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If im trying to get into a good college, does taking 3 years of language make a huge difference even though 2 is the minimum?

Right now, my schedule for next year consists of 2 math classes because that will leave open a spot for an AP class in junior year, instead of having to wait till senior year. However it kicks out a language class and an art class. If I take the 2 math classes I will only be able to have 2 years of a language, so I'm not sure if I should just take the 2 maths, or do something else, like only taking 1 math, or take an extremely hard and rigorous class over the summer (which I am not a fan of) to get 3 years. #general #math

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Simeon’s Answer

I'd recommend not worrying about taking additional languages. Most colleges won't weigh your language classes that much. If you can take more AP classes that will be counted towards college credit, you will be much better served and be able to get to the funner parts of your college degree much quicker.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Myles
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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Myles,

I would say no. There is a minimum for a reason. If you meet that, I would say that you are good. One caveat would be if you plan to study language in college. Do you already know your major? If it's not a language, then I would say that you are fine. If it is a language, then I believe that the third year of language would be better than a math class. In high school, you have the advantage of getting to learn a lot about everything. I would recommend continuing in Math, especially if it is a subject that you struggle in. Math only gets harder in college, so any additional experience with Math is likely to be a benefit to you.

Gloria
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Myles
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Scott’s Answer

I'd only focus on taking language classes if it is something you are passionate about. I took 3 years of Spanish in high school and can't even speak it conversationally. If you truly want to learn another language I would suggest looking into taking a semester abroad somewhere. It will be a great learning experience.
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Andrew’s Answer

Based on my understanding, there appears to be a tension between taking math classes and language classes because you want to be accepted by a “good” college. This tension is unnecessary and counterproductive. Furthermore, a “good” college is a matter of definition. A “good” college should be one in which you can blossom intellectually and academically that paves your future career path.

The most important question you should be concentrated on is what do you want to do for a career in your life? That will give you a hint of what you want to major in when you get to college.

Once you have an idea of what you want to major in when you get to college, you should be able to choose a high-school curriculum that will get you prepared for your target major. If you would like to major in arts and humanities, fluency in multiple languages may be an asset. But if you want to get into STEM areas, math courses would be the most logical choice.

Lastly, I would like to comment on your statement “or take an extremely hard and rigorous class over the summer (which I am not a fan of).” Based on my experience, it takes sacrifice to have a chance to taste success. Therefore, be prepared to make the necessary sacrifice in order to have a chance to fulfil your dream.
Thank you comment icon okay thanks! Myles
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Jennifer’s Answer

Hi, Myles!

Sounds like you're putting together your high school curriculum - which can be confusing and convoluted ....
As hard as it seems, try to consider the bigger picture. If you know what you're interested in doing in college or career, focus on the things that will help propel you in that direction. If you don't know (or aren't sure), don't worry; consider keeping your options open and explore subjects that are of interest to you.

If you're interested in languages, anything global, or have an aptitude for the subject, take the additional year. If it interferes with something that you would rather do, don't sweat it. Colleges and universities consider the rigor of coursework and the earned grades in determining admissions, along with other factors of varying importance. Your high school courses should show something about you, whether it's more exploratory or focused in nature. Try to be deliberate in your choices; what lead you to your decision to take the course (or not)? What do you hope to gain through the completion of the course?

Consider the forest, rather than getting bogged down by the individual trees. For high school, your focus should be getting the best foundational knowledge that you can while exploring the myriad of subjects that can help educate you along your path to bigger and better things!


Thank you comment icon I will keep this in mind, thank you! Myles
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