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How do you manage your time?

I am a senior in High School and my time management sucks, how do I improve it before I graduate and go to college and get bombarded with even more responsibiliti #high-school #high-school-students es

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Jennifer’s Answer

Hi, Dominik!

This is a great question -- and one that many adults find themselves asking. Take for instance the explosion of material being published today on habits. I'd like to encourage you to think about time management a bit differently. Wise people have said that you can't manage time; time ticks by whether you want it to or not. What you have control over, on the contrary, is how you manage YOU. There are a variety of ways to do this, and I've found that one size does not fit all in this category. There will be some trial and error to find out the best way for you.

To this end, here are some ideas for you to consider, try, adapt/adjust, and work through towards your way of doing things.
--Consider what's important to you. What do you do, and why do you do it?
--Make a list of your priorities. What needs to get done? Be honest with yourself about those things that are important priorities that you might not want to do ....
--Once your priorities are set, think about how much time it takes to do them realistically.
--Set realistic expectations. It does no good to make a list of 20 things for the day, when you've only got time for 5-6 of them.
--Get a planner, a sheet of paper, or a project management app on your phone that can help you set a schedule. Don't overcomplicate things; pick a simplified way to keep track of your time.
--Set timers, if needed, to move you through the different tasks.
--Hold yourself accountable. Your time is important. Waving off a scheduled priority shouldn't be the norm; it should be the exception. You've made an appointment with yourself to do something, and it should be taken seriously.
--Build in some down time. This is important too. You will need to recharge in some way, and you know yourself best.
--Take time in the beginning and end of the day to go over your daily schedule/priorities and reflect on how you've done, respectively. Make adjustments as needed. Life happens; things don't always go according to plans. Taking contingencies into consideration and allowing for flexibility can make a difference in your perceived ability to get things done as well as executing the plan you've set for yourself.

If you can focus your attention on the things that are most important, account for contingencies, allowing down time, and reflect on what you're doing to make adjustments, you're well on your way to creating healthy and productive habits! It's certainly not easy, and frequently takes time, but I think the end results will be worth the effort! Wishing you all the best in your endeavors --
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Doc’s Answer

Dominik the important thing is how you use your study time, not how long you study. Long study sessions lead to a lack of concentration and thus a lack of learning and retention. The most effective practice is to work a short time on each class every day. The total amount of time spent studying will be the same than one or two marathon study sessions, but you will learn the information more deeply and retain much more for the long term—which will help get you an A on the final.

In order to spread out studying over short periods of time across several days, you need control over your schedule. Keeping a list of tasks to complete on a daily basis will help you to include regular active studying sessions for each class. Try to do something for each class each day. Be specific and realistic regarding how long you plan to spend on each task—you should not have more tasks on your list than you can reasonably complete during the day. In addition to learning the material more deeply, spacing out your work helps stave off procrastination. Rather than having to face the dreaded project for four hours on Monday, you can face the dreaded project for 30 minutes each day. The shorter, more consistent time to work on a dreaded project is likely to be more acceptable and less likely to be delayed to the last minute. Finally, if you have to memorize material for class (names, dates, formulas), it is best to make flashcards for this material and review periodically throughout the day rather than one long, memorization session.

Hope this helps Dominik

Doc recommends the following next steps:

First and foremost, make sure you get a college planner. If digital works better for you (since you can sync it with just about anything – your computer, phone, tablet), think about setting up an agenda on your mobile device. Create a study plan at the beginning of the semester based on your course syllabus. Ideally, you should study a little bit every day throughout the week —even just 30 minutes can make a huge difference—so you don’t wind up cramming and stressing out right before the big exam.
Studying starts in the classroom. Pay attention and take good notes, so when you’re studying later, you’re just reviewing information (instead of learning it for the first time). Speak with your professor about recording lectures on your phone. A recording can complement your notes so you can go back and re-listen to the information in case there are other details you pick up on later to note. Effective note-taking strategies can have a direct impact on your study habits and is one of the most important study tips for college.
Make it a priority to know deadlines for projects and any other course milestones. If you find yourself struggling or you're unsure where to start, seek help early on. Use your calendar to remind yourself about upcoming deadlines and consider connecting with another student as an accountability partner. Create a support structure that makes it difficult to procrastinate.
If you really don’t understand a concept, ask questions! Stop by your professors’ offices during their office hours, or contact classmates and professors via email. Some classes might even have a Facebook Group to keep students engaged and to create an environment to ask questions outside of class. Either way, your professors will be on your side – nonjudgmental, wanting to help you understand the class in its entirety.
Occasionally, college professors will tell you the information that will (or won’t) be on an exam—listen to them! They’re sharing this information with you to save you time so you’re not studying the wrong information for hours, and you can focus on the important points. If you’re unsure about what to focus on while studying, send your professor a quick email to confirm or speak with him or her after class.
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Hira’s Answer

Hi Dominik!

I would recommend you to improve your focus more than your time management skills. Time management will come as a byproduct once you're able to control your focus.

And the reason I say this is that there are never enough hours in a day to get everything done no matter how organized you are.

>>>There's a rule I follow: One task at a time with absolute focus, no distractions.

Try this out yourself and see if it works. When you start working on a task, make it a point to give your full attention and focus to it.
If you succeed in working on one task with absolute focus, you'll realize that something you thought would take you an hour, took you 30-40 minutes instead. Once you get the hang of it, it'll become very easy for you to manage your time and work.

The second thing I would recommend is to keep one list for all the tasks you need to do and add dates/times to them if there is a deadline you have to meet. Treat these tasks as simple reminders of the things you need to do and refer to the list during the day as needed. When you complete a task, mark it done, this creates a sense of accomplishment which enables you to continue working on the next task on the list.

Following apps can be useful for task management. I've found Nozbe to be the most helpful as it is extremely user-friendly, the mobile app opens the to-do list instantly and you can add a task with one click (they have a free trial that you can try out). Asana is pretty good too and it's free of cost.

- Nozbe Personal: https://nozbe.com/personal
- Asana: https://asana.com

I hope this helps you and all the best!

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Chantell’s Answer

Time management strategies vary from person to person, so some tips I recommend may not be fit for you, but that’s okay!

My biggest recommendation would be to get a planner. I used my planner all throughout high school and college. In fact I still use one today! Planners give you a nice visual on what needs to be completed when. Having due dates right in front of you is a good reminder when you need to work on something.

A tip I have is to not only write down the due date of an assignment, but to write down on specific days when you need to work on said assignment. This way you have time set aside to work on it, and you’re not just scrambling to get it done the night before. In college, a lot of assignments take days to complete, and can’t be done in just one sitting.

Prioritize your work and tasks. Know what things take a higher importance, and complete those first.

Have goals! Set goals for yourself, whether it be having a certain GPA by the end of the semester or getting into a certain school. These goals will help you have motivation to get things done, and get them done in a timely manner.
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Simeon’s Answer

I would recommended setting aside time to look at how your past week went. I find that trying to follow a strict schedule isn't something you do unless it comes naturally. Instead, it can be helpful to look back once a week/day/month to reflect on what you spent on. Try to take some notes about what you've spent your time doing. I like this approach because it's a guilt-free approach where you ask yourself if you like how you're spending your time and where you might be wasting time on things you don't really value or enjoy.
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Carol Anne’s Answer

Hi there! Totally agree with the previous answers - but wanted to suggest checking out the 5-second rule by Mel Robbins. She has a great TEDTalk on it and its an easy way to return yourself to a task or start a task you may not want to. I find that getting started is sometimes the hardest part and that is what causes my time wasting and procrastination. Hope this helps!
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John’s Answer

I'll keep it short. Plan! Write down your objectives for the day and follow that plan to the best of your ability and ensure your "must do" items get done daily. Make deadlines for your future tasks.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hi Dominik! Like you, I had really bad time management skills. It's something that gets better with practice. I like creating a schedule for myself and mapping out my day, and during those working/study hours, I put my phone on do not disturb as well as my laptop. They key I found is finding a place that has minimal distractions. Also, it really helps to find a friend that has great time management skills and study with them because that way you have someone to keep you accountable.
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Savannah’s Answer

Hi! To time manage your time, i find it easier to stay motivated i you take breaks so you can do what you want but also when you get back doing work you have more energy and get more inclined to do it. Also if you take too long on one class you will get bored of it, so i recommend after you do an assignment for on class you take a little break or you more to a different class and do that assignment so you can get more work done. Hope this helps!!
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Cameron’s Answer

Time management takes time and practice to develop, but it's an important skill to have!

My biggest recommendation is to use a planner--it can be either a physical notebook or an online task management system like Asana. Whichever platform you choose to use, I recommend noting the due dates of each assignment, project, or task. It's also helpful to prioritize the them and outline when you will be working on each of them, so if you have 3 assignments all due on the same day, you can allocate specific times to work on each so that you complete all of them on time.

Keeping an up-to-date calendar on your phone can also help you keep track of all of your events so you know when you're booked and when you have some free time.

And don't forget to leave time for things you enjoy! It can be easy to get caught up with school or work, but it's important to spend time with family and friends as well. Hope this helps!

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