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Do people with higher degrees most likely get better positions at a job?

I am going to school for a master's in journalism and a Ph.D in communications. I wanted to know if when I apply to a job I'm more likely to get a higher position that is available since I have a higher degree of education. #journalism #communications #broadcast-journalism #marketing-communications #investigative-reporting

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Sharnel’s Answer

I would take time to reflect on your specific career goals and how an advanced degree can help you achieve what you want. Are you looking for more responsibility and awesome projects in an individual contributor role or are you looking to lead others?


In my view, communication is ever-more 'digital' ... I would devote my time and energy learning how to apply my craft in the digital world ... focus on building a digital skill set (working with Adobe, learning basic HTML, content management systems and marketing automation platforms, etc.). Content strat, development and story-telling are still central, but what makes you really valuable is being able to develop the content AND execute it in an increasingly digital environment. For me - those skills combined with the right degree (not necessarily advanced), attitude and talent make a candidate stand out ... not a PhD in communications.

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Gary’s Answer

Hi,
Good question, in my experience a higher degree is does not always qualify you for a higher position...it depends on a lot of factors, the career field, the industry, the company and the job/requirements.

Having a higher level degree can qualify you for more positions but again it depends on what you want to do with your degrees.
Your individual expectations have a lot to do with your future and it is up to you to determine what a "higher position" means...more money, more responsibility, a higher level job title, etc.
Hope this helps a little...Good luck!

Thank you comment icon Thank you for the answer. It's really helpful to me to get information now so I can apply for colleges by the end of this year. Lexis
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Kerri’s Answer

I find that where it tends to come in handy to have a higher or the highest level of education possible is when you are up against another candidate with similar or identical experience. A higher level of education might differentiate you to be the best candidate. Another positive aspect to having several degrees or continuing your education is if you were to get it in another discipline that might supplement your initial education achievements.

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Subbaiah’s Answer

The future of work isn’t about degrees. More ever, I will be about skills.
Most often degrees are still thought as a lifelong attribute for professional competency.
According to recruiters what matters is not whether someone has a degree or not , it all depends on how well they perform.
To be sure, again degree is not a waste of time for everyone.
A person with a higher degree and great skills are more prone to get better job positions at a job.
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Brandon’s Answer

I wouldn't expect to get a higher position with your first job out of school but in general you will be more likely to get jobs that you do apply for because having a Master's along with a separate PhD is a very rare commodity in the Journalism world. The comparison for employers will be to weigh your advantage in education with the job experiences of other candidates. It's fair to expect the higher end of the salary range designated for your first position and with your education background combined with future experience you could position yourself to move up quickly.

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