With that schedule, you might have one class from 9-10, take a break from 10-12, and another class from 12-1. Or, you might take the two classes back to back, and have study time afterwards. You also want time to cram right before an exam, possibly, so, keep that in mind!

5. Keep up with your reading and assignments. That is CRITICAL. Do the readings prior to lecture, and review very soon after lecture.

6. Figure out what study style works best for you. It does not good to read a chapter three times if it does sink in! You need to write notes as you read, make flashcards, etc. Figure out what works, and remember it does no good to study when you are tired!

7. If you are struggling, GET HELP, before falling too far behind. There are various student support services on campus. Become familiar with them BEFORE you need them! There's nothing wrong with asking for help!

8. Have friends in the class, so, if you miss, you can get the notes.

9. On the first day of class, the professor will hand out the syllabus. This will tell you the schedule for the semester, required textbooks, etc. The one question I recommend you ask is this: "On the test, what percentage of the questions are from the readings, and what percentage is from the lectures?" I hate studying books, only to find the test is completely lecture-based.

Finally, you have to WANT to do this. If you are not driven to finish, you won't. You need to find ways to overcome any obstacles that pop up. "car won't start" is such an easy excuse for not going to school. Don't fall for it. Be determined, and you WILL succeed!

0